'Nation to Nation'? Indigenous people and the Trudeau government

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quizzical

i like it. interesting to see a start anyway.

swallow

Quote:

Trudeau's 5 priorities

The prime minister said his government would immediately move on the following five promises the Liberals made during the recent election campaign:

  • Launch a national public inquiry into missing and murdered indigenous women.
  • Make significant investments in First Nations education.
  • Lift the two per cent cap on funding for First Nations programs.
  • Implement all 94 recommendations from the Truth and Reconciliation Commission.
  • Repeal all legislation unilaterally imposed on indigenous people by the previous government.

[url=http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/justin-trudeau-afn-indigenous-aboriginal... lays out plan for new relationship with indigenous people[/url]

swallow

Quote:

Romeo Saganash on Thursday introduced a private member’s bill that, if passed, would require Canadian laws to be “in harmony” with the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

Saganash said the bill is a reincarnation, with some tweaks, of a similar law he proposed in the last Parliament, when the Conservatives were in power. The Liberals supported his previous bill.

Saganash, a Cree MP representing the Quebec riding of Abitibi-Baie James-Nunavik-Eeyou, said his bill would test whether the Liberals can match their words on reconciliation with action.

[url=http://aptn.ca/news/2016/04/21/saganash-says-his-undrip-bill-true-test-o... says his UNDRIP bill ‘true test’ of Liberal’s commitment to Indigenous peoples[/url]

Quote:

Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr said Thursday the Liberal government is in the process of developing a “Canadian definition” of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

However, Carr did not say how this Canadian definition would be implemented or whether it would be contained in possible legislation on UNDRIP and its application to federal laws.

[url=http://aptn.ca/news/2016/04/21/ottawa-developing-canadian-definition-of-... developing ‘Canadian definition’ of UNDRIP, says Liberal minister[/url]

In other news, will Ottawa  develop a "Canadian definition" of the UN Declaration of Human Rights that will solemnly endorse human rights but not actually enforce them? A "Canadian definition" of the Convention Against Torture that allows "a little bit of torture, eh"? There can't be "Canadian definitions" of global treaties and instruments - either you support them, or you don't. And Canada needs to support UNDRIP, or it will be breaking common sense and Trudeau's own top commitments to indigenous peoples. 

iyraste1313

Natural Resources Minister Jim Carr said Thursday the Liberal government is in the process of developing a “Canadian definition” of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

...if my understanding is correct, it is the Human Rights Tribunals that hear cases and make judgement on the meaning of the Convention...I've read a number of case judgements by some of these Tribunals, for which Canada in its treatment of Indigenous Nations continues in gross violation, particularly in regards to the cases on consultation and consent...

The problem of course that Canada being nothing but a resource extraction corporation, especially thanks to globalization, would be severely compromised economically and financially if it actually respected such international law.....

...to respect such law, means we have to come up with a different game plan politically for Canada, something of course which reform politics cannot do!

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

The Liberals are going to face the first real test of their commitment to a new relationship with First Nations. The H of C will have a bill in front of it that the Liberals voted for in opposition. We shall see if they vote for it in government. The Bill will effectively give First Nations veto rights over projects in their territories such as pipelines and Site C and fracking and mining.

I sincerely hope they do the right thing but I suspect they will vote against it because they are developing a "Canadian" model that will pay lip service while ceding little to no actual control  to FN's.

Quote:

Liberals supported previous bill

The MP's attempt to table a similar bill last year was voted down by the then-Conservative government, but he said considering the Tories' track record on such issues, it wasn't a surprise.

"I even made a last pitch on the very day it was debated and voted on, and it was a flat no," he said. "I saw it coming."

Back then the Liberal party supported the proposed legislation, which gives Saganash reason to hope it will pass this time.

Comments made by Justin Trudeau at the Assembly of First Nations last summer, before he was prime minister, might also buoy those supporting the bill.

"Reconciliation starts with recognizing and respecting aboriginal title and rights, including Treaty rights," Trudeau said in his address to the assembly.

"A Liberal government will do just that. Not only in accordance with constitutional obligations, but also with those enshrined in the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples."

Minister of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Carolyn Bennett has made no statement on whether the Liberals would support the legislation this time around.

http://thetyee.ca/News/2016/04/22/Indigenous-Rights-Bill/

quizzical

we'll see how fast this non-support will move to the Liberals are liars thread

swallow

Quote:

The Trudeau government has promised to implement the UN declaration. The new ministers of Indigenous Affairs and Justice have shown leadership in House of Commons discussions, particularly in the emergency debates on suicide.

The real test now is whether the new government is prepared to enact a legislative framework.

[url=http://montrealgazette.com/opinion/columnists/opinion-private-bill-is-a-... Coon Come: Private bill is a chance for Canada and indigenous peoples to move forward[/url]

iyraste1313

{we'll see how fast this non-support will move to the Liberals are liars thread.....}

unfortuneately things are far more sophisticated in these modern times of deception politics.....while they may actually support some form of legislation, be assured they will do everything legally to ignore and misuse the legislation and the International Agreement...

so this will demand international action!

