Buy Nothing Day

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mmphosis
Buy Nothing Day

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mmphosis
lagatta

That has always annoyed me, as it is at the end of the month when many lower-income people aren't buying much anyway. Of course it derives from the US Black Friday, which is creeping north. 

I certainly won't go "shopping", but if I need some food item, I'll buy it. 

I don't give Christmas gifts anyway. I do make tasty food (I'm making a tourtière this weekend, and freezing it). All the ingredients have been bought and the filling is almost all prepared. 

We probably have old threads on this topic. It always raises quite a bit of controversy. Adbusters can be rather weird... 

Maysie Maysie's picture

I agree, lagatta. Supporting small independent shops is not in any way the same as buying from large chains. And in my opinion, large chains should be avoided as much as possible, not just as a gimick on Black Friday.

lagatta

So, how did it go?

I certainly didn't go on a shopping spree. I had bought and prepared quite a few vegetable dishes, and I have duck meat that has to be made into a tourtière (then frozen, for Christmas/New Years' season holidays). 

Since it was the last mild, liveable day, I cycled down to Le Chaînon, a charity shop that supports help for women in crisis. Found a pair of Blondo booties that seemed to fit perfectly, and have a lamb-fur lining, for 12$

Also bought a half-bottle of wine (Argentine Fuzion). Think that was it. 

Edited to add: I very much wanted some mending wool, but the knitting shop where I buy it was out of black. It is extremely hard to find mending wool nowadays. 

Unionist Unionist's picture

I got the date wrong. I didn't buy anything yesterday.

 

onlinediscountanvils

[quote=lagatta]That has always annoyed me, as it is at the end of the month when many lower-income people aren't buying much anyway.[/quote]

Yes.

[quote=lagatta]Adbusters can be rather weird... [/quote]

And yes.

ryanw

went to the movies with free passes

unfortunately it turns out the passes were to a anime put out by a quasi religious cult called Happy Science

http://www.rottentomatoes.com/m/the_mystical_law/

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Happy_Science

I wish I had vetted the movie beforehand and chosen to pay for something else

lagatta

I'd love to read a progressive critique of Adbusters. Sure, they have made some telling points about consumer society (on high-gloss paper). But they seem oddly puritain for one thing. One can be against mindless consumption without being against pleasure. 

And do they even mention the class differences in consumption? Many working-class people with children have few choices beyond WalMarde and similar sellers of shoddy crap. Although my income is not only not veryvery high but rather precarious, like many people in the arts, it is much easier for me to seek out a few nice things, often second-hand, than it would be for parents of three. 

I was happy to hear local ecologist Dominique Boisvert speaking out against Black Friday during a CBC call-in show when one of the people calling was a woman who LOVED TO SHOP and was going to head down to NYC to indulge in the pleasures of Black Friday, so happy that the Cons had raised the exempt amount from tariff duties. (And in fairness, men probably spend even more on superfluous consumer goods; they are just more inclined to spend on car and electronics-related stuff). 

6079_Smith_W

@ lagatta

I don't buy the class consumption argument, actually.

Not that it doesn't exist, but I don;t think it is a valid reason to stop criticizing WalMart. If we were to extrapolate we would say that it isn't fair to criticize the military because it provides jobs for the poor, or to not promote veganism or vegetarianism because there are people in the world whose main diet is meat and they might feel left out.

I think shopping there is bad for everyone. If someone has to... well in the first place I realize that is their choice, and secondly I'm not going to consider theim a pariah on that one issue, and I'm not going to stop saying I think it is a bad idea, even if I recognize that they might consider it their best choice.

Besides, I'd say WalMart is being eclipsed by Giant Tiger among actual poor people. For one thing, the prices are better, and you don't need a car to get there.

 

lagatta

Oh, I'm certainly not refraining from criticism of WalMart. I don't shop there, and don't think anyone else should either. I'm very much opposed to private cars in urban areas, though I know that even in such areas, many people don't have the choice. We still have to raise awareness of the harm, and discuss the need to convert automotive jobs into jobs producing public transport vehicles, and to promote town planning that encourages walkability, cyclability and better access to public transport. 

As for the military, that is 100% government subsidized, and "our tax dollars" could be used for far more socially-useful purposes while providing employment. 

