no pipeline, no tankers, no problem 2

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kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

When coal was king people scoffed at the idea of replacing it with oil products. Transitions take a couple of decades. Canadians should invest in the future not the past.

Enough of the stupid red herrings to deflect conversations. Who the fuck ever said that Sweden was bad and why is it in this conversation except as a deflection from the fact that you can't advocate burning the tar sands without being a climate change denier. Sorry if that offends people who like to maintain the illusion of balance but IMO its like you can't be a "mens rights" advocate without being a misogynist no matter how you spin an argument.

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..from wpg

..mp jim carr's office

..portage place

Martin N.

The IEA estimates that global energy consumption will grow at ~2% per annum and that oil demand will continue to grow. Perhaps you are a tad premature with that couple of decades prediction. I am invested in quite a few renewables producers but the fact, fact, mind you, remains that global technology is not yet advanced enough to produce affordable non-fossil energy products unless, you smoke a lot of doobies and listen to Elon Musk speeches.

The time for change will be announced when D. Suzuki swans about the globe on an environmentally friendly hovercraft powered by the laughter of children rather than his usual thirsty dinosaur juice fuelled jet.

Pondering

Martin N. wrote:

The IEA estimates that global energy consumption will grow at ~2% per annum and that oil demand will continue to grow. Perhaps you are a tad premature with that couple of decades prediction. I am invested in quite a few renewables producers but the fact, fact, mind you, remains that global technology is not yet advanced enough to produce affordable non-fossil energy products unless, you smoke a lot of doobies and listen to Elon Musk speeches.

The time for change will be announced when D. Suzuki swans about the globe on an environmentally friendly hovercraft powered by the laughter of children rather than his usual thirsty dinosaur juice fuelled jet.

Even if that is true some oil must stay in the ground. There is no shortage. Alberta would like anyone else to be the ones to leave oil in the ground. That's not going to happen because the competition will always be able to undercut Alberta pricing.  That is just the reality of the world market in oil. It's the free market so beloved by Conservatives. We shouldn't interfere.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Canada leads G7 in oil and gas subsidies: new report

Canada provides more government support for oil and gas companies than any other G7 nation and is among the least transparent about fossil fuel subsidies, a new report reveals.

“Fossil fuel subsidies undermine carbon pricing, work against the achievement of Canada’s climate targets, encourage more fossil fuel exploration and production, and allocate scarce public resources away from other priorities like health care, education and renewable energy,” says the report, which ranks the progress of G7 countries in meeting their pledge to phase out fossil fuel subsidies by 2025.

quote:

The exception was Alberta — the heart of Canada’s oil and gas industry — where people polled were concerned about the economic impacts of removing government support for oil and gas corporations.

Even so, 48 per cent of Albertans polled disagreed with public subsidies for oil and gas companies.

“We need to be attentive to these perspectives and concerns of the workers and the communities that are most impacted by efforts to reduce carbon pollution,” said Patrick DeRochie, climate change and energy program manager for Environmental Defence, one of the groups that sponsored the new poll.

quote:

“Canada has refused to open up its books to the Auditor General himself,” DeRochie pointed out.

Auditor General Michael Ferguson noted in his May 2017 annual report that he was unable to obtain key documents and budget analyses from Finance Canada to determine what progress had been made toward Canada’s commitment to eliminate subsidies to fossil fuel companies.

“Canadians should be able to know what the government is using their money for, especially when it goes to something like oil and gas companies that are polluting, that are causing climate change and that are becoming a real liability in terms of tar sands cleanup in the future,” DeRochie said.

Germany and the U.S. scored the highest on transparency out of the G7 nations, while Canada is the least transparent nation after Italy.

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Aisha Badru - Fossil Fuels

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31 chapters take part in 'Stop the KM buyout' actions!

Thirty-one Council of Canadians chapters took part in actions across the country today in opposition to the Trudeau government's plan to spend billions of dollars to buy and expand the Kinder Morgan Trans Mountain pipeline.

Here are some photos.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..looks like at least 100 people not 50. noisy bunch to boot. :)

WATCH: Canadians protest at MP's office against Trans Mountain pipeline

About 50 protesters gathered outside federal Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould's constituency office in Vancouver on Monday to oppose the federal government's offer of $4.5 billion to buy pipeline assets from Texas-based energy giant Kinder Morgan.

They were among protests that Jolan Bailey, one of three LeadNow campaigners who organized a Day of Action, said were aimed at showing Prime Minister Justin Trudeau his Liberal party is in danger of losing tens of thousands of voters next election. Protesters also gathered at MPs' offices in Calgary, London, Ont. and other cities.

Outside Wilson-Raybould's office, 18-year-old Khalid Boudreau said he expects pipeline opponents to make a difference in the next election.

"Come 2019 every one of these people is registered to vote, and they're going to vote... we're going to turf (Trudeau) out of office," he said.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

The great Canadian climate delusion

quote:

It’s not entirely about climate change, of course. Many people in British Columbia oppose the Trans Mountain pipeline because of the risk of ruptures along the pipeline’s route or of bitumen spills from tankers in coastal waters. Many Indigenous peoples don’t want the pipeline crossing their lands. But most opponents also find the project’s implications for global warming to be a deal breaker in and of itself.