Their version of legislation must be presented to international lawyers and maybe court action, otherwise they will get away with continuing the violations while maintaining their bs international appearance of respectability

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

iyraste1313 wrote:

unfortuneately things are far more sophisticated in these modern times of deception politics.....while they may actually support some form of legislation, be assured they will do everything legally to ignore and misuse the legislation and the International Agreement...

Actually there is nothing particularly new with the idea that the white man speaks with a forked tongue. Just look at the Treaties we have signed and how any vagueness (and they are deliberately vague) has been used to deny providing meaningful services.

mark_alfred

(note, the following quote below is from a recent duplicate thread -- I just became aware of this thread, so I've transplanted this here)

epaulo13 wrote:
..while the bill from saganash is important there is no enforcement mechanisms.

Yeah, that's true.  Still, it firmly establishes recognition of UNDRIP, and obligates the government to both establish a plan to meet the UNDRIP's obligations and it establishes that the government must report annually on the progress of this obligation.  It would be an important statutory achievement, I feel.  Further specifics regarding any accompanying machanisms deemed necessary to achieve the acknowledged government obligation could be drawn up later in regulations, I figure.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

mark_alfred wrote:

(note, the following quote below is from a recent duplicate thread -- I just became aware of this thread, so I've transplanted this here)

epaulo13 wrote:
..while the bill from saganash is important there is no enforcement mechanisms.

Yeah, that's true.  Still, it firmly establishes recognition of UNDRIP, and obligates the government to both establish a plan to meet the UNDRIP's obligations and it establishes that the government must report annually on the progress of this obligation.  It would be an important statutory achievement, I feel.  Further specifics regarding any accompanying machanisms deemed necessary to achieve the acknowledged government obligation could be drawn up later in regulations, I figure.

..i repeat undrip is an important step.

..the indian act contains enforcement and this needs to be addressed. undrip and the indian act cannot co-exist as they are in contradiction. extraction proceeds under the indian act and is contrary to undrip. it should be a concern to everyone that this is occurring right now and not rely on what governments may or may not draw up later. all parties need to be calling for an end to the indian act. 

swallow

The Indian Act has to go, for sure, but so far it hasn't partly because without it, there are protections for First Nations that would be lost. Passing UNDRIP into law would help make those protections available elsewhere, so I think Saganash's bill is an important piece of starting to dismantle colonialism. 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

swallow wrote:

The Indian Act has to go, for sure, but so far it hasn't partly because without it, there are protections for First Nations that would be lost. Passing UNDRIP into law would help make those protections available elsewhere, so I think Saganash's bill is an important piece of starting to dismantle colonialism. 

..i see this differently. i don't believe that the political will is there to really end the indian act nor to implement undrip...in spite of all the lip service. this will be a fight and enormous pressure will need to come from the bottom up. this pressure, i believe, will come from the existing struggles around extraction. 

mark_alfred

Saganash's bill was C-641 last time.  All Liberals present supported it (including Trudeau), though it was defeated by a vote of 131 to 149 because the Conservatives opposed it:  Vote Details  Here's some debates on it.  Generally Liberals would refer to the Kelowna Accord when they spoke in favour of the bill.

For it's current status, see Bill C-262, United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indige­nous Peoples Act.

 

swallow

epaulo13 wrote:
i don't believe that the political will is there to really end the indian act nor to implement undrip

Not without a fight, I agree. 

quizzical

yup

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..last night i attended a break free event in wpg. there was a good turnout and 85-90% were young folks. we made plans for the near future between now and oct. one of the key longer term priorities was the implementation of undrip. 

swallow

Quote:
The Trudeau government’s 2015 promises are reminiscent of 1993, when I was involved in the development of the federal Liberal Aboriginal Platform as vice-president of policy for the Liberal Aboriginal Peoples’ Commission, which consisted of Chapter 7 of the Red Bookand a longer Aboriginal platform issued in Saskatoon on October 8, 1993, by the Liberal leader at the time, Jean Chrétien....

Despite the talk of nation-to-nation relationships, the Trudeau government is maintaining this municipal model of self-government and extinguishment of Aboriginal title through what are called modern treaties.

This was confirmed by Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould when she told APTN that the Trudeau government will get rid of the Indian Act one community at a time through “sectoral government initiatives” to “bi-lateral self government agreements” to “comprehensively negotiating a treaty under the modern treaty process.” ...

As these interventions at the United Nations show, when it comes to lands, resources and the Indigenous right of self-determination, the Trudeau government isn’t any different than the previous Harper government.