I think Giant Tiger is much more regional than WalMarde. There are two Giant Tigers in Montréal, but they are in Ville St-Laurent and Montréal-Nord. I might not need a car to get to them, but I'd have to take the bus and métro to either. We have other cheap places like Rossy (there are two walkable from my house). 

I often see people on the bus with bags from WalMarde - they are due east of here in St-Léonard. But if one doesn't have a bus and métro monthly pass, that is at least $5 to get there and back (if one has a pass buying 10 tickets at a time, as I do). 

6079_Smith_W

I think some people really need these campaigns where everyone troops off in a gang and does something special on a special day, and I have no problem with that if it raises awareness.

But personally, I agree with you; it doesn't really do it for me, and if I want to get myself a beer on buy nothing day I am going to get myself a beer. I think moderation in behaviour 365 days a year is the ultimate goal of these actions anyway.

 

 

lagatta

Yes, that is true. I'll get myself a beer, cheese or bottle of wine if I want, and certainly pick up CAT LITTER. But the SAQ (Québec wine and spirits monopoly) had a 10% off if you bu $100 promotion this weekend, and I did NOT buy into that. They know very well that if you have a lot of bottles around the house you'll up your consumption - even if you don't want to drink more it will make you feel like inviting friends over, which also means food expenses - and that you won't really have it saved up for Christmastime. Just one example of those things. 

More importantly, I do need a new computer (alas, such planned obsolescence) and there are many bargains around this time of year, but how to sort out real ones from fake promotions? 

I looked at some hits for frugality and simplicity, but so many of them have a religious, new-age spiritual or other weird agenda. And of course there are "simplicity" publications really selling yet more stuff. It is actually not easy to get one's life sorted out, not buying useless crap but at the same time having the clothing and such you may need if you have to do "straight" work at least sometimes. 

One thing I really hate is the pressure to have a portable phone and be constantly available, upon pain of losing contracts... 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I haven't used a phone almost since I retired in 2002. We don't have digital cell phone service here, by the way. If I want to talk to anyone, my tiny village is small enough that I can almost walk over and say hello. I don't do long distance calls - everyone I know is hooked up to computers and email.

Once the bridge is finished and we're connected to the mainland of Quebec - next fall according to estimates - things will likely change, beginning with cell service. I'm hoping we get broadband, but Telus told me, no, they have no plans for our area.

lagatta

Boom Boom, I'm pressured to have a phone for work. If I were retired that would be a moot point. If I lived in a small remote village, obviously all my clients would be far away. Even in Montréal, many of them are - in Vancouver, or in Europe. 

6079_Smith_W

[quote=lagatta]

More importantly, I do need a new computer (alas, such planned obsolescence) and there are many bargains around this time of year, but how to sort out real ones from fake promotions?

[/quote]

That kind of stuff I ALWAYS buy second hand on kijiji.

Hell, the fact that most of the monitors in our house (and two of our computers) I found abandoned in back lanes says way too much about conspicuous consumption.

I agree with the arguments about buying small and local (it's a personal issue for me) but I think there are also ways of playing these larger retailers, like getting several households together to buy bulk - like 50 lb lots of potatoes.

And I know what you mean about the cult stuff. I have a friend who home schooled and was shocked at what she ran into when she actually started mixing with some of the people who did the same thing. The solution to that of course is to organize it the way YOU want to do it.

 

ryanw

[quote=6079_Smith_W]

That kind of stuff I ALWAYS buy second hand on kijiji.

Hell, the fact that most of the monitors in our house (and two of our computers) I found abandoned in back lanes says way too much about conspicuous consumption.

[/quote]

twofold to this is that electronics 'recycling' donations ship them overseas to developing countries to sift through by hand for precious metals irregardless of the caustic decaying materials. so everyone should be reusing them for multiple reasons

onlinediscountanvils

Qualms aside, it inspired the name of one of the [url=http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fQ4f_lgdYz8]most wonderfully joyous pop songs[/url] I've ever heard.

lagatta

I need a laptop, not too heavy to carry around on my arthritic shoulders and with a decent monitor for my ageing eyes, and a receipt Revenue Québec and Revenue Canada will accept as a business expense. If that can be second-hand, tant mieux. 

As for home-schooling, I have lots of qualms about that, not only because of the right-wing fundie nuts that attracts, but also because it is retrograde in that it is relying mostly on the free labour of women, instead of something that has been socialized. Badly socialized to be sure, and often downright unsuitable, but is taking something public back into the home rather than criticising the negative impacts of the current educational system really a socially-progressive approach? 