For these opponents, further massive investment in the extraction and export of some of the most carbon-intensive fossil fuel on Earth is nonsensical – idiotic, even. In a dangerously warming world, we should be investing in a clean-energy future, not entrenching Canada more deeply in the economic past.

Continued investment in the oil sands generally, and in the Trans Mountain pipeline specifically, means Canada is doubling down on a no-win bet. We’re betting that the world will fail to meet the reduction targets in the Paris Climate Agreement, thus needing more and more oil, including our expensive and polluting bitumen. We’re betting, in other words, on climate disaster. If, however, the world finally gets its act together and significantly cuts emissions, then Canada will lose much of its investment in the oil sands and the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion, because the first oil to be cut will be higher-cost oil such as ours.

Heads or tails, we lose. That’s the idiocy of it. We can’t have our lucrative oil sands profits and a safe climate, too.

This isn’t just rhetoric. Canada has no plan to meet its 2030 Paris Agreement emission targets, because it’s virtually impossible to do so if the oil sands’ output rises to Alberta’s cap of 100 million tonnes of carbon dioxide emissions a year. Under the agreement, the global oil market won’t have room for our oil, either. Scenarios to limit warming to 2 degrees, the Paris Agreement’s bottom-line target, clearly show that oil demand must decline.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Martin N. wrote:

The IEA estimates that global energy consumption will grow at ~2% per annum and that oil demand will continue to grow. Perhaps you are a tad premature with that couple of decades prediction. I am invested in quite a few renewables producers but the fact, fact, mind you, remains that global technology is not yet advanced enough to produce affordable non-fossil energy products unless, you smoke a lot of doobies and listen to Elon Musk speeches.

The time for change will be announced when D. Suzuki swans about the globe on an environmentally friendly hovercraft powered by the laughter of children rather than his usual thirsty dinosaur juice fuelled jet.

Your facts are bullshit so don't try to pass them off on me. The fact is that all over the globe governments are making investments in alternate technologies but in our pathetic petro state we are enabling foreign corporations to extract bitumen without charging them more than a pittance in royalties and we are going to build them a pipeline out of the public purse. Idiots like you pretend this is a plan to stop climate change but never explain how it is supposed to work.

Tran Mountain was not a viable economic choice to sink tons of capital into that is why the oligarchy is not funding it. My only question given the Liberal history with adscam federally and BC Rail provincially is which backroom operators are on the take in this pillage of the public purse.

progressive17 progressive17's picture

US Oil reserves, 36 billion barrels.
US Oil consumption, 7.21 billion barrels in 2016.
36/7.21 = 5 years.
World oil reserves are estimated at 1,688 billion barrels, which is enough for 52 years at current global consumption. As the number of cars increases by 7-8% every year, it could very well be there will be no oil by 2050 anyway.

Martin N.

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Martin N. wrote:

The IEA estimates that global energy consumption will grow at ~2% per annum and that oil demand will continue to grow. Perhaps you are a tad premature with that couple of decades prediction. I am invested in quite a few renewables producers but the fact, fact, mind you, remains that global technology is not yet advanced enough to produce affordable non-fossil energy products unless, you smoke a lot of doobies and listen to Elon Musk speeches.

The time for change will be announced when D. Suzuki swans about the globe on an environmentally friendly hovercraft powered by the laughter of children rather than his usual thirsty dinosaur juice fuelled jet.

Your facts are bullshit so don't try to pass them off on me. The fact is that all over the globe governments are making investments in alternate technologies but in our pathetic petro state we are enabling foreign corporations to extract bitumen without charging them more than a pittance in royalties and we are going to build them a pipeline out of the public purse. Idiots like you pretend this is a plan to stop climate change but never explain how it is supposed to work.

Tran Mountain was not a viable economic choice to sink tons of capital into that is why the oligarchy is not funding it. My only question given the Liberal history with adscam federally and BC Rail provincially is which backroom operators are on the take in this pillage of the public purse.

Whadayamean TM isn't a"viable economic choice"? The rest of the Kinder Morgan Canada shareholders and I just made a killing on it.

I'm hanging on to my shares because Mr. Dressup will be getting rid of it for peanuts just before the next election and claiming a win for the environment. He will win another majority by delving deep into his tickle trunk to find his feminine side. His colourful frocks will render anti-pipeline malingerers irrelevant and ignored.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Martin N. wrote:

Whadayamean TM isn't a"viable economic choice"? The rest of the Kinder Morgan Canada shareholders and I just made a killing on it.

I guess this is why I have so little time for your views. You think shareholder value is a measure of economic value. This pipeline is indeed a windfall for the Texas scam artists ands their ride along carpet baggers like you. For the rest of Canada it always was and still is a very bad economic decision.

Martin N.

Maybe you should get your head out and actually look at the profitability of Trans Mountain instead of making stuff up. I am not in favour of government nationalizing private assets but Trudeau's naive belief that he could have it both ways with the ecoloons put him in the position of putting up or shutting up. 