[url=https://ricochet.media/en/1154/trudeau-cloaks-continued-attack-on-first-... Diabo: Trudeau cloaks continued attack on First Nations sovereignty with charm[/url]

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Repeal Bill C-51 Conference

Chief Bob Chamberlin, Vice President of Union of BC Indian Chiefs addresses the Repeal Bill C-51 Conference @ SFU Harbour Centre February 28, 2016.

quizzical

swallow wrote:

Quote:
The Trudeau government’s 2015 promises are reminiscent of 1993, when I was involved in the development of the federal Liberal Aboriginal Platform as vice-president of policy for the Liberal Aboriginal Peoples’ Commission, which consisted of Chapter 7 of the Red Bookand a longer Aboriginal platform issued in Saskatoon on October 8, 1993, by the Liberal leader at the time, Jean Chrétien....

Despite the talk of nation-to-nation relationships, the Trudeau government is maintaining this municipal model of self-government and extinguishment of Aboriginal title through what are called modern treaties.

This was confirmed by Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould when she told APTN that the Trudeau government will get rid of the Indian Act one community at a time through “sectoral government initiatives” to “bi-lateral self government agreements” to “comprehensively negotiating a treaty under the modern treaty process.” ...

As these interventions at the United Nations show, when it comes to lands, resources and the Indigenous right of self-determination, the Trudeau government isn’t any different than the previous Harper government.

[url=https://ricochet.media/en/1154/trudeau-cloaks-continued-attack-on-first-... Diabo: Trudeau cloaks continued attack on First Nations sovereignty with charm[/url]

good article

this says everything. Lberals=Conservatives

Quote:
The “Canadian definition” of UNDRIP sounds a lot like the Harper government’s position except it is couched as “reconciliation.”

In fact, the Trudeau government has called on Harper’s top federal terminator to help him continue the process used by the Harper government. Michael Wernick, the former deputy minister of Indian Affairs from 2006 to 2014, was named as clerk of the Privy Council, which is the top job in the federal bureaucracy.

So like his father, Pierre Trudeau, and successive Liberal leaders such as Jean Chrétien and Paul Martin, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau is continuing with the Liberal tradition of saying nice things in public to appear progressive, but operating as much as possible by stealth to complete the federal First Nations Termination Plan and extinguish the 8th Fire.

Unfortunately, as the last federal election shows, when Indigenous peoples vote and Indigenous candidates get elected into Parliament, and even appointed as cabinet ministers or senators, they are coopted into implementing Canada’s long-standing First Nations Termination Plan.

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Occupation ongoing: Camping out at INAC in Regina

Today marks the one-month anniversary of the protest camp outside the Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada offices in Regina, Saskatchewan. I’m participating in the camp, which was established in solidarity as part of a wave of occupations of INAC offices that began in Toronto following news of the suicide crisis in Attawapiskat.

The destruction of First Nations’ sense of self and our structures of family, community, and governance are hallmarks of Canadian colonialism. To this day, the refusal to admit that Canada has been founded on and maintained through colonial practices inhibits the federal government’s capacity to sit at the table and address the issues facing Canada. If you refuse to acknowledge historical reality, even after you have apologized for wrongs committed, it shows the need to redefine what reconciliation means to all parties involved.

The continued disparity in living conditions between the two sides of the treaty relationship reveal the impact the Indian Act has had. Most Canadians take for granted the water that comes from city taps. But in Saskatchewan, 16 First Nations are currently on a boil water list. INAC says it has a five-year plan with regard to this crisis, yet a list compiled by the office shows seven First Nations with boil water advisories extending as far back as 2002.

quote:

The 140-year-old Indian Act can be said to be the most racist piece of legislation in the world. Its repercussions are felt far and wide, as it helped set the blueprint for apartheid in South Africa and, dare I say, Palestine, establishing the practice of gathering people onto reservations to gain complete control of the population.

There was a time in my life when I thought it was fear that held me back, and then I read the Indian Act.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

epaulo13 wrote:

quote:

The 140-year-old Indian Act can be said to be the most racist piece of legislation in the world. Its repercussions are felt far and wide, as it helped set the blueprint for apartheid in South Africa and, dare I say, Palestine, establishing the practice of gathering people onto reservations to gain complete control of the population.

There is no doubt that apartheid was a hybrid combination of the Indian Act and the US's Jim Crow laws. Israeli actions in Palestine are similar to the Indian Act restrictions, particularly the laws that restrict Palestinians to their "reserves", but at this point I think it is more akin to the genocidal period of US history that the US likes to call the Indian Wars. 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

We Can Do It

'We Can Do It' is a call to action! It is a call to revolution! Created by Amai Kuda to promote the Decolonize NOW! movement and the Divest to Decolonize campaign, the song featuring guest artists Y, Kinnie Starr and M1 of Dead Prez.

With this song, Decolonize NOW! invites everyone to support us, as Black and Indigenous peoples taking a stand against the historic and ongoing colonial assault on the earth and our peoples!

