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Police State

Khalsa
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Joined: Nov 30 2008

I realize I have come late to this, but after the forced shut-down of Occupy Wall Street and Occupy Oakland, I was somewhat relieved to see that Norm Stamper - the former head of the Seattle Police Department - has spoken out against the heavy-handed tactics of some police forces in dealing with the Occupy Movement.  

Stamper even admitted that during the infamous "Battle of Seattle" in 1999, the use of chemical agents was a mistake, and that his actions had interfered with the legitimate democratic rights of protesters.

Check out his book: Breaking Rank: A Top Cop's Expose of the Dark Side of American Policing.

In a November 17, 2011 Democracy Now interview, the former police chief states: "There are many compassionate, decent, competent police officers who do a terrific job day in and day out.  There are other who are "bad apples."  What they both have in common is that they "occupy" as it were, a system, a structure that itself is rotten.  And I am talking about the paramilitary bureaucracy."

See the whole interview with Amy Goodman and others here. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 


Comments

milo204
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Joined: Feb 3 2010

i don't look at cops as being any worse than those who do any number of jobs that fuck the rest of us.  The probem is the system and the people who decide what the "rules" are going to be and who they get enforced against.  

At the same time, any job that gives people such violent authority over others is bound to attract people who will abuse it, or who just like the idea of having authority over others.  people like us generally don't become police because to me the whole idea of being a police officer under this set of rules seems wrong.


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

Cops are small taters. I think it's time we proles threw out the long-time corrupt stoogeaucracy in Ottawa. That should be worth a lot more points on the video game than merely cleaning out a few bad cops. Proles gotta think bigger.


Khalsa
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Joined: Nov 30 2008

Effecting a consciousness shift in Ottawa is going to require consciousness-raising and education on a grand scale designed to even make the stooges ashamed and embarrassed at their actions.  That is why I laud Norm Stamper's book, the Democracy Now interview, and even this site, this discussion, as steps in the right direction.  We just need more of them.


Slumberjack
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Joined: Aug 8 2005

The biometric data of everyone in Canada travelling outside the country will soon be available to every national security institution of the US.  The plan constitutes an exit visa of sorts for the purpose of tracking everyone's movement, using material extracted from our own bodies.


Khalsa
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Joined: Nov 30 2008

Under ideal circumstances, this should not bother us in the least, but so long as paranoia and sheer meanness are the operative terms of our continental security apparatus, this can be worrisome indeed.


quizzical
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Joined: Dec 8 2011

Slumberjack wrote:
The biometric data of everyone in Canada travelling outside the country will soon be available to every national security institution of the US.  The plan constitutes an exit visa of sorts for the purpose of tracking everyone's movement, using material extracted from our own bodies.

Slumberjack, very interesting moniker btw, what do you mean by this? By that  I mean, details like how are they going to get our BMD, and where is any info on this?


epaulo13
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Joined: Dec 13 2009

Among the highlights of the new "Beyond the Border" plan:

- There will be enhanced tracking of travellers in both countries, and both nations will try to identify threatening people who seek to "enter the perimeter" of both countries so they can be stopped.

- An entry-exit system will be established in which both countries share information on when their citizens have crossed the border.

- Each country will obtain more information, including biometric data, from people in foreign nations seeking to come to the U.S. and Canada.

- Each country will share more information about criminals in their countries who might be seeking to cross the border.

- Police forces and security departments will work more closely to identify "radicalized" people who might become violent.

- Security officials, including armed police officers, will work as teams on either side of the border - with Canadian and American policemen venturing together into the territory of each nation.

- There will be joint screening of cargo coming from foreign countries to Canada and the U.S., so that it is screened just once for both nations.

- Some companies in either Canada or the U.S. that ship goods across the border will be given "trusted" status so that the shipment is pre-screened at the factory instead of the border.

- There will be more opportunities for Canadian travellers to obtain NEXUS cards to get faster clearance at border crossings, and governments will commit more funds to open up more lanes for quick clearance at air and land crossings.

http://www.montrealgazette.com/news/canada/Border+deal+seeks+security+trade/5828887/story.html

Aristotleded24
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Joined: May 24 2005

epaulo13 wrote:

Among the highlights of the new "Beyond the Border" plan:

- Security officials, including armed police officers, will work as teams on either side of the border - with Canadian and American policemen venturing together into the territory of each nation.

No. American security officials will venture into Canadian territory, and Canadian security officials will stay in Canada. On paper our security forces can move across borders, but in practice the US will never accept foreign agents on their own soil.


Slumberjack
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Joined: Aug 8 2005

quizzical wrote:
By that  I mean, details like how are they going to get our BMD, and where is any info on this?

