Fed up with Facebook? Ticked at Twitter? Diaspora* is up and running!

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radiorahim radiorahim's picture
Fed up with Facebook? Ticked at Twitter? Diaspora* is up and running!

Diaspora*, the free software based, privacy aware decentralized social networking service is up and running in "Alpha testing" mode.

Read more here.

Comments?

 

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

Interesting. I'm a gone check it out.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

The only thing that really ticks me off about FB is that their games are slow to load. All that other stuff - like the ticker feed - I basically ignore.  The new FB - called "Facebook Timeline" - debuts next month I think. I'll withhold judgdement until I actually get to use for it for a few days.

 

ETA: On principle there are problems to be had with FB simply because it's so in support of the establishment and capitalism. And things like 'data mining' ought to be of huge concern as well.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

If you want to learn more about the problems with internet privacy (or lack thereof), you should listen to Eben Moglen's presentation to the Internet Society of New York from February, 2010.   This is the presentation which inspired both Diaspora* and the Freedom Box Project.

This is the shortened version (8 minutes)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IoMefqcR4fo

 

This is full version: (57 minutes)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QOEMv0S8AcA

and the Q&A (58 minutes)

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kpHWnHxmnXg

 

Lachine Scot

Ah, I've  been hearing about Diaspora* for a while.  It seems like such great progress from commercial-minded stuff like Facebook.  Even the name is more sophisticated! I wonder what it will look like in a while--will it remain a sort of niche for certain kinds of people, like tumblr or livejournal? Or will it become popular across many types of people, like twitter?

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I read today that FB has 800 million subscribers. Unreal.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

I saw some number that Diaspora* has just passed the 100,000 user mark...yes pretty small, but it's still in "alpha testing" and most folks don't know about it yet.

Diapora* is fundamentally different from the other services you mention.   There is no central server at all.   The folks who set it up don't control it.

Don't think "client/server" the way you would on corporate social networking sites, but think "peer to peer" server...all servers being equal and talking to each other.   Anyone can set up a "pod" server...and I mean anyone.  You could set one up for yourself, your family and friends, a union, an organization or a company could set one up.  Even rabble could set one up!   The idea is to put your data up on a pod server that you trust.  You might only trust a pod server that you operate yourself.   That's okay!

If you are competent enough...or know someone who is competent enough at setting up a GNU/Linux web server, then you should be able to setup a Diaspora* pod server. 

When it's finished, Diaspora* will allow you to connect across various social networking sites.   Right now, you can post to Facebook, Twitter and Tumblr from within Diaspora*...although you can't get feeds from them yet.

So there are a couple of dozen "open" community servers that you can sign on to.  Best way to find out about it is to sign on and start playing with it...and invite your friends too!

Unclefred Unclefred's picture

It's suspicious as far as I'm concerned.  If someone wants to connect with me, they just have to email, or go to my figure skating bulletin board.

Sven Sven's picture

I don't use Twitter but I do have a FB account.

So, relative to FB, radiorahim, and from an average user's perspective, what are the three biggest benefits to Diaspora* versus FB?

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Sven wrote:

I don't use Twitter but I do have a FB account.

So, relative to FB, radiorahim, and from an average user's perspective, what are the three biggest benefits to Diaspora* versus FB?

Speaking for myself, I'd say the main benefits are privacy and ethical ones.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

One of the things that pisses me off about FB is that I'm typing a comment, and the page updates on its own and I lose whatever I was typing. I'm on dialup, and loading a page takes forever - sometimes I'm typing away not realizing that the page is still loading. FB can be a pain in the ass sometimes.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Privacy is the obvious one.  You can be as private as you want or as public as you want.  

Decentralization and no corporate control is another one.   There is no big corporation that is logging all of your activities and using that information to sell to advertisers.    Corporate controlled social networks are not "social networks".   They're data mining corporations.  

We give the data miners our personal information, they give us a little bit of free web hosting and they spy on us 24/7.

Free "as in freedom" software is important too.   Anyone can modify or change the software to improve it and extend it.

Also, you have the freedom to be anonymous if you want.  You aren't required to use your real name.