We are calling on all peoples to take their money out of the big banks that are fuelling our destruction through investment in mining, fossil fuels and arms trade.

We CAN do it on our own! We will create viable, sustainable alternatives to capitalist economies. We must Decolonize Now or watch the earth and our peoples be destroyed!

www.decolonizenow.ca

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

(Re)Occupied: #OccupyINAC and British Columbia’s 1975 Militant May

When approximately thirty members of the Idle No More and Black Lives Matter movements entered the Indigenous and Northern Affairs (INAC) office in Toronto on April 13, 2016 to protest government inaction on the suicide crisis in Attawapiskat, the group, calling itself #OccupyINAC was drawing on long established political strategies. Indigenous peoples have occupied Indian Affairs offices before. Perhaps the most well-known was the 1972 American Indian Movement (AIM) occupation of the Bureau of Indian Affairs (BIA) headquarters in Washington, DC. The BIA takeover concluded the Trail of Broken Treaties—a cross-country march organized to protest broken treaty promises and the poor living conditions of Native American peoples across the country. When the caravan reached Washington, 500 American Indians took over the BIA office, destroyed records, and began a seven-day occupation, during which they presented AIM’s“Twenty Point” position paper to President Nixon, listing their demands. Less well known are the occupations that occurred in British Columbia three years later.

On May 1, 1975, Indigenous activists in BC took part in the pre-planned, simultaneous occupations of Department of Indian Affairs (DIA) district offices in Kamloops, Williams Lake, and Vernon. Like the BIA occupation and the current #OccupyINAC movement (which spread quickly to Indigenous Affairs offices in WinnipegVancouver, Regina, and Gatineau), this burst of coordinated action, dubbed “Militant May,” used peaceful occupations and pan-Indigenous solidarity to resist settler colonial intransigence and forward well-defined political aims.[1] Activists, including Indigenous leaders, grassroots peoples, and AIM members sought to dismantle DIA, demonstrate Indigenous sovereignty, and resolve the outstanding BC land claim....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Trudeau fails to deliver on election promise to support Indigenous post-secondary students

In the 2016 federal budget, Trudeau failed to deliver on his explicit election commitment to invest $50 million per year in the Post-Secondary Student Support Program (PSSSP), a federal initiative that provides support to Indigenous and Inuit students pursuing post-secondary education. Instead, the Liberals invested no new funding in the program.

quote:

The Limitations of Recognition

Post-secondary education is a right of Indigenous people. It is, as Trudeau has recognized, both a fundamental right and a treaty right dating back to foundational nation-to-nation treaties.

Following the release of the final report of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, Prime Minister Trudeau committed to "fully implement the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission". Call to action #11 stipulates providing "adequate funding to end the backlog of First Nations students seeking a post-secondary education."

Just this past month, the Government of Canada announced its intention to fully adopt and implement the United Nations Declaration on The Rights of Indigenous Peoples. Article 14 of this Declaration states that Indigenous peoples have the right to all levels and forms of education of the State without discrimination. Yet in his government's first real statement of priorities, Trudeau's first budget didn't mention the PSSSP once.

While the recent recognition of Indigenous rights is important, without the necessary funding to back it, how will Indigenous peoples' right to education ever become a reality?

quote:

The Canadian Federation of Students has launched a national petition calling for the Government of Canada to immediately invest $50 million in the PSSSP and fully fund access to post-secondary education for all Indigenous learners. Our petition requires 500 signatures to enter the House of Commons and be tabled for a government response.

Stand with Indigenous students by signing this petition. If our government's pursuit of reconciliation is genuine, Canada must not break any more promises to the Indigenous peoples of this land.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Extinguishment of Algonquin Aboriginal Title & Rights by Trudeau Government

Despite the Promise of a Nation-to-Nation Relationship the Trudeau Government is Proceeding with a Plan to Extinguish Algonquin Aboriginal Title & Rights

quote:

“Modern Treaties” are the outcome of negotiations with the federal and provincial governments and result in getting First Nations to consent to extinguishment of Aboriginal Title & Rights, giving up reserves, tax exemptions and becoming like a municipal government under federal and provincial laws in exchange for some land and cash (averaging about $25,600 per person & 9.3 Hectares (23 acres) per person) and other minimum “benefits”.

The 1975 James Bay Agreement was the first “Modern Treaty” in Canada, but Canada reduced what is on the table for negotiations after that “Modern Treaty”.

According to INAC, in Quebec, Comprehensive Claims extinguishment negotiations are currently being held with the Innu Nation, Atikamekw Nation Council, Mi'kmaq of Quebec and the Maliseet of Viger First Nation.

To our South there is a group created by the governments of Canada and Ontario called the “Algonquins of Ontario”. The "Algonquins of Ontario" is not a band, First Nation, Nation or entity who hold Aboriginal title or rights, under Algonquin law, Canadian law or international law.