 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

I have looked at the profitablity of this project and it is not viable.

Martin N.

Supporting information

  • The world’s population is expected to exceed nine billion people by 2040, resulting in increased demand for all forms of energy. Oil and natural gas is expected to represent 52 per cent of the total energy mix, according to the International Energy Agency.
    Total world oil consumption is expected to increase to 105 million barrels per day (b/d) by 2040, compared to 94 million b/d in 2016.
    Natural gas consumption will rise 45 per cent in 2040 to 199 trillion cubic feet (Tcf) versus 129 million Tcf in 2016.
  • Canada’s existing pipeline network is currently operating at capacity at four million b/d. CAPP forecasts the annual supply of western Canadian oil will rise to 5.4 million b/d by 2030, an increase of 1.5 million b/d from 2016.
  • Ontario, Quebec and Atlantic Canada import 600,000 b/d from the United States, Africa, and the Middle East, and another 2.4 billion cubic feet per day of natural gas.
  • Oil and natural gas is Canada’s largest export industry, creating nearly $110 billion in gross domestic product (GDP) and generating more than 500,000 jobs across the country.

The Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP)
 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Major oil spill could expose a million people to benzene, Vancouver council hears

Up to a million people could be exposed to unsafe levels of benzene, a chemical used to dilute bitumen, in the event of a major oil spill in Vancouver Harbour.

This was one of the risks presented to Vancouver council today (May 27) as the city submitted its evidence to the National Energy Board regarding the proposed expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline by Kinder Morgan.

Briefing council about input provided by various experts, deputy city manager Sadhu Johnston noted that a major oil leakage could cause significant air quality and health issues.

According to Johnston’s presentation, one scenario would see up to 31,000 people exposed to benzene levels that would cause health impacts.

quote:

The report also addressed Kinder Morgan’s assertion that it has a good history of pipeline safety.

The presentation noted that a spill occured in 1953, on the day the Trans Mountain pipeline began operation.

From 1961 to 2013, there were 81 spills reported to the NEB, according to the report, which averaged 1.5 times per year.

"Spills of nearly 6 million litres have been uncontained," Johnston's report went on.

The senior city manager also noted that Kinder Morgan's risk assessment is "flawed" and does not provide the full extent of the potential dangers of an oil spill "by excluding high consequence events (such as a tanker spill in Burrard Inlet)".

"A spill at the terminal or in the Inlet over any 50-year period has a 79 to 87 per cent likelihood," the report stated.

NDPP

Here's our database tracking how Indigenous communities are affected by Trans Mountain

https://t.co/jqp78S8JqL

"The lands, resources and rights of more than 130 Indigenous communities and groups from Alberta's oilsands to BC's coast could be affected..."

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Of course some climate change deniers say that this is not the future but merely a radical dream that wil not happen in fifty years. Oh well some people just don't like science and prefer to get their view of the world from MBA graduates.

https://www.greencarreports.com/news/1117111_electric-trucks-coming-from...

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Premier Notley’s claimed $15 billion annual benefit from Trans Mountain exposed as false by her own budget

Alberta Premier Rachel Notley has consistently repeated that the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is worth “about $15 billion a year” — a figure her office says she picked up from a Scotiabank report released last February.

The Scotiabank figure has been discredited. The bank ignored how the industry actually works to develop its claim and Ms. Notley knows it.

quote:

Shortly after adopting the $15 billion a year mantra last February, Ms. Notley issued her annual Budget: Alberta's 2018-21 Fiscal Plan.

If Ms. Notley’s claimed benefits from Trans Mountain’s expansion were credible, it would be reasonable to expect that her formal budget document would provide more insight into how the figure was developed. So I checked. It does not.

Instead, Ms. Notley’s Budget says the exact opposite of what she claims will come from Trans Mountain’s expansion. According to the Budget, Trans Mountain’s expansion will produce no benefit at all — that’s right, no benefit.

The Budget explains that the reason why Trans Mountain’s expansion will deliver no economic benefit to Alberta, or the rest of Canada, is because any potential pricing gain from increased pipeline capacity will be swamped by significant heavy oil pricing problems that are looming on the horizon.

quote:

Alberta’s Budget identifies that the price impact of IMO 2020 will be about $8 US per barrel. What this means is that instead of the promised narrowing of differentials from Trans Mountain’s expansion, Alberta actually expects none.

Ms. Notley is deliberately misleading Albertans into a false belief about the importance of Trans Mountain’s expansion. The problem is that, at the very time Ms. Notley’s government should be focused on policies that direct its economy to safe harbour in the market chaos that is climate change, her contrived narrative on the importance of tidewater access is leading the Alberta economy into the perfect storm.

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Canada Buys Pipeline as Oil Bubble Is About to Burst

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau just dropped $4.5 billion of taxpayers’ money on a 67-year-old pipeline, with at least another $7 billion needed to finish what the private sector backed away from.

Is this shrewd investment?