Anyway Sven, read the original post and watch the videos of Eben Moglen when you have the time.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

"Europe vs. Facebook" is an interesting site that looks at the kinds of personal data that Facebook collects on users and aggregates alot of the press that Facebook has been generating in Europe lately on lack of privacy for users.

Unionist

Interesting, RR. But have you tried the link below, and does it work - i.e. does it provide the same data that [url=http://www.facebook.com/help/contact.php?show_form=data_requests]this more formal request[/url] would do?

[url=https://www.facebook.com/help/?faq=212802592074644]How can I download my information from Facebook?[/url]

PS: I've followed the latter, and am waiting for my confirmation email to arrive saying they've archived my stuff and are ready to deliver.

ETA: Ok, it packed up a 86 MB zip file, seems to include my photos, videos, status updates - apparently they don't send my comments on other people's posts.

 

NDPP

 

Facebook Tracks Your Every Move

http://www.naturalnews.com/033713_Facebook_tracking.html

"...Facebook now monitors your online activity even when you are not logged in to the service. With each new change Facebook makes, users' privacy becomes a little less...nonexistent if you will..."

Unionist

In fairness, NDPP, it should be noted that the techie who discovered this has [url=http://nikcub.appspot.com/facebook-fixes-logout-issue-explains-cookies]p... an update[/url] about his discussions with Facebook and their efforts to explain and correct the issue. He concludes:

Quote:

Facebook has changed as much as they can change with the logout issue. They want to retain the ability to track browsers after logout for safety and spam purposes, and they want to be able to log page requests for performance reasons etc. I would still recommend that users clear cookies or use a separate browser, though. I believe Facebook when they describe what these cookies are used for, but that is not a reason to be complacent on privacy issues and to take initiative in remaining safe.

I discovered a lot of other issues and interesting areas ripe for further investigation while researching the cookie logout issue - and I will be taking each one of them up on the blog here in the near future.

I must thank Gregg Stefancik, an engineer at Facebook who reached out (and also left the 'official' Facebook response as a comment on the previous post) and who worked with us on this issue. Thank you as well to other Facebook engineers who reached out. On my end Ashkan Soltani and Brian Kennish (author of the excellent disconnect browser plugins that every user should be running) were invaluable with providing tests, advice and additional sets of eyes.

 

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Haven't tried the formal link but have tried the other one...no luck with it yet.   Keep seeing the "pending" notification.   Although I do know of others who've successfully downloaded their info.

I understand that lately FB has been overloaded by requests for personal data over the last few days so that could be it.

I understand that if you want to quit FB that you have to go through their account shutdown routine, then have absolutely no contact with the account at all for a period of 14 days and then it'll shut down.

On Diaspora* the process is quite simple.   Click a button to download your data from whatever pod server your on and it's done instantly.   Click another button to close your account and then it's closed.

One of the other benefits of Diaspora* that I forgot to mention in my original blogpost was that you can use a "handle" there just as you can here on babble.   With FB and Google+ you are expected to use your real name...and Google+ deleted a whole bunch of accounts where they thought someone wasn't using their real name.

Also, nobody is going to kick you off of Diaspora* if you're using it to try to organize a union.  You can use it to organize whatever the hell you want to organize.

 

Unionist

Hey RR, question:

In the Diaspora signup procedure, they ask this as an option:

Quote:

Connect to your other social networks

Connecting to services will allow you to publish out to these services. With Facebook, you also be able to find friends already on Diaspora and invite others.

Should I say "yes" or "no" to connect to Facebook? Or would that only allow a one-way transfer of FB data to Diaspora? As a rule I always click "no" to anything that asks permission to use my FB data.

 

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Unionist, that decision is up to you.

If you say yes, you'll be able to do a couple of things...namely post stuff on Facebook from Diaspora*.   The other more immediate thing is that it makes it easy for you to send Diaspora* invites to your Facebook friends so that you'll have some folks on Diaspora* to chat with.   I've allowed it on mine.   On the other hand, you just might find that some folks are willing to sign up for Diaspora* that aren't on FB :)

Down the road you'll be able to actually see your FB feed from Diaspora*.   The development team is still working on that feature.