Yes, I know sometimes there is no choice, but we have to keep in mind what that says about women's role, and our all-too-often unpaid work. 

Yes, I enjoyed that song. That would also have been fun at the Printemps rouge student demos. 

6079_Smith_W

 @ ryanw

In some cases yes. Saskatchewan's program for appliances and electronics does not. The main reason why I haul everything I find in back lanes there is because every one of those monitors and TVs have 4 to 5 kilos of lead in them, and all kinds of other noxious stuff.

@ lagatta

Regarding business expenses, I just do it. If it is from kijiji I just print the ad, It's not like I am lying or trying to rip anyone off. I consider it legitimate until someone tells me otherwise.

And maybe it is because I went mostly to country schools, but I have from day one maintained that I would haul my kids out of school if they every hit some horrible wall of bullying or evil teacher which I could not get around. We have not hit that point -quite the opposite -  but while I agree with you that we need to compel the public system to do better, sometimes that only goes so far.

Case in point, one of our kids is actually under consideration for an advanced program, and a teacher friend we are talking to about it said "it all comes down to the teacher". I agree with him.

I think it applies to consuming too. I prefer to make, do myself, or barter rather than buy, in business as well as at home, despite the economic theory that paying others to do stuff is more efficient, even if you can do it just as well or better.

And I'd say even if we buy, we have to be engaged with what we use if we don't want to risk getting fed some sort of garbage that is profitable for the business selling, but not necessarily good for us. That applies to everything from school to computers to contracted services to apples.

 

 

 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

A basic 15 inch screen laptop should be available for just over $300 - but online, yeah, maybe around $200 if you're lucky.

I'm using a Dell Inspiron 1525 that I brought online from Dell five or six years ago for about $500+ but with a spare battery and a cloth carrying case. Dell has them now for $399. with the latest chips and huge memory, but I think HP or others have the same basic laptop for no more than $300 or less.

I've decided to keep my 1525 at least until we get broadband (maybe two or three years from now - who knows?) and then I'll be looking for a new laptop but hopefully I'll find one made by a company with a better human rights record.

Question: what computer maker has the best human rights record?

Sven Sven's picture

[quote=lagatta]

As for home-schooling, I have lots of qualms about that, not only because of the right-wing fundie nuts that attracts, but also because it is retrograde in that it is relying mostly on the free labour of women, instead of something that has been socialized. Badly socialized to be sure, and often downright unsuitable, but is taking something public back into the home rather than criticising the negative impacts of the current educational system really a socially-progressive approach? 

[/quote]
Because women do most of the work of child-rearing, should we also socialize that task as well?

6079_Smith_W

[quote=Sven]

Because women do most of the work of child-rearing, should we also socialize that task as well?

[/quote]

Not sure where you're going with that, Sven.

Personally, no, I think  the solution is to step up and share the work a bit, but I also think it is important that an existing public institution like schools be held to account.

And since you bring it up, I think universal childcare for those who need it would be a great idea. But I don't think that is an argument that keeping kids at home is by definition wrong. Again, I'm not sure what your point is.

 

Sven Sven's picture

[quote=6079_Smith_W]

[quote=Sven]

Because women do most of the work of child-rearing, should we also socialize that task as well?

[/quote]

Not sure where you're going with that, Sven.

Personally, no, I think  the solution is to step up and share the work a bit, but I also think it is important that an existing public institution like schools be held to account.

And since you bring it up, I think universal childcare for those who need it would be a great idea. But I don't think that is an argument that keeping kids at home is by definition wrong. Again, I'm not sure what your point is.

[/quote]

My point is that if socialization is the solution to a problem that women have a disproportionate burden of shouldering (home schooling), then why wouldn't socialization also be the solution for another problem that women have a disproportionate burden of shouldering (i.e., child-rearing)?

6079_Smith_W

Is that what lagatta said?

(and I'll leave that to her to answer)

But I thought the argument was rather specific to that case, and wasn't in any way a claim that the school was perfect.

Believe me my first option would be to try and get satisfaction within the school; after all, I AM paying for it, and it doesn't only concern the welfare of my kids.

In the strictest sense, I think public childcare SHOULD be there, not as the only option, and because of any assumption that it is better than care at home, but because it should be available for people who want it.