Not according to researchers who just published a paper in the prestigious journal Nature Climate Change. The study “Macroeconomic impact of stranded fossil fuel assets” predicts that up to $4 trillion in global oil investments will evaporate as the world transitions to a low carbon future.

The lead researcher of the study, professor Jean-Francois Mercure of Radboud University in the Netherlands, was blunt when reached for comment by Global News.

“This is going to have massive economic consequences… the results in the study for Canada are pretty dramatic.” He added that he believed the long-term prospects for the newly purchased pipeline were “doomed” based on their projections.

Their research indicates rapidly stranded oil assets could destabilize the global economy before 2035. “Our conclusions support the existence of a carbon bubble that, if not deflated early, could lead to a discounted global wealth loss of US $1 to $4 trillion, a loss comparable to the 2008 financial crisis.”

Not only has Trudeau reneged on his pledge in the 2015 election campaign to eliminate fossil fuel subsides, which remain at $3.3 billion, he has now thrown an additional $11 billion of taxpayers money on the table. Regardless of your opinion on climate change (i.e. the laws of physics), this massive public investment in the fossil fuel sector at the end of the age of oil is mind-bogglingly ill advised....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..more from the above piece

quote:

According to the researchers, two gathering global forces are eroding the foundation of the once-unassailable fossil industry.

Emerging disruptive technologies are already reducing global oil demand. China is replacing the equivalent of the entire London diesel bus fleet every five weeks with electric battery buses in an effort to improve wretched air quality in Chinese cities. This single example has already removed 233,000 barrels of fuel per day from global energy demand, propelled by plunging battery prices that are declining by 20 per cent per year.

The other death knell for Alberta’s expensive oil is carbon-limiting public policy from more principled governments elsewhere in the world. Technology alone will disrupt the oil economy, but public interventions are also speeding this transformation. Looking at almost 100 countries worldwide, the authors found that over three-quarters of global emissions are targeted by various climate plans.

Three years ago Vancouver adopted a little-noticed policy to derive all of the city’s energy needs from renewable sources by 2050. While that seems a long way off, this commitment is already affecting infrastructure, procurement and planning decisions decades into the future. All around the world, similar efforts are beginning to gain traction.

As these forces move global energy markets to a tipping point, oil-producing nations may rush to get their reserves to market before it is worthless — a scenario the researchers termed the “sell out.”

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..from the coast protector page.

June 7 at 6:19pm

I pleaded guilty of breaking the Kinder Morgan court injunction today in The Supreme Court of BC. I had a choice of 75 hours community service or $1500 fine and opted for the fine. The lawyer tried to knock it down to $1000 but alas, no. Below is my statement to the court. #protecttheinlet.

*
Why I engaged in civil disobedience at Kinder Morgan

I engaged in peaceful civil disobedience at the gates of the Kinder Morgan oil facility because I believe that confronting the harm of fossil fuels is the most important question of our generation. I often wake in fear about what is happening to our planet, and I want to be able to tell my children and grandchildren (if I’m blessed to have them ) that I did everything I could to protect them from the ravaging effects of climate change.

I grew up near Horseshoe Bay, where I swam in the salt water bays of the Salish Sea all summer long. This childhood was a gift. I grew up inside this coast – its rain, salmon, whales, barnacles, starfish --and its dark and mysterious forests. My parents taught me to feel a sense of reverence entering an old growth forest, or motoring at dusk across Howe Sound in my father’s wooden boat. Day by day they were teaching me to appreciate the beauty that surrounded me.

As a child I didn’t know I was swimming in waters that had belonged for 30,000 years to the Coast Salish people. But I know this now, and this deepens my sense of reverence, and my obligation to listen to their voices. I feel I have a sacred duty to protect what gives me joy, and which fosters my soul so deeply, and which is, ultimately, a land I have lived on only recently, compared to the Tsleil Waututh, Musqueam and Squamish.

As a writer, my inspiration comes from the well-spring that is our coast, and I cannot turn from it when it is endangered.

I have a deep respect for the law and for Canada’s legal system, and I am a law-abiding citizen and I fully accept the consequences of my actions and the sentencing. However, in this matter I have felt –as have so many others with whom I’m proud to stand today -- that I must answer to a higher moral law. It comes from the tides and the rain, from deep within this place I call home. It comes from within my heart. And it tells me to act for future generations, for the animals and wild things I love. To act for life itself.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Orca pod cruises through Victoria's Inner Harbour during hour-long visit

A pod of killer whales made a rare appearance in Victoria’s Inner Harbour Thursday, frolicking not far from the British Columbia legislature.

The group of four or five orcas, including a large male and what appeared to be a calf, brought vessel traffic to a near standstill and delayed floatplane activity during the roughly hour-long visit.

Jackie Cowan lives aboard a boat in the harbour and says she was listening to marine radio chatter about a pod of killer whales in Juan de Fuca Strait and then suddenly heard the Transport Canada patrol vessel ordering the harbour cleared.

“I realized, oh my gosh, they are coming down the (seaplane) takeoff and runway lanes, which is straight down into the Inner Harbour,” she said.