 

One thing to remember when you're inviting folks to join is to tell them that Diaspora* is still "alpha testing" and so it's a work in progress.   They should very much expect it to be a little on the buggy side right now...but the way to make it unbuggy is for folks to use it. :)

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

When we started Diaspora two years ago, the project kicked off with amazing reception and support from people that believed in our ultimate goal: giving users ownership over their data. It’s a powerful idea, one that captured the imaginations of millions of people across the world. This vision has expanded and evolved over the past two years that we have been working on it as the project has grown.

Diaspora* began when we were still at NYU – just four guys trying to scratch our own itch. We had an idea about how social networks could work in a new and exciting way. We intended to be done over the course of a summer, and with an expected budget of $10,000 from our Kickstarter campaign. The reception of this idea was so good that we managed to reach 20 times the expected amount in donations, and the project expanded to cover far more than just a summer. It’s been over two years now, and we are proud of what Diaspora has become.

Today, the network has grown into thousands of people using our software in hundreds of installations across the web. There are hundreds of pods that have been created by community members, and it has become one of the biggest Github projects to date. It has been translated to almost fifty languages, with hundreds of developers worldwide contributing back to the project.

Diaspora has grown into something more than just a project four guys started in their office at school. It is bigger than any one of us, the money we raised, or the code we have written. It has developed into something that people all over the world care about and are inspired by. We think the time is right to reflect this reality, and put our code where our hearts lie.

Today, we are giving control of Diaspora to the community.

 

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

This is great news!   It shows that the project has matured into something much bigger than the four NYU students who started it all.

It looks like it will evolve into something like "The Document Foundation" which oversees the Libre Office project...or the "Freedom Box Foundation" which oversees the Freedom Box project.

Left Turn

Diaspora sounds like a great idea, and I joined it back in the spring, only to  find to my disappointment that precisely zero of my Facebook friends are on it. Doesn't do me much good if I can't use it to connect with my friends and family.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Left Turn wrote:

Diaspora sounds like a great idea, and I joined it back in the spring, only to  find to my disappointment that precisely zero of my Facebook friends are on it. Doesn't do me much good if I can't use it to connect with my friends and family.

Well they don't miraculously get on it if they've never heard of it.   The mainstream media isn't exactly in the habit of reporting on user controlled distributed social networks that aren't controlled by billionaires.    Send them an invite and ask them to join.    Hey, even kick in a few bucks to help it grow.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

(I found this posted on Diaspora*)

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

If anyone on here wants to join me on Diaspora* just follow this link:  

 

https://diasp.org/i/c0059bb37c0a

Slumberjack

I've reduced my fb profile and content down to barebones info and family contacts.  Seriously considering ditching it entirely, as most family have my house number, and they all have phone service.  And besides...I speak with my mom at least once a week, which is often better than the daily feed, and just as graphic sometimes.

Slumberjack

But yeah I noticed most family members who had previously transcribed their daily lives to fb have pared back significantly to a few profile photos and minimal info.  Maybe diaspora represents a social networking option.

Slumberjack

I was functioning in the peer to peer server world, which is vastly superior in terms of user interface, control and privacy...starting about 13 years ago with the release of a FPS game from Novalogic.  A handful of diehards of the particular game we were using from that era still operate servers all over the world despite the fact that Novalogic eventually disbanded it's rental server option, game menu linkages, and support desk.  Mine was a 24/7 family friendly server, at least as far as FPS games go, governed for profanity by a user created application called 'judge dread,' where I'd enter all the curse words I could think of, and when they'd pop up in the chat between gamers a mod message would be sent out to stop or suffer the consequences...which at first was a punt out of the server, followed up with a ban for further abuses, according to what was already recorded in the banlog.  Later as technology progressed, ISPs would have rotating IPs which were troublesome to protect against at first, until we began to use IP wallmaster software.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Eben Moglen says that we made the web easy to read with the web browser but we didn't make the web easy to write...and thus the "thug in a hoodie" (as he refers to Mark Zuckerberg) created Facebook where the web is easy to write in exchange for 24/7 spying.

He say that the task is to make things like Facebook obsolete with federated peer to peer social networking instead of centralized corporate controlled social networking.   Diaspora* certainly is one very good effort.  Friendica is another that I've learned about.

mark_alfred

I use Linux, and I tried to install and run Friendica, and then Diaspora, on my computer, and I failed.  I have a static IP address with high speed, so I can run a home web server.  However, these are not easy programs to set up.