Travellers will voluntarily provide their biometric data of course, just as they submit to body scans, strip searches, and genital fondling at airports.


Unionist
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Joined: Dec 11 2005

Oooooooo... Kinky... I should fly more often...

 


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

Aristotleded24 wrote:

epaulo13 wrote:

Among the highlights of the new "Beyond the Border" plan:

- Security officials, including armed police officers, will work as teams on either side of the border - with Canadian and American policemen venturing together into the territory of each nation.

No. American security officials will venture into Canadian territory, and Canadian security officials will stay in Canada. On paper our security forces can move across borders, but in practice the US will never accept foreign agents on their own soil.

And Steve will still be allowed to keep his tn visa for when making his way to Warshington to beg corporate America to rob us blind of raw materials and energy, accept marching orders for our military, and to take dictation personally with regard to Ottawa's colonial administrative tasks and duties in general. 


Boom Boom
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Joined: Dec 29 2004

Unionist wrote:

Oooooooo... Kinky... I should fly more often...

 

LaughingLaughingLaughingLaughing


Unionist
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Joined: Dec 11 2005

Meh, it's no big deal. The only reason for individuals to cross the border is to drive to Mexico - cheaper and faster to fly. The only reason for businesses to cross is to buy dear and sell cheap. We should import Israel's apartheid wall, thereby terminating two fowl with one boulder.

 


Slumberjack
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Joined: Aug 8 2005

Unionist wrote:
Oooooooo... Kinky... I should fly more often...

Pay no mind to the motto of the border security services then...'god helps those who help themselves.'


CDN_FORCES
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Joined: Nov 24 2011

If you go through US Customs pre-clearance at a Canadian airport remember that you're still in Canada; they can't detain you or search you. They might call the RCMP but you won't end up in a US prison cell. If you pass that point then keep in mind that the security clearance will be done by Canadians, not DHS/TSA goons. The TSA BS won't happen. 

The problems will start when you try to return; you'll be completely under DHS/TSA control, and any thoughts you might harbour about "due process" will be quickly erased.

Good luck!

(Remember, staying in Canada is your safest vacation choice.)


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004

And the stoogeaucracy will be tasked with informing Uncle Sam of whenever you leave Canada to visit countries in Europe, Asia, Latin America, Cuba, etc. The Harpers don't mind dealing away Canadians' right to privacy and sovereignt in general. But, hey, it's not like we had a real country anyway.

Aye-aye, Uncle Sam, whatever you say goes on the double-double! The Yanks must be laughing their heads off. Again!


Slumberjack
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Joined: Aug 8 2005

This certainly has to be seen as an unintended consequence of the rise of the surveillance state.  It's doubtful this era of heightened watch over the population was ever meant to reveal the everyday brutality of the police and their accompanying lies and cover-ups.


Maysie
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Joined: Apr 21 2005

Great article, Slumberjack. Of course not everyone has the advantage of being an endocrinologist and having a video recording of the police assault. I hope he sues their asses off.

And in less cheery news, aka, the "Duh, Of Course" department:

Minorities more likely to be frisked by police: New York City. OMG stop the presses.

UK Terrorism Act: Over 100,000 stops and searches result in no arrests for "terrorism". Lovely. But we knew that already.

The UN's rather useless tome on the topic (pdf). It's good for a laugh. Counter Terrorism Implementation Task Force (CTITF): Working Group on Protecting Human Rights while Countering Terrorism

Quote:
Everyone has the right to liberty and security of person.3 States shall respect and ensure the full enjoyment of this right by all persons within their jurisdiction. Any limitation must be provided by law, be non-discriminatory, necessary and proportional.

Ha ha ha! Those UN task force peeps are hilarious!

 


Boom Boom
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Joined: Dec 29 2004

I didn't keep the link, but this morning I read a post on Facebook that said the Occupy protestors are suing the cities that evicted them (in the USA) claiming their rights to free speech (and other rights) had been violated.


Fidel
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Joined: Apr 29 2004
NDPP
Online
Joined: Dec 28 2008

Saboteur

http://dissidentvoice.org/2011/12/saboteur/#more-40690

"An interview with a domestic insurgent.."


Aristotleded24
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Joined: May 24 2005

milo204 wrote:
people like us generally don't become police because to me the whole idea of being a police officer under this set of rules seems wrong.

Not necessarily. Many officers honestly believe they are doing us a favour by stopping the "bad guys," and I once watched a police dog demonstration where the officer putting on the demonstration said that using the police dog to find one missing senior citizen feels better for him than finding several bad guys.


NDPP
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Joined: Dec 28 2008

but 'Befehl ist Befehl'...