According to our Tribal Council (Algonquin Nation Secretariat) over 3,000 people on the AOO registration list have not even had intermarriage with any Algonquins for over 200-300 years.

How can these individuals be allowed to have a decisive voice in Algonquin Aboriginal Title and Rights negotiations, especially setting a precedent on extinguishing Algonquin Title and Rights?

In March 2016, there was a Referendum on an Agreement-in-Principle to extinguish Algonquin Aboriginal Title, Rights, the Golden Lake Reserve and tax exemption status, among other subjects, the only status Algonquin community—the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation—voted against the Agreement-in-Principle, but their Chief and Council have not pulled out of the land claims negotiation process. Not surprisingly, the non-status and “instant Algonquins” voted for the Agreement-in-Principle since they have nothing to lose.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Extinguishment of Algonquin Aboriginal Title & Rights by Trudeau Government

quote:

Unlike the approach of the five member communities of the AANTC, who are seeking to enter Canada's Comprehensive Claims extinguishment process, in early May 2016, our Algonquin First Nation along with Wolf Lake, Timiskaming and Kebaowek (Eagle Village) submitted an Early Warning Urgent Action Request to the United Nations Committee on Elimination of Racial Discrimination (CERD) informing the Committee of the violation of our Algonquin Human Rights by the fabrication of the "Algonquins of Ontario" by the governments of Canada and Ontario to extinguish Algonquin Aboriginal Title and Rights through the referendum of an Agreement-in-Principle, which the members of the Algonquins of Pikwakanagan First Nation have now clearly rejected.

Our four Algonquin First Nations (Barriere Lake, Wolf Lake, Timiskaming and Kebaowek/Eagle Village) are calling on the UN Committee to question Canada on what actions they are taking to respond to AFN Resolution #47/2015 to replace the Comprehensive Claims Policy with a Recognition of Aboriginal Title Policy, particularly in light of the 2015 Indigenous Policy Platform of the Trudeau government.

We believe there needs to be ongoing monitoring of Canada by the CERD to ensure the UN recommendations to end the Comprehensive Claims Policy requirements of modified (extinguished) Aboriginal Title and non-assertion of rights is replaced with a policy of recognition and affirmation of Aboriginal Title, which is consistent with the Tsilhqot 'in decision and section 35 of Canada's

iyraste1313

This reminds me of the Treaty process with the Toquat? People off Uclulet, BC, who felt compelled to gain some Territory at the risk of annihilation of the community living on a postage stamp of a reserve community...so they are trying to rebuild their autonomous territory, build food and energy self reliance....

But at the cost of extinguishment of title rights?

Can a Treaty signed on desperation and security actually extinguish indigenous rights, enshrined by international law?

In this case of the Algonquin, the non status voted for Agreement in Principle...hmm, does this explain the recent Court decision to recognize non status?

And if Pikwakanagan vote against the Agreement, surely international law kicks in, which guarantees that a vote determine 'consultation and consent'

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

iyraste1313 wrote:

And if Pikwakanagan vote against the Agreement, surely international law kicks in, which guarantees that a vote determine 'consultation and consent'

International law is merely a framework. There is no way to make the government of Canada follow anything except its own Constitution. All treaty negotiations in BC have always had only one thing in mind and that is extinguishment of aboriginal land title rights.

The treaty process is a trap for First Nations who want to maintain their sovereign rights however small bands cannot fund the decades long litigation required to get those sovereign rights recognized by our courts. The reality is also that even when those rights are recognized the SCC has always stated there are limits to aboriginal rights. For most Bands the courts are a case of you pay your money and you take your chances while under the extinguishment track the government at least bribes the leaders and community to give up as yet undetermined rights.

iyraste1313

There is no way to make the government of Canada follow anything except its own Constitution. ...

This may be in error, legally, as Section 35 on aboriginal rights surely must be defined under existing international judication re indigenous rights....

But more to the point, this is a serious strategic error. Canada is not an imperial power, in fact its power stems greatly from its reputation as a just and respectful government, not the rogue government it is in fact.

So in fact Canada is vulnerable at the international NGO level given any serious political/legal pressure..

The upcoming world social forum may be a useful international forum to test this thesis!

This 'no way' attitude disempowers the potential!

swallow

Quote:
The Liberal government’s stated approach to the Inuit right to self-determination isn’t much of an improvement over that once offered by the Conservatives, Natan Obed, the president of Inuit Tapiriit Kanatami, said May 10 in a statement.

[url=http://www.nunatsiaqonline.ca/stories/article/65674on_inuit_rights_liber... Inuit rights, Liberals offer “little change,” ITK says: It’s a nice gesture, but we want more on UNDRIP, national Inuit org says[/url]

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

First Nations communities suffering ‘more intense’ impact of climate change, secret briefings say

Secret briefings to Canada’s indigenous affairs minister warn that natural disasters are increasing in number and severity, disproportionately affecting remote reserve communities.