Besides, I don't think anyone is making an argument for universal public housecleaning, cooking, valet  and laundry services either, even though there's clearly an imbalance in that department too.

 

 

Sven Sven's picture

[quote=Boom Boom]

I've decided to keep my 1525 at least until we get broadband (maybe two or three years from now - who knows?) and then I'll be looking for a new laptop but hopefully I'll find one made by a company with a better human rights record.

[/quote]

I get broadband via satellite for 50 bucks a month.  If you have access to electricity, you can get it, at least in the US.  I would imagine there's a similar service in Canada?

Sven Sven's picture

[quote=6079_Smith_W]

Is that what lagatta said?

[/quote]

I was looking at her criticism of home-schooling because, among other things:

[quote=lagatta]

...it is retrograde in that it is relying mostly on the free labour of women, instead of something that has been socialized. Badly socialized to be sure, and often downright unsuitable, but is taking something public back into the home rather than criticising the negative impacts of the current educational system really a socially-progressive approach? 

[/quote]

Presumably, in-home child-rearing is also "retrograde" because "it is [also] relying mostly on the free labour of women"...

lagatta

Sven, I was referring specifically to "taking something public" (in this case universal free education) back into the home. Was that hard to read?

No, I don't think children have to be reared in kibbutzes. Yes, by the way, I think everywhere should have public universal childcare (as is theoretically the case here in Québec, but underfunding has allowed the private sector in, which will wind up costing us a lot). But no, I don't think parents should be forced to use it. 

Socialisation of unpaid domestic labour is an old feminist demand, by the way. How it should be achieved remains to be discussed, and fought for. 

I most certainly do not think women remaining in the home all their lives and depending on the income of a male breadwinner should be the norm in this day and age. I'm old enough to remember when that model was pretty much imposed, and my first revolts as a very young teen were against that crap. 

What is pleasant nowadays is that I see parents a generation younger than I am who were themselves reared with far more egalitarian expectations, and who are raising their own children differently. Quite a few feminists of my cohort swore we would never have children because we didn't want to fall into the trap our mums and other older female relatives fell into. Nowadays I think that fear is far less, and many young feminists are happily contemplating having children. 

 

lagatta

Back to computers, can any of you tell me if this is up-to-date enough to be worth buying? I much prefer Macs, if I can afford one (far fewer problems using them - I am NOT a techy type)

Macbook 2009 black 13" 2GB RAM, 2.4 GHz, 250 GB disc

Mac OS X Lion version 10.7. Coming with a new charger, and one year old battery.

Note that this is not a "MacBook Pro", the latest one. I need to do word processing, use virtual dictionaries and take part in some audio-video conferencing. 

6079_Smith_W

Sounds not bad, so long as you aren't going to be building any huge databases. As for the audio video, I have been able to do that with computers with less than that, but a Mac geek might be of a different mind about it. I run linux.

 

Otavano

I've never understood the (don't) do X on day Y. It just means you'll pass it on to another day. What good does that do? For real effect, it has to be a lifestyle change for every day.

lagatta

I'm not any kind of geek (except a word geek, of course). 

Otavano, symbolic days can be means of spotlighting causes and issues. May Day and International Women's Day come to mind, so does Pride week. 

We should always be standing for workers' rights, equality for women and respect for LGBT people, but alas reminders are needed. Buy Nothing Day was started in the US, where "Black Friday" had become a kind of mass psycosis and people were acutally trampled to death, including a temporary, foreign worker (a young Haitian man) who was working as a store security guard. 

Caissa

I did not spend any money on Black Friday.

Otavano

I took my Mom out to a restaurant on Black Friday. It's only then I realised it even was Black Friday. Man I need to watch more TV I guess.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

[quote=Sven]

I get broadband via satellite for 50 bucks a month.  If you have access to electricity, you can get it, at least in the US.  I would imagine there's a similar service in Canada?

[/quote]

There's an outfit on the coast here selling Xplornet satellite internet, but it's expensive - over $400 for the initial setup, then $75 - $90 a month after. I'm on disability - I get a phone line and dialup internet for $54 a month, no initial cost. My neighbours like Xplornet but complain about reception, and the system goes down occasionally.

Michelle

I think the main thing BND is trying to do is to get people to NOT hit the Black Friday sales, and therefore not stock up on a bunch of crap they don't need (and step all over each other in a consumerist frenzy).