I joined the Diaspora link you gave, so I'll try it out.  I'm not a huge fan of social networking though.  It's only recently that I've activated a Facebook account to appease some of my friends.  I also did try out the test site of Friendica -- it is a better program than Diaspora, I think. 

However, I don't think there's much hope in either Diaspora or Friendica overtaking Facebook anytime soon.  Most people would not be able to set it up on their own computer (and wouldn't wish to pay extra for a static IP address to run a web server), and most people would also not be willing to pay extra to have one of these programs hosted on a remote server.  So, that leaves trusting a smaller community server or a technically efficient friend to host your social networking account.  However, most people would not wish to trust their life's memories to a smaller server due to the worry of the server going belly-up and disappearing.  Losing precious baby, kitten, family, and friend memorabilia to a vanished server would piss people off.  So in that regard, bigger would be seen as more secure.

While I worry about stuff with Facebook regarding user's information being a commodity to be sold for big business, I think the reality (as is being borne out in the declining market value of Facebook) is that the value of such a mass of information really is not as high as people first imagined.  It is turning out to not be the great market research tool of value that some people initially assumed it was going to be.  I think that the end of Facebook will not be due to a collection of smaller servers running a clone of it in pods (IE, Diaspora or Friendica) but rather it simply withering away and dying like AOL did.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Setting up web servers of any kind at home isn't easy...let alone setting up a social networking web server.   That's why the faux corporate social networking services (really data mining businesses) have had such a good run in recent years.

As Eben Moglen says frequently these days, the web browser made the web easy to read but not easy to write.

That's the challenge for the free software community.    Make the web easy to write.

The Freedom Box Project, which is still in very early stages aims to do exactly that.   They're creating the software that will allow everyone to have cheap portable "plug servers" that can store and encrypt all of your personal data.   The Debian GNU/Linux community is very actively involved in developing the Freedom Box

I don't have a problem with social networking at all.    I think it's a good thing.   What I'm opposed to is corporate data mining services that pretend to be social networks.

In any case the web is only 20 years old and it's final history hasn't been written.   Fifteen years ago, most people read the web with a proprietary web browser.    Now, most people read the web with either a free software browser or  a browser that runs on a free software engine.

Writing the web without giving away your personal data to the data miners is going to get easier.

 

mark_alfred

The Freedom Box project looks interesting.  The idea of better encryption is good.  If the ability to remove traces of oneself from the Internet can be developed and given to people, then that too would be good.  For instance, when in a pub or cafe, we may say stupid stuff, but it's not there forever to bite one in the ass later, whereas a lot of internet conversations are.  The freedom to err (and to err is human) is preserved.  Thus the freedom to be human is preserved.

Mind you, I'm not sure how I feel about the proprietary vs open source debate.  Even though I use Linux exclusively (and have done so for ten years since my overpriced Windows computer broke), the idea of shifting development of software from paid employees to worldwide volunteers seems almost too akin to workfare.  That trend of using free labour has sifted over into other industries.  Just a while ago I saw an advertisement for an "internship" for data entry clerks.  The labour situation is horrendous now.

Anyway, the Freedom Box does look good.  Have others from here joined the Diaspora Pod?

mark_alfred

radiorahim wrote:

Setting up web servers of any kind at home isn't easy...let alone setting up a social networking web server.   That's why the faux corporate social networking services (really data mining businesses) have had such a good run in recent years.

Writing the web without giving away your personal data to the data miners is going to get easier.

 

There's an interesting article about Diaspora here where they touch on the issue of whether something is convenient or not is perhaps the biggest obstacle to freedom and protection of privacy:

Quote:
Indeed, since the birth of the information age, argues Tim Wu, a recent F.T.C. advisor and a law professor who propagated the idea of “net neutrality” – of keeping the Internet’s pipes free of top-down restrictions – we’ve readily sacrificed freedom for something far more seductive and perhaps, easily recognizable: convenience.