In the aftermath of the Fort McMurray wildfires, which Prime Minister Justin Trudeau wouldn’t say were exacerbated by climate change, First Nations assert they are first and worst affected by a rapidly-shifting environment.

The Liberal government has put new money towards supporting First Nations infrastructure and “resilience.” But chiefs and opposition parties say it’s not enough.

After she took up her mantle, bureaucrats warned Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett catastrophes are getting worse and more frequent over time. Recent decades have seen up to eight times as many disasters in Canada as 100 years ago.

Advice labelled as “secret” says First Nations communities are at greater risk of emergencies, suffering “more intense” impact, with climate change causing “extreme weather” in the north....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Cindy Blackstock says Canada’s discrimination against Indigenous children continues after landmark tribunal ruling

In New Brunswick, months after the Canadian Human Rights Tribunal ruled Canada discriminates in how it pays for Indigenous child welfare, Mi’kmaq and Maliseet nations are asking what that means for them.

With little word from government, child welfare workers turn to the woman who took Ottawa before the tribunal in the first place.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould says working UNDRIP into Canadian law is ‘unworkable’

The federal government has said numerous times it embraces the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

But on Tuesday Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould made the government’s stance on UNDRIP a little clearer by saying it can’t be worked into Canadian law.

“Simplistic approaches such as adopting the United Nations declaration as being Canadian law are unworkable and, respectfully, a political distraction to undertaking the hard work actually required to implement it back home in communities,” said Wilson-Raybould to a room of chiefs at the Assembly of First Nations 37th annual general assembly Tuesday in Niagara Falls.

She said she would like to throw the Indian Act in the fire but it’s not a practical option. She called on First Nations to provide ideas for legislation that helps communities rebuild outside of the Indian Act....

swallow

epaulo13 wrote:

“Simplistic approaches such as adopting the United Nations declaration as being Canadian law are unworkable and, respectfully, a political distraction to undertaking the hard work actually required to implement it back home in communities,” said Wilson-Raybould to a room of chiefs at the Assembly of First Nations 37th annual general assembly Tuesday in Niagara Falls.

"Respectfully" in this context appears to mean "fuck you, Romeo." 

quizzical

"simplistic approaches".

talk down much Judy?

apples aren't my favourite fruit.

iyraste1313

"Respectfully" in this context appears to mean.....

...thank you for this......The Maya are very successfully using International Covenants to guarantee their rights to informed!! consultation and consent, which the Guatemalan Courts are now backing...3 major mining operations were just shut down.....

shame on the Liberals....all that work that went into draughting the Declaration, the powerful popul;ist process by all the stakeholders, coordinated by Indigenous leaders globally........If this is Government policy, it must be strenuously challenged through International Tribunals...Canada must not be allowed to maintain its impunity in violation of Indigenous rights!!

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Ethel Pearson (Pugladee) is rolling over in her grave. I had hoped for better given her lineage and upbringing but it is apparent that she has been assimilated into the system and can see no other path..

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..from april

First Nations target Trudeau's climate plan with Indigenous Climate Action

The Trudeau Government has positioned itself as allies to Indigenous peoples of Canada and has gone so far as to publicly commit to the implementation of the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP).

quote:

The relevance and impacts of implementation of UNDRIP, particularly article 19 which states the following:

States shall consult and cooperate in good faith with the Indigenous peoples concerned through their own representative institutions in order to obtain their free, prior and informed consent before adopting and implementing legislative or administrative measures that may affect them.

quote:

But what we've seen is the Trudeau government announcing plans to host consultations across the country to inform Canada’s national climate plan, potentially steering our economic and energy sectors in new directions. Yet, nowhere in the federal budget has there been resources allocated for First Nations to meaningfully engage and participate in this consultation process on a nation-to-nation level creating a real potential to leave Indigenous communities behind once again.

The issue of energy development in Canada, its effect on Indigenous Peoples and the rapidly escalating climate crisis continues to be a very polarized debate in Indian country. This couldn’t be more true than what we see in Alberta, home to one of Canada’s central economies of oil and gas, namely tar sands.

The tar sands has become a hot button topic that brings out polarizing opinions locally, nationally and internationally. Indigenous communities have called for a moratorium on tar sands development and an overhaul of the regulatory systems, citing that current regulations contribute to the erosion of the rights and title of the Nations as defined by Treaty and UNDRIP. But these concerns are not recognized and implemented into the national discourse. The government forges ahead developing positions, policies and climate targets, leaving Indigenous communities out of the equation—something UNDRIP and its creators would no doubt frown upon.

Again, we can look to Canada’s historical track record to see this is history repeating itself.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..from the above post

Indigenous engagement: not so complicated

Recently, the Assembly of First Nations, headed up by National Chief Perry Bellegarde, held a national First Nations summit on energy development in Canada and how to benefit from business as usual. Meanwhile, here in Alberta, a group of Indigenous women, hosted by Keepers of the Athabasca, organized a national summit to identify the gaps that exist for First Nations participation in climate discourse, and working towards the development of an Indigenous climate action plan.