I get it, but some people are fanatical about BND and figure they can't buy anything at all.  Oh no, I'll have to get my prescription filled tomorrow!  That kind of thing.  That's kind of silly, for exactly the reason Otavano states - if you don't buy it today, you'll just buy it tomorrow with things you actually need.

On the other hand, spending money is such an unconscious, normalized thing that it can be an interesting wake-up call to try not to spend anything, just to be aware of how often we spend money.  So if people want to do it as a way of raising their own awareness, I figure it can't harm anything.  I know I could probably stand to spend less money!

Anyhow, I spent money on BND this year.  I bought stuff I needed.  Could have waited until the next day, but I had a ride to Costco from someone with a membership card and took advantage of it since I'm recovering from surgery and can't easily get around temporarily, and there is a product there that I needed that I can't get anywhere else.  No guilt.  Didn't hit any black Friday sales, though.  You couldn't pay me enough to do Black Friday.

Otavano

Also on Black Friday, before I even realized it was Black Friday, I happened by coincidence to pass by the local Native Friendship Centre. I'd been trying to learn Algonkin for awhile but the resources simply don't exist so I proposed they set up a fund to which the public can contribute to create self-instruction resources such as textbooks and dictionaries for those who want to learn it. I was told the information would be discussed by the administration later. Still no response yet but I'm sure these things take time.

So we don't need any special Day X for this kind of stuff. I more or less lived up to Black friday without even realizing it.

Caissa

My not spending money on Black Friday was unintentional. I had the day off from work, and other than walking to and from a doctor's appointment, I spent the day reading and listening to music.

6079_Smith_W

I think some of these people should actually check to see if what they are buying is a deal. I got hauled into Costco last year and was surprised to find that at over half the stuff was more expensive than the place I usually shop. I could only find a handful of items which were cheaper. And who is to say it actually WAS cheaper, when you factor in their membership, and the drive to the edge of town?

lagatta

Otavano, I'd love to hear more about that Algonkin programme. At Terres en Vues, an Innu course has been given, and Mohawk courses are also given in Montréal, at the Native Friendship Centre, I believe. 

Sadly, one can do far more extensive and high-level courses in Inuktitut and some other major Indigenous languages spoken in Canada in Paris, at the "Grande École" devoted to world languages (I'Institut des langues orientales, its name a holdover from the days of French colonies in Africa and Asia) than at any university faculty here in Québec. I believe Laval University offers some classes in First Peoples languages. 

Much more has to be done for First Peoples' language promotion. Indeed, this is just one example of the kind of cultural activity that can prove far more satisfactory than mindless "recreational shopping". 

A couple of neighbours are currently studying Spanish at a community centre just around the block. (The courses were too elementary for my needs). 

Michelle

Winston, for me it wasn't about cost.  It was about a supplement that I need since my surgery that I can't find in Canada except at Costco. :)  I haven't darkened the door of a Costco for years before last Friday.  It was just a coincidence that my chance to go happened to be then...

But yes, you have to be very careful.  If you have things you buy regularly, and you live near one, and you have a car, then a Costco membership is a good deal.  If not, then it's not.  And since I don't have a car, nor do I live near one, I have never bothered getting a membership.  I also know people who chip in on one membership and go together on a semi-regular basis to stock up on stuff that is a good deal for them.

Otavano

[quote=lagatta]

Otavano, I'd love to hear more about that Algonkin programme. At Terres en Vues, an Innu course has been given, and Mohawk courses are also given in Montréal, at the Native Friendship Centre, I believe. 

Sadly, one can do far more extensive and high-level courses in Inuktitut and some other major Indigenous languages spoken in Canada in Paris, at the "Grande École" devoted to world languages (I'Institut des langues orientales, its name a holdover from the days of French colonies in Africa and Asia) than at any university faculty here in Québec. I believe Laval University offers some classes in First Peoples languages. 

Much more has to be done for First Peoples' language promotion. Indeed, this is just one example of the kind of cultural activity that can prove far more satisfactory than mindless "recreational shopping". 

A couple of neighbours are currently studying Spanish at a community centre just around the block. (The courses were too elementary for my needs). 