Cowan, a member of Victoria’s Royal Canadian Marine Search and Rescue Station 35 and a captain for a local whale-watching company, identified the pod as T49A, a family group of transient orcas which mainly eat seals and sealions....

 

Pondering

epaulo13 wrote:

..more from the above piece

quote:

According to the researchers, two gathering global forces are eroding the foundation of the once-unassailable fossil industry.

Emerging disruptive technologies are already reducing global oil demand. China is replacing the equivalent of the entire London diesel bus fleet every five weeks with electric battery buses in an effort to improve wretched air quality in Chinese cities. This single example has already removed 233,000 barrels of fuel per day from global energy demand, propelled by plunging battery prices that are declining by 20 per cent per year.

The other death knell for Alberta’s expensive oil is carbon-limiting public policy from more principled governments elsewhere in the world. Technology alone will disrupt the oil economy, but public interventions are also speeding this transformation. Looking at almost 100 countries worldwide, the authors found that over three-quarters of global emissions are targeted by various climate plans.

Three years ago Vancouver adopted a little-noticed policy to derive all of the city’s energy needs from renewable sources by 2050. While that seems a long way off, this commitment is already affecting infrastructure, procurement and planning decisions decades into the future. All around the world, similar efforts are beginning to gain traction.

As these forces move global energy markets to a tipping point, oil-producing nations may rush to get their reserves to market before it is worthless — a scenario the researchers termed the “sell out.”

It's insane that Montreal buses aren't all electric by now but it will happen eventually.

NDPP

Canada's New Democratic Party and the Global Warming Emergency

http://rogerannis.com/canadas-new-democratic-party-and-the-global-warmin...

"...The shallowness of Singh's opposition is shown by his treatment of the relentless support for the pipeline by his fellow NDP leader and Premier of Alberta, Rachel Notley. He says Notley is 'doing the right thing as leader of the Alberta NDP because she is 'protecting the interests of Alberta.'

We are to understand from this that the 'interests of Alberta' coincide with those of the fossil fuel industry. But socially and environmentally aware residents of Alberta would beg to disagree. The fossil fuel industry and its related industries - auto, aerospace, armaments, mass tourism - are a death cult that has dragged the world into a global warming emergency..."

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Protesters greet PM at meeting with Trans Mountain pipeline's Indigenous-led oversight committee

Prime Minister Justin Trudeau was greeted by dozens of protesters as he arrived at the Cheam Multiplex in the B.C. Fraser Valley for a meeting about the Trans Mountain pipeline.

He arrived in the Stó:lō community of Cheam early Tuesday to meet with members of the Indigenous Advisory and Monitoring Committee.

The Indigenous-led committee was struck following the approval of the Trans Mountain expansion project.

It was designed to be a collaborative group, comprising 13 Indigenous representatives and six federal representatives.

"This committee has been set up so that all the different communities along this Trans Mountain expansion pipeline route … are able to weigh in and participate in decisions that are made that will affect them as we move forward with this project," said Trudeau in his opening remarks before the media were asked to leave.

He sat next to Cheam First Nation Chief Ernie Crey, who is the co-chair of the pipeline committee.

quote:

'It really hurts,' says pipeline opponent

Band members from Cheam were among the dozens of people who stood outside the multiplex for hours while the meeting took place, voicing their opposition to the expansion project.

Trevor Victor, also known as Maytomexw, said he was awakened by the sound of the drums as the protest began.

The 23-year-old kitchen manager said he is one of many people in Cheam who are against the expansion. Victor said his concerns are primarily about the disruption of the land that he's grown up on and gathered foods from, and of the waters that he fishes.

Victor said he wasn't impressed that the prime minister was in his community. He said he voted for Trudeau in the last federal election largely because of his campaign promises about an improved relationship with First Nations people.

"It really hurts to see someone have such a fake platform and not fulfilling their terms," he said.

"He truly disappointed me as a voting member of Canada."

Victor said he's also disappointed in his community's chief, for whom he also voted.

"Chief Ernie Crey likes to say that Cheam is all for the Kinder Morgan pipeline expansion project, but half of the membership said no and half of the membership was very upset when they learned that Cheam had signed on with Kinder Morgan," said Victor, referring to the community's mutual benefit agreement with the company.

quote:

Denise Douglas, another Cheam band member, led the group of protesters as they arrived at the multiplex. She spoke to the media through a window, as journalists sat inside a boardroom after clearing security for the prime minister's arrival.

"Kinder Morgan signed a deal with our band council after we overwhelmingly said no, and then they came in and swooned our band council and got a yes vote," she said.

"We have not given consent."

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

When all the trees have been cut down, when all the animals have been hunted, when all the water has been polluted, when all the air is unsafe to breathe, only then you will discover you cannot drink OIL.

Autumn Peltier w/ Ireva Photography — at Wiikwemkoong Unceded Territory.