This meeting was not only a powerful gathering of Indigenous elected and grassroots leadership in the heart of Alberta and Canada’s oil country, but it also demonstrated that the exercise of Indigenous engagement in not as complicated or difficult a task as governments have made it out to be.

The end result was the emergence of an Indigenous civil society vehicle with the name ‘Indigenous Climate Action’ to drive climate leadership in First Nations and to support an Indigenous Peoples rights based approach in focusing an indigenous peoples collective response to the federal climate action plan. Something the government is failing to support or even encourage at the provincial and national levels.

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Assembly of First Nations Seeks Investigation of Furlong Abuse Allegations

The Assembly of First Nations wants a “thorough and impartial investigation” into allegations former Vancouver Olympics CEO John Furlong abused aboriginal students more than 45 years ago.

Delegates to the assembly’s annual general meeting this week supported a resolution calling for an investigation by the RCMP and the federal government.

The resolution also called on the federal government to meet “the affected members of Lake Babine Band Council, Burns Lake Band Council, and any other affected former students to hear their concerns about the conduct of investigations and to discuss with them acceptable remedies.”

The resolution was moved by Lake Babine Chief Wilf Adam....

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Federal Justice Minister is Selling Decades Old Termination Plan as a New “Reconciliation” Framework for First Nations: By Russ Diabo

I just attended the Assembly of First Nation’s 37th Annual General Assembly in Niagara Falls, an Indigenous sacred area that is now covered with urban development consisting of a casino, hotels and restaurants, but was the site of one of the most important foundational treaties in Canada—the 1764 Treaty of Niagara between the British, the Haudenosaunee Confederacy and the Anishinabe Nations.

At the AFN assembly I observed how the Trudeau government is rolling out its interpretation of the Nation-to-Nation and Reconciliation promises with Indigenous Peoples by using AFN as a partner to help the federal government control and mange the messaging and Federal-First Nation “co-development” policy processes, as INAC Minister Carolyn Bennett described it during her speech to the AFN Assembly.

quote:

Now, with the results of the federal election giving the Liberal’s a majority government facing a significant Conservative opposition, the Trudeau government—with the help of federal bureaucrats like the Clerk of the Privy Council, Michael Wernick—has apparently decided to interpret their Indigenous platform promises narrowly by trying to tinker with the long-standing federal termination based land claims and self-government policies while focusing on First Nations’ social and economic conditions through federal programs and services. Albeit by back ending most of the federal spending until after the next federal election as evidenced by Budget 2016 and publicly pointed out by Cindy Blackstock.

The AFN, particularly National Chief Perry Bellegarde, figures prominently into the Trudeau government’s post-election strategy to control and manage community level First Nation Chiefs and Peoples’ and their demands for “real change”.

During the AFN Assembly, federal Ministers’ were handled by AFN National and Executive Committee members to avoid having to be accountable for their remarks to First Nation Community Chiefs and members at the AFN Assembly.

No questions from Chiefs were provided for in the AFN plenary session after both Minister Bennett and Wilson-Raybould spoke on the first day even after Wilson-Raybould told the Chiefs UNDRIP was “unworkable” as federal legislation, a position NDP M.P. Romeo Saganash strongly disagrees with.

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In solidarity with Colonialism No More: A place for labour in anti-colonial struggles

For three months, Colonialism No More activists in Treaty Four territory have maintained a solidarity camp outside the Regina offices of Indigenous and Northern Affairs Canada (INAC). In fact Tuesday marked 100 days of protest outside of INAC. The camp setup in April as one of a handful of occupations that emerged across the country after NDP MP, Charlie Angus brought public attention to the high rates of suicides in Attawpiskat, Ontario. Only the Regina camp remains. The demands of the movement have broadened to include the development of a publicly accessible database on conditions experienced by First Nations in Saskatchewan, a remedy to the situation facing Indigenous children who are forced into state care, and for the Treaties to be respected and upheld. Most importantly perhaps, the Camp wants to see the Indian Act abolished.

quote:

Over half of First Nations children live in poverty, and conditions are worse on-reserve. In Saskatchewan 69 per cent of on-reserve children experience poverty, compared to just 13 per cent of non-Indigenous children in the province. This is the lived reality of colonialism. Prescott says the Indian Act has taken away people’s culture and left them with few role models and sources of inspiration. Poor job opportunities and a lack of affordable housing make matters worse. In Saskatchewan the unemployment rate is five times higher for First Nations than it is for the rest of the labour market. While he remains hopeful, Prescott acknowledges that many of the long-term changes he wants to see will take time to implement.

quote:

Union members have also joined the ranks of Colonialism No More activists at the camp. Darin, with COPE Local 397, and Unifor local 1-S member, Don, were there in attendance on Day 90. Asked why they support the camp, Don says that Unifor has a strong social justice background and that he believes in the movement Colonialism No More represents. What we are dealing with, Don insists, is a form of systematic racism that can only be dealt with at the macro-level. Yet, he’s committed to the idea that people need to work from the grassroots up to affect change. For Darin, a long time labour activist, it is not enough to deal with issues of racism in the workplace alone, but in the greater community as well. He mused that we can attend union workshops on these issues all we want, but there is more to gain by simply sitting down and listening to someone like Prescott. Both Darin and Don feel it is time for labour to put words into action. And in many ways it has.