 

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Quote:
Mind you, I'm not sure how I feel about the proprietary vs open source debate.  Even though I use Linux exclusively (and have done so for ten years since my overpriced Windows computer broke), the idea of shifting development of software from paid employees to worldwide volunteers seems almost too akin to workfare.  That trend of using free labour has sifted over into other industries.  Just a while ago I saw an advertisement for an "internship" for data entry clerks.  The labour situation is horrendous now.

This is where you would be quite wrong.

All kinds of folks get paid to write free software.    Do you think that the folks who work for Google, Red Hat, IBM etc. who contribute code to the Linux kernel don't get paid?   These companies all pour millions of dollars into Linux kernel development because their business models depend on free software.

Canonical pays all kinds of employees to contribute source code to various desktop software for the Ubuntu GNU/Linux operating system.

Linus Torvalds, inventor of the Linux kernel is paid by the Linux Foundation to oversee the continuing development of the Linux kernel...and paid quite well I might add.

Even Microsoft has paid employees who contribute code to the Linux kernel...even if only for selfish reasons...making it easier for organizations to virtualize Microsoft Windows Server inside of GNU/Linux servers...or vice versa.

The Swiss government developed court document processing software and released it under version the GPLv3 license...the most copyleft of copyleft software licenses.    Of course proprietary software companies tried to block the government from freeing the software.

This means that other governments are free to modify the Swiss software to develop their own court document processing software (as long as of course they release the source code of their modified software).

This helps to break the hold that proprietary software companies have on governments and allows them to use (usually) unionized public sector employees to develop court processing software of their own at much less cost.

The new Socialist Party government in France is now making noises about increasing the use of free software in government.    Some of the money they save will be used to support various free software projects that are of use to governments.

Of course Brazil has probably led the world in adopting free software for government operations.

Have a look at the careers section of the Mozilla Foundation.    They pay people to work on Firefox and Firefox is licensed under a free software license.

Some free software projects like Diaspora* are "crowd sourced".    The Diaspora Project initially raised money on Kickstarter to pay four NYU students to do the initial coding of Diaspora*    The Freedom Box Project has been crowd sourced via Kickstarter too.

Some free software projects have been funded through Google's more or less "charitable arm"...the Google "Summer of Code".

For the longest time "The Gimp" was a totally volunteer project...and got some "Summer of Code" money so some folks could put in some serious time on the latest Verison 2.8

And yes there are many free software projects that rely totally on volunteers...sometimes just a single programmer...just because they happen to have "an itch to scratch".    Or, sometimes a volunteer programmer just creates a little "add on" to an existing free software project.

Many artists create art of various kinds simply to express their creativity without a single thought of ever making a cent.   

This very site runs on the free software Drupal content management system.

The free software model works, because there are hundreds of thousands of software programmes for every purpose you can think of as proof.

 

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Quote:
There's an interesting article about Diaspora here where they touch on the issue of whether something is convenient or not is perhaps the biggest obstacle to freedom and protection of privacy:

Yes that's a pretty interesting article.  Perceived convenience is an incredible obstacle to building alternatives to data mining corporate controlled faux social networks and it's also an obstacle to getting rid of proprietary software.

But, we should always keep trying to create and support efforts to build alternatives.

I might add that I support the free software movement for many of the same reasons that I support the labour movement.    It's quite true these days that the labour movement is probably losing more battles than winning, but I don't advocate throwing in the towel.   We should keep fighting for the things we believe in and hopefully, gradually we can contribute to the political pendulum swinging in a more positive direction.

mark_alfred

The Share option (aka AddThis) at the top of Rabble articles gives users a chance to utilize other sharing services besides Facebook or Twitter.  But, when I checked it, even though there appears to be over a hundred different options (including stuff like StumbleUpon or Orkut), neither Diaspora nor Friendica are listed.  So, even Rabble is not paying any heed to Diaspora.  But, if Rabble wishes to list a share button for it, then ...

Here's a Diaspora share button:  http://simounet.github.com/Diaspora-Share-Button/

Here's another one:  http://sharetodiaspora.github.com/about/

I couldn't find any for Friendica.

 

Users themselves can add sharing function with a Firefox addon.

