Buy Nothing Day

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6079_Smith_W

Except that I can see how it is food heaven for some people. There are plenty of people whose idea of cooking is reheating some ready-made dish in the oven.

 

lagatta

Sven, I wasn't referring to the cost of membership - don't they exclude people who don't have a "steady income" and employer? Perhaps that has changed. They used to be quite restrictive. 

And since when is wine a non-essential?Wink

Sven Sven's picture

lagatta wrote:

And since when is wine a non-essential?Wink

Good point.  Scratch wine off of that list!!

Sven Sven's picture

Sven wrote:

onlinediscountanvils wrote:

Sven wrote:

So, the membership only "excludes" a household if the annual savings that household would see by purchasing from Costco is less than $55

Does Costco allow you to pay the $55 membership at the end of the one-year term, or do they require you to pay at the outset?

I will concede this: If a household, after cutting out all non-essentials (cable TV; beer, wine, and other alcohol; restraurants; coffee shops; entertainment; etc.), is unable to save $55 to buy a Costco membership, then that household will not be able to take advantage of any Costco savings.

 

Maysie - from another thread, referring to this thread wrote:

How does a non-progressive whose combined family income is in the six-figures claim to decide what is and is not essential expenses for lower income folks?

It's not me "deciding" what is essential and what is non-essential.  It's my opinion.  Besides, I suspect that common sense would lead most people to the conclusion that, generally, a 50" flat screen, or tickets to a baseball game, or $4 daily coffee drinks, or etc. are not "essentials".  To argue otherwise would be to argue that any purchase a person deems to be "essential" is, therefore, essential, which is absurd.

The broader point I was trying to make is this: If someone said, "I don't have $55 to pay for a membership at Costco -- how can I get the money for a membership like that?"  Well, if the person really wanted an answer to that question, the first thing they should do is look at what they are spending their money on now and then decide: "Is there $55 that I'm spending other things now that I'd rather spend on a $55 Costco membership?"

ryanw

I thought Costco memberships pay for themselves in savings from retail but also lead to overconsumption which negate those savings

its something of a dilemma, but somewhat less problematic to piggyback on someone else that has a membership and split the purchases across several couples

Sven Sven's picture

ryanw wrote:

I thought Costco memberships pay for themselves in savings from retail

Well, that's the theory...and something that each member has to decide for themselves.  If a person thinks they'll save at least $55, then buy the membership.  If not, don't.

ryanw wrote:

but also lead to overconsumption which negate those savings

But, that's entirely within the control of the member.

Bacchus

If you are poor you could take advantage of a Costco membership for savings but rarely would you have the $55 in any given month to get a membership.

 

Not without going without food for a large number of days I guess.

 

I had this argument with a friend of mine who couldnt see why anyone wouldnt go there. I said what if you had no money for the membership because bills and food ate all of your meager income? He since became unemployed and broke and understood when we discussed it again. Sadly a few weeks ago he killed himself with Helium

Sven Sven's picture

Bacchus wrote:

If you are poor you could take advantage of a Costco membership for savings but rarely would you have the $55 in any given month to get a membership.

Not without going without food for a large number of days I guess.

If a person wants the membership but cannot come up with the $55 today, then the person will have to put aside a small amount of money over time (so maybe they get the membership a year from now).  Only a very tiny fraction of people in Canada or the US would be unable to do that over time.  If a person cannot come up with $55 after, say, a year of saving, then they've far bigger problems than trying to get a membership at Costco.

Bacchus wrote:

I had this argument with a friend of mine who couldnt see why anyone wouldnt go there. I said what if you had no money for the membership because bills and food ate all of your meager income? He since became unemployed and broke and understood when we discussed it again. Sadly a few weeks ago he killed himself with Helium

I'm sorry to hear about your friend.  Very sad.

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