[/quote]

 

I probably won't get a response for a while, but I just figured that the creation of self-instruction textbooks and dictionaries would be useful especially for those who can't get access to courses in a classroom environment. Honestly, I had no interest in funding such a thing since it would be expensive; I jsut wanted to buy the books. But if they don't exist, what option is there? Though I'm loking at it more through the eyes of a non-Algonkin who wants to learn the language, such resources might be useful for Algonkins speakrs too, especially those living away from home and wanting to brush up on their language.

6079_Smith_W

Michelle, that wasn't meant as a personal slight. Sorry if it may have sounded like it. I do have a problem with Costco. The fact that they only accept cash, debit or American Express (the ickiest credit card there is, IMO) is just one strike against them, plus the fact that they have security like a jail.. Even so, I really tried, and could only find a few items which I considered worth buying.

Strangely enough, one of those items - a jar of picked herring - actually went bad before I could open it, which tells me it wasn't properly preserved, and was more sugar than vinegar. I knew it wasn't as good as Ellman's but I did not expect that to happen.

 

Michelle

Oh, I didn't take it that way!  I was just agreeing with you in general. :)

lagatta

My problem with Costco is the whole "membership" thing, and those it excludes. For me it would be ludicrous anyway, as they are based on selling large quantities of stuff. I'm actually not very far at all from the Marché central location, but I can't see carting huge quantities of stuff back on my bike, Dutch panniers or not. And I'm just one human in the household. 

Neighbourhood shops, and certain other "ethnic" supermarkets such as PA (Greek) and Adonis (Lebanese seem to have far better buys on produce. So do the Asian supermarkets and shops, of course, but they don't seem very interested in the question of buying locally, even when it is possible. 

6079_Smith_W

Speaking of ethnic markets, I was rather shocked when I moved here to Saskatoon (from Vancouver and WInnipeg) to find that the best place for Indian/Middle Eastern was Superstore.THey were very well-stocked, unlike any of there stores I had been in elsewhere.

That has changed in the past 9 years, and there are now Pakistanin and Afghan markets, and even a Caribbean place here. Fortunately there always was a good supply of Oriental foods, including fresh tofu and a barbecue place, otherwise I would have been VERY frustrated.

Oddly enough, wnat still is missing here is European  - a real German butcher, and a mediterranean deli.

 

Sven Sven's picture

[quote=lagatta]

My problem with Costco is the whole "membership" thing, and those it excludes.

[/quote]

According to StatCan, the average Canadian household spends about $7,400 on food annually.

A "membership" at Costco is about $55 per year (or about 0.7% of what an average Canadian household is already spending on food).

So, the membership only "excludes" a household if the annual savings that household would see by purchasing from Costco is less than $55.

onlinediscountanvils

[quote=Sven]So, the membership only "excludes" a household if the annual savings that household would see by purchasing from Costco is less than $55.[/quote]

Does Costco allow you to pay the $55 membership at the [i]end[/i] of the one-year term, or do they require you to pay at the outset?

Sven Sven's picture

[quote=onlinediscountanvils]

[quote=Sven]So, the membership only "excludes" a household if the annual savings that household would see by purchasing from Costco is less than $55.[/quote]

Does Costco allow you to pay the $55 membership at the [i]end[/i] of the one-year term, or do they require you to pay at the outset?

[/quote]

I will concede this: If a household, after cutting out all non-essentials (cable TV; beer, wine, and other alcohol; restraurants; coffee shops; entertainment; etc.), is unable to save $55 to buy a Costco membership, then that household will not be able to take advantage of any Costco savings.

6079_Smith_W

I couldn't imagine buying everything I eat from Costco.

Aside from their meagre produce and over-the-top meat section there is very little that isn't completely processed and full of preservatives. Even their veggie burgers are more cheese than grain. I really think their main appeal must be to those who like name brand items.

And the gourmet quinoa notwithstanding,  it is as white as white can be.

 

Sven Sven's picture

[quote=6079_Smith_W]

I couldn't imagine buying everything I eat from Costco.

Aside from their meagre produce and over-the-top meat section there is very little that isn't completely processed and full of preservatives. Even their veggie burgers are more cheese than grain. I really think their main appeal must be to those who like name brand items.

And the gourmet quinoa notwithstanding,  it is as white as white can be.

[/quote]

I've never shopped at Costco (for food or otherwise).  But, if it is as bad as you describe, then I'm not sure why anyone would care if some people are "excluded" from shopping there because of a $55 annual "membership" fee.

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