Organized labour in the community has shown its support for Colonialism No More through donations of money, equipment, food, and time. The Regina and District Labour Council, the Sask Building Trades, COPE, CUPE, and Unifor have all expressed solidarity with the camp. In fact, individual members from these respective organizations have been present at the occupation since the first demonstrations launched in the spring. The nearby Knox Metropolitan United Church and various human rights organizations have also provided assistance.

iyraste1313

recently read up on the Appeal Court's decision to fault Enbridge re the pipeline for their refusal to consult with the Indigenous Nations....now read the response from my local Liberal MP re the granting of permits by the DFO for the site C project, as the Indigenous Peoples concerned were "consulted"......

which only reconfirms my worst fears...that this government is just using deception to carry on the corporate agenda of extinguishment, dresssed up in pretty phrases to capture the sentiments of those who maintain any slightest sentiments of justice and fairness.....

Pondering

Who is the leader of the First Nations? "Nation to Nation" is not a precise definition. First Nations are not a separate country.

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2016/08/03/government-to-launch-inquiry-int...

Nor will the federal government wait until the end of the inquiry to take action to help curb the violence, said Indigenous Affairs Minister Carolyn Bennett.

The process — designed to be arm's length from government once it is up and running on Sept. 1 — is expected to last at least two years and cost at least $53.8 million — $13.8 million than was originally expected.

Bennett said the inquiry will reflect what the government heard during pre-inquiry consultations: that policing and child welfare policies will be put under the microscope, that it will not take a one-size-fits-all approach and will take into account regional differences when crafting recommendations.

I would very much like to know why the following 5 people are considered enemies of the First Nations.

5 commissioners

As part of Wednesday's formalities, ministers delivered to the commissioners a gift basket made of birch bark, lined with sealskin and wrapped in a red Metis sash. Inside was a digital copy of all the pre-inquiry research.

The five commissioners responsible for carrying out the inquiry are:

— Chief commissioner Marion Buller, B.C.'s first female First Nations judge;

— Michele Audette, a former president of the Native Women's Association of Canada;

— Qajaq Robinson, an Ottawa-based, Nunavut-born lawyer who practices civil litigation with an emphasis on aboriginal law;

— Marilyn Poitras, a professor at the University of Saskatchewan professor with a focus on indigenous law;

— Brian Eyolfson, a First Nations lawyer based in Ontario.

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..here is the thread for the inquiry. please don't mix these threads as it will be confusing as hell. and if you don't like this one please start another.

Missing, Murdered Indigenous Women Inquiry

 

mark_alfred

Oh okay, thanks epaulo13.  I'll move my post.

mark_alfred
epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..txs mark_a

Adopt and Implement the UN Declaration

Sign the petition!

In 1982, the United Nations began work on a document to protect the human rights of Indigenous Peoples globally. It took them 25 years to finish that work.

The United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples was eventually adopted by the UN in 2007 – with Canada voting against it. It was finally endorsed by Canada in 2010.

Canada has stated that they would put into place the recommendations of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission, which call for the Declaration to be adopted and implemented.

Canada now has the chance to become a world leader upholding Indigenous rights by fully standing behind this seminal document.

This Declaration would go a long way to establishing a new relationship between Canada and Indigenous Peoples, and go a long way to improving the lives of Indigenous Peoples.

We call upon the Canadian government to fully adopt and implement the Declaration, and stand up for the rights of Indigenous Peoples. We call on Canada to adopt Bill C-262 to this effect.

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First Nation Serves Evictions Notices to BC Fish Farms

Orders follow a number of developments, including federal decision to extend licences.

The Musgamagw Dzawada’enuxw, whose traditional lands includes much of the Broughton Archipelago, have boarded two Japanese-owned fish farms and delivered eviction orders to remove their operations from unceded territories over the last six days.

Melissa Willie, an elected councillor for the nation, said about 40 people participated in the cleansing ceremony and that more demonstrations are planned later this week.

Willie said a cleansing ceremony was necessary because fish farms have been clouded by a lot of “negativity” and environmental impacts, and her people wanted to do something positive.

“We will do a cleansing of our waters once we get these fish farms out,” Willie told The Tyee....

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