Remember G20 Toronto


Slumberjack
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Joined: Aug 8 2005

Remember Mandy Hiscocks, and remember the enemy's [Toronto Sun] write up of her jailing.


M. Spector
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Joined: Feb 19 2005

From Hiscocks's excellent statement in court:

Quote:

The crown wants this sentence to be a deterrent. It won't be. Please take a second to have a good look around the room. When I get taken out of here do you think you'll have increased anyone's faith in the system?

I am certainly not deterred, I'm just angry.

No matter what my sentence is today, it won't be about justice. Your system is not about justice. If it was, don't you think we would have come to you when the G20 decided to set foot here to pursue their obviously unjust austerity agenda? Don't you think we would have asked for your help when the police started to put up their fences and cages, and randomly arrest whoever they felt like so they could systematically abuse them in the detention centre?

If this system was about righting wrongs, don't you think we would come to you to hold the rich to account for their abuses against the poor, immigration officials to account for their abuses against people without status, and settlers to account for our abuses against Indigenous people?

We didn't and don't come to you. We won't ever come to you.

A court of real justice would defend people against aggressors. In this society, the privileged are the aggressors, but time after time you choose to protect their privilege and their property against people who are struggling to survive. You're doing it wrong. Let's not debate. The obvious answer to the violence and the chaos is the cops brought that. I'm going to try and finish.

This legal system that we have here is not equal, it's not fair and its not just. And a lot of people out there believe that it is. What I would like to impart to you is that I don't buy it and the statistics don't support it.

You speak of dignity, that everyone should be treated with dignity. I agree with you. But you can't treat someone with dignity, or expect to be treated with dignity in return, while one person is up high and the other person is down low, while your boot is on their neck.

This is why we, myself and the people in the other room, don't have decorum in this system.

Throughout this farcical legal process that's coming to an end today the accused have been told that our actions were an attack on the rule of law, which is at the heart of our society. Well, good. Our society is racist and colonial, its rooted in wealth and power, and so is the rule of law that upholds it.

And I'm going to leave this court room today, to quote Chilean anarchist Diego Rios:

"I am carrying all my hatred and contempt for power, its laws, its authority, its society, and I have no room for guilt or fear of punishment."


NDPP
Online
Joined: Dec 28 2008

Andrew Gavin Marshall on the High-Tech Police State (and audio)

http://www.corbettreport.com/interview-451-andrew-gavin-marshall-on-the-...

"Discusses the police state, the technologies that undergird it, and how the police state spreads across borders to become an international phenomenon. We talk about methods and techniques of control, and how they serve the interests of the social engineers.."


Caissa
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Joined: Jun 14 2006

Ontario's top police complaints watchdog has concluded five officers involved in the now infamous arrest of G20 protester Adam Nobody should be charged with misconduct for using unnecessary force and for discreditable conduct, CBC News has learned.

CBC News has obtained a report produced by the Office of the Independent Police Review Director (OIPRD) on Nobody's violent takedown on the lawn of Queen's Park in Toronto on June 26, 2010.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/story/2012/01/19/toronto-g20-adam-...

Tommy_Paine
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Joined: Apr 22 2001

 

Came across this, this morning:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ME_uUd2I4uo&feature=share

http://charlesotherpersonality.blogspot.com/

http://oldmaison.blogspot.com/

First I've heard of Charles Leblanc.  Not sure what the 'defamation' was, but it seems from looking he's just a pain in the butt-- the kind that should be welcomed, and at worst, tollerated in a democracy.  Maybe some east coast babblers know more about him.

 

Anyway, it puts me in mind of something that's been a theme with me for a couple of years.  When we talk about the 'police state' we most often focus our ire and attention and our protests against the front line cops.  And that's not wrong when they are wrong.

But as long as our focus stops there, nothing will be done.  We really need to go after Crown Attourney's who selectively prosecute.  We need to tackle "plea bargains" which are nothing more than a device to keep poor people going to jail, and rich people out of jail.

And we need to start focusing on J.P.'s and Judges who rubber stamp police requests for search warrants.


These people are fascilitators, and they are the ones who give the crooked cops the cue on when, and against who, they are allowed to be crooked.


Slumberjack
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Joined: Aug 8 2005

It's the whole rotting corpse that we refer to as the state; that people keep trying to resuscitate using a variety of methods including mouth to mouth electioneering, which begs for our indifference and a proper burial.


Caissa
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Joined: Jun 14 2006

Charles is well-known in NB as a burr in the side of authority. As you can tell from the comments section on this CBC news story, opinions about him are divided.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/story/2012/01/20/nb-blogger-...


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