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Kinder Morgan Bait & Switch: Backdoor pipeline to Washington State refineries could save Trans Mountain Expansion

quote:

But instead of urging that the Trudeau government stop this controversial purchase, Gunton stated this: “Ironically, their purchase of the pipeline may provide them with one last chance for changing course. If they insist on building TMX they could appoint a multi-stakeholder task force including First Nations to consider redesigning the project to reduce its worst impacts by scaling down the size of the expansion and directing increased shipments to refineries in Washington State. This would avoid tanker exports from Vancouver, reduce the number of Alaskan tankers through Georgia Straight, and allow for the phasing out of the higher risk aging pipeline.”

This suggested “redesign” to benefit Washington’s major refineries may have been the plan all along, or at least since November 15, 2016 when Gunton’s former boss – B.C.’s former premier Mike Harcourt – suggested that Kinder Morgan and the federal Liberals “consider an alternate route” to avoid Kinder Morgan’s Westridge Terminal in Burnaby. Even before Trudeau had given federal approval to Kinder Morgan’s expansion project, Harcourt was here urging that the tarsands diluted bitumen (dilbit) be shipped “to either Deltaport or just across the B.C.-Washington state border to the Cherry Point refinery” in order to avoid “insurrection” in B.C.

The Trans Mountain pipeline has a southern leg – called Puget Sound Pipeline – which splits off at Kinder Morgan’s Sumas Terminal in Abbotsford, B.C. and delivers tar sands dilbit to several refineries in Washington State, including the Ferndale Refinery (owned by Phillips 66), the Cherry Point Refinery (owned by BP), the Andeavor Anacortes Refinery (now owned by Marathon Petroleum), and the Shell Anacortes Refinery (owned by Shell Oil).

The Puget Sound Pipeline currently has a capacity of 170,000 barrels per day (bpd), but in the documents filed for its IPO in May 2017, Kinder Morgan indicated that they want to significantly increase that amount, according to Sven Biggs of Stand.earth’s Bellingham, Washington office.

That finding seems to have been part of the reason that the local council of Whatcom County (located in the northwest corner of Washington State), voted 6-1 in June 2017 to effectively put a moratorium on the export of unrefined oil and coal from their area. But refined oil products are allowed in order to protect the hundreds of highly-paid refinery jobs in the state.

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B.C. Chiefs Say They Don't Support Trans Mountain Pipeline Despite Signing Agreements

Two First Nations chiefs who signed letters of support for the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion say they don't truly support the project.

Chief Robert Joseph of Ditidaht First Nation told the Tracking Trans Mountain team that he felt fighting the pipeline was futile.

"At the end of the day, we are not really in favour of any pipeline, but we believe it's going to go through anyway," Joseph said. "They will not listen to anybody and that's the history of consultation with First Nations people ... They consult and go ahead and do what they were going to do anyways."

quote:

Consultation process not meaningful: chief

Ditidaht is a nation of 774 members with 17 reserves. Its main community is located on the west coast of Vancouver Island. About six kilometres of the shipping route for Trans Mountain tankers falls within traditional territory claimed by Ditidaht in submissions for the B.C. Treaty process.

Ditidaht has expressed many concerns about the project, according to a document prepared by the Environmental Assessment Office, including:

  • Planning for an oil spill has been inadequate, especially in regards to extreme weather and possible collisions between Ditidaht fishing boats and Trans Mountain tankers

  • Increases in marine traffic and pollution could cause a decline in fish populations

  • Ditidaht will assume a disproportionate amount of risk in the event of an oil spill or tanker accident

  • The National Energy Board downplayed the project's effects on Ditidaht in its assessment of the project.

Joseph said he worried that if his nation opposed the project, they would be on their own if oil spills.

He said the consultation process wasn't meaningful.

"Even if it's the best consultation on the face of the earth, if they do what they were going to do anyhow, what's the point?"

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Nathan Cullen accuses Canada of buying 'lemon' from Kinder Morgan after estimated size of oil spill multiplies by 48 times

quote:

NEB rejected Kinder Morgan request for financial relief

Prior to the incident, Kinder Morgan had asked the federal regulator, the National Energy Board whether it could ease requirements to set aside adequate financial resources. The NEB denied this request in a letter dated April 12, 2018.

Meantime, regarding the apparent change in the estimated volume of the spill, Trans Mountain told CP that it hadn't provided an estimate to regulators when it reported the incident.

"Trans Mountain had not provided an estimate of the volume spilled, other than to confirm with regulators that it was over the reportable threshold, until cleanup had sufficiently progressed to a stage where an accurate estimation could be provided," Trans Mountain spokeswoman Ali Hounsell told CP in an email.

But the company provided the updated estimate following an onsite investigation, and is now completing the cleanup, Hounsell told CP.

B.C.'s spill reporting rules require companies to report spills of this nature immediately and that the quantity of any amount spilled should be included "to the extent practical."

The company turned off the pipeline for several hours the day of the spill, which the ministry said came from a leaking flow metre.

The spill was contained to the station property and no waterways were affected, the ministry said.

Two days later, Prime Minister Justin Trudeau announced the government's plans to buy the expansion project and other Kinder Morgan assets in Canada.