Unionist

[url=http://motherboard.vice.com/2012/10/2/what-happened-to-the-facebook-kill... happened to Diaspora*, the Facebook killer? It's complicated.[/url]

 

Sven Sven's picture

Unionist wrote:

[url=http://motherboard.vice.com/2012/10/2/what-happened-to-the-facebook-kill... happened to Diaspora*, the Facebook killer? It's complicated.[/url]

That was really a very interesting report on the (short) life of Diaspora*.

Very early in the report, you will find this comment: "...we’ve readily sacrificed freedom for something far more seductive and perhaps, easily recognizable: convenience."

I think many folks erroneously discount the importance that convenience plays in most people's decisions in life.

Do people want to run into a shop and buy clothes off the rack, even clothes that may be made in China and sold in Walmart, or do they want to sew their own clothing?

Do people wish they could still buy cars that they could tinker with and fix themselves or do they want far more complex and less user-friendly vehicles (from a tinkering and fixing perspective) but that works flawlessly, year after year after year?

Do people want a laptop, like a Mac, that does exactly what they want it to do everytime they flip up the screeen or do people want to use hardware and software that isn't produced by a big corporation but may require futzing around with it all of the time?

Do people want to go from one shop to another to find the best price for a product that they want or do they want to pop online and find what they are looking for instantly -- and then have it delivered right to their front door?

Do people want to cut down their own trees, plane their own lumber, and make their furniture or do they want to run into IKEA?

Facebook does what I want it to do: Keep connected with distant friends and family.  I am unconcerned about the privacy issue -- I don't put anything out there that I wouldn't want anyone to see.  It's easy to use and works all of the time.

I think I'm like most people: I like convenience.  I like things that are simple to use.  I like things that work reliably.  And, companies like Apple, Toyota, Facebook, Amazon, IKEA, etc. deliver that time after time.

Until an "alternative system" can offer that same convenience, easy of use, and reliable performance, most people are not going to be interested in it.

Unionist

Whoops - I was lazy - didn't realize that mark_alfred had already posted the same article in October! I guess I sacrificed diligence for convenience. Embarassed

 

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Sven, there are two words in the title of the linked post that you don't seem to understand...namely "It's complicated".   Maybe you've seen this in some of your Facebook friends relationship status and didn't understand it.

So I guess that's why you cherry picked a very small section of the article to justify your purchase of pricey iToys, shopping at Walmart, IKEA ad nauseum.

 

Sven Sven's picture

radiorahim wrote:

Sven, there are two words in the title of the linked post that you don't seem to understand...namely "It's complicated".   Maybe you've seen this in some of your Facebook friends relationship status and didn't understand it.

So I guess that's why you cherry picked a very small section of the article to justify your purchase of pricey iToys, shopping at Walmart, IKEA ad nauseum. 

I read the article and it was "complicated".

I'm not endeavoring to justify any purchases I make to anyone.  Rather, I'm endeavoring to explain that people, generally, put a very high level of importance on convenience (and reliability and ease of use) and that many people fail to acknowledge, understand, or believe that.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Sven, did you ever actually join Diaspora*?   Or are you just talking out of your ass.

Sven Sven's picture

radiorahim wrote:

Sven, did you ever actually join Diaspora*?


Yep. User name lorentjd.

onlinediscountanvils

[url=http://readwrite.com/2012/12/11/why-are-dead-people-liking-stuff-on-face... Are Dead People Liking Stuff On Facebook?[/url]

onlinediscountanvils

[url=http://news.cnet.com/8301-13578_3-57559710-38/instagram-says-it-now-has-... says it now has the right to sell your photos[/url]

Quote:
Instagram said today that it has the perpetual right to sell users' photographs without payment or notification, a dramatic policy shift that quickly sparked a public outcry.

The new intellectual property policy, which takes effect on January 16, comes three months after Facebook completed its acquisition of the popular photo-sharing site. Unless Instagram users delete their accounts before the January deadline, they cannot opt out.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

We are going to continue having these kinds of problems with all corporate controlled centralized social networking services.  Its the nature of the beast.

And it's why we need alternatives.

 

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Here is a long (about an hour) interview with Sean Tilley, director of "open sourcery" for the Diaspora* Project.    Tilley talks about issues concerning personal privacy, the technical side of putting together a project like this and how you govern an open project like Diaspora*

listen here

Or you can download the mp3 file and listen with the media player of your choice (no flashplayer needed) from this link