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Protesters risk arrest at Kinder Morgan Burnaby terminal for the first time since the Crown said it would seek 7 days jail time as the new penalty

video

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Leaked letter reveals Kinder Morgan broke rules for months before Canadian officials noticed company put marine life in danger

quote:

Letter identifies four violations

The letter contrasts with recent assurances by the federal government that its officials have kept a close eye on the company and taken adequate measures through a "world-leading" plan to ensure that the Trans Mountain west coast pipeline and tanker expansion project will proceed without damaging the environment or public safety.

The Trudeau government approved the expansion project in November 2016, prompting fierce opposition from several affected First Nations and communities along its proposed route. But at the time, the government said that it was also imposing 157 conditions on Kinder Morgan, as recommended by the federal energy regulator, the National Energy Board (NEB), to ensure that the project would be safe. These conditions included requiring the company to obtain more than 1,000 federal, provincial and municipal permits required for different stages of the construction.

The fisheries department gave Trans Mountain permission to begin some expansion work on its Westridge Marine Terminal on Sept. 8, 2017, provided that it meet a number of safety and environmental conditions. Non compliance would contravene a major Canadian environmental law, the federal Fisheries Act, that is used to protect bodies of water inhabited by marine species.

The warning letter identifies four different violations related to pile driving during expansion work on the Burrard Inlet in the metro Vancouver region near the Kinder Morgan terminal between January and May 2018. The company exceeded safe underwater noise limits for such marine species as the harbour porpoise and the Steller sea lion as it proceeded with the pile driving activity, according to a separate email sent by the federal department to members of an Indigenous Advisory and Monitoring Committee that was set up to keep tabs on the project.

The letter also noted that the company failed to file required construction monitoring reports to the federal department and members of the special committee, including First Nations representatives, for three consecutive months, from January to March. The department said in the letter, sent to Trans Mountain vice president David Safari, that it only noticed that Trans Mountain wasn't filing its mandatory reports after email correspondence with the company on April 26, 2018.

quote:

Last fall, the federal pipeline regulator, the National Energy Board, ordered the company to stop using anti-spawning mats in streams inhabited by fish, after it had started to do this work without authorization.

“It’s part of a pattern that we’ve observed and sadly not all that surprising about Kinder Morgan not being able to even meet the minimal requirements that were the result of the NEB process and here’s another example of them violating the conditions and essentially having very little consequences, which is what DFO is saying,” Kung said in a phone interview.

DFO and didn’t immediately respond to questions about the warning letter. Trans Mountain told National Observer in a statement that it is “committed to compliance with its environmental and regulatory obligations,” and “aggressively implementing measures to avoid future non-compliance.”

The company also said it was engaging with DFO “directly, transparently and collaboratively through ongoing site inspections, information request exchanges and required reporting.”

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Pipeline incidents in Canada spiked by almost half last year, report finds

Pipeline incidents like oil spills are on the rise across Canada, and an aging Montreal-Ontario line that has been plagued with safety problems and leaks is a major reason why, says a new report released Thursday.

In 2017, there were 41 per cent more pipeline incidents nationwide than in 2016 — 173 compared to 122 — according to Montreal-based Équiterre, which examined Canadian government incident and spill data since 2004.

The group also found that there were more pipeline incidents in 2017 than in any year over the last decade, and incidents on Quebec’s pipelines last year accounted for over half since 2008. Most of those, 86 per cent, were on oil pipelines, as opposed to gas.

Équiterre accused the National Energy Board (NEB) of failing to protect Canadians and the environment from pipeline incidents. But Canada’s energy regulator says the spike last year can partially be explained by delayed reporting of incidents from previous years due mainly to a "misunderstanding" by one company of reporting requirements.

The report’s findings led to a charged exchange Thursday in the House of Commons between government and opposition NDP MPs.

“Pipeline management in this country is a joke,” said Alexandre Boulerice, NDP environment and climate change critic. “When will this government clean up its act and deal with these disrespectful oil companies?”...

quizzical

so how come no one's talking about David Dodge's statement in Edmonton today about protesters going to die?

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..can't be everywhere at once quiz. :) didn't hear about it. why didn't you post a link?

quizzical
quizzical

oh figured it out

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..txs. what a creep dodge is.

quote:

While he wouldn’t speculate in an interview how fatalities might occur during the Trans Mountain expansion, he said he’s worried about what will happen among the extremist minority among the pipeline foes.

“We have seen it other places, that equivalent of religious zeal leading to flouting of the law in a way that could lead to death … Inevitably, when you get that fanaticism, if you will, you’re going to have trouble,” he said.

“Are we collectively as a society willing to allow the fanatics to obstruct the general will of the population? That then turns out to be a real test of whether we actually do believe in the rule of law.”

quizzical

goes well beyond creep. sociopath imv.

labeling people as fanatics to be offed to accomodate corporate greed is beyond creepy.

Unionist

quizzical wrote:

goes well beyond creep. sociopath imv.

labeling people as fanatics to be offed to accomodate corporate greed is beyond creepy.

Agreed. What kind of scum-sucking shit is this Dodge? Enforce the fucking laws even if it means protesters dying? He should be locked up and the key thrown away. And because I oppose capital punishment, I heartily wish him a speedy natural death.

NDPP

Dodge is a former Governor of the Bank of Canada who with the rest of the Canadian ruling class and their collaborators have come to expect to have their way in such matters. They may get a surprise when they try to cross Shuswap territory. It might not only be kumbaya and raging grannies in funny hats.

David A Dodge OC

https://www.bennettjones.com/DodgeDavid

quizzical

Unionist wrote:

quizzical wrote:

goes well beyond creep. sociopath imv.

labeling people as fanatics to be offed to accomodate corporate greed is beyond creepy.

Agreed. What kind of scum-sucking shit is this Dodge? Enforce the fucking laws even if it means protesters dying? He should be locked up and the key thrown away. And because I oppose capital punishment, I heartily wish him a speedy natural death.

i think his comments are borderline promotion of hate speech, if not over the line.

Martin N.

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Martin N. wrote:

 

Whadayamean TM isn't a"viable economic choice"? The rest of the Kinder Morgan Canada shareholders and I just made a killing on it.

I guess this is why I have so little time for your views. You think shareholder value is a measure of economic value. This pipeline is indeed a windfall for the Texas scam artists ands their ride along carpet baggers like you. For the rest of Canada it always was and still is a very bad economic decision.

You don't have time for my views because I'm honest and not a morally superior hypocrite. Every pension fund owns entities that do not meet your moral standards but you and all the rest of the anti- pipeline pot bangers will take the money without a squeak. Hypocrite.

 

I have no concerns with your goals, only your unprincipled methods so feel free to look down on me from the heights of empty moral outrage.

 

mmphosis
Martin N.

quizzical wrote:

Unionist wrote:

quizzical wrote:

goes well beyond creep. sociopath imv.

labeling people as fanatics to be offed to accomodate corporate greed is beyond creepy.

Agreed. What kind of scum-sucking shit is this Dodge? Enforce the fucking laws even if it means protesters dying? He should be locked up and the key thrown away. And because I oppose capital punishment, I heartily wish him a speedy natural death.

i think his comments are borderline promotion of hate speech, if not over the line.

Dodge isn't speaking of "protesters", he is speaking about the core fanatics that may advocate violence as a means to their goals. If lawbreakers escalate conflict to the point that public safety is threatened, including the safety of legitimate protesters, then the authorities must respond with measures appropriate to the threat. Hysterical passive/aggressive death threats over an opinion are symptomatic of lunacy, not logic.

Escalation is quoted as a legitimate option to pressure government. The rationale is that politicians will cave if too many protesters are arrested. It's a powerful option and legal. Escalating violence to provoke a violent response, hopefully an over response for the cameras is not.

quizzical

Martin N. wrote:

quizzical wrote:

Unionist wrote:

quizzical wrote:

goes well beyond creep. sociopath imv.

labeling people as fanatics to be offed to accomodate corporate greed is beyond creepy.

Agreed. What kind of scum-sucking shit is this Dodge? Enforce the fucking laws even if it means protesters dying? He should be locked up and the key thrown away. And because I oppose capital punishment, I heartily wish him a speedy natural death.

i think his comments are borderline promotion of hate speech, if not over the line.

Dodge isn't speaking of "protesters", he is speaking about the core fanatics that may advocate violence as a means to their goals. If lawbreakers escalate conflict to the point that public safety is threatened, including the safety of legitimate protesters, then the authorities must respond with measures appropriate to the threat. Hysterical passive/aggressive death threats over an opinion are symptomatic of lunacy, not logic.

Escalation is quoted as a legitimate option to pressure government. The rationale is that politicians will cave if too many protesters are arrested. It's a powerful option and legal. Escalating violence to provoke a violent response, hopefully an over response for the cameras is not.

you sir are mentally and emotionally bankrupt.

thankfully most Canadians do not have the same empty belief patterns as you.

Pondering

Martin N. wrote:
 Dodge isn't speaking of "protesters", he is speaking about the core fanatics that may advocate violence as a means to their goals. If lawbreakers escalate conflict to the point that public safety is threatened, including the safety of legitimate protesters, then the authorities must respond with measures appropriate to the threat. Hysterical passive/aggressive death threats over an opinion are symptomatic of lunacy, not logic.

That isn't what he said. This is what he said:

“We’re going to have some very unpleasant circumstances. There are some people that are going to die in protesting construction of this pipeline. We have to understand that,” he said at an event Wednesday in Edmonton put on by law firm Bennett Jones.

“Nevertheless, we have to be willing to enforce the law once it’s there … It’s going to take some fortitude to stand up.”

He is saying even if people die we still must be willing to enforce the law and that it will take fortitude to stand up. 

There is  no reason why people would die for protesting this pipeline. People have protests all the time and nobody dies. Even black bloc protesters don't endanger other protesters. He is saying some people will die and that we have to understand that. 

I don't accept that. I don't accept a single death as "understandable".  If protesters throw themselves in front of equipment or there is any danger of it then the equipment should not move. 

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