2018 Flood Season

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NorthReport
2018 Flood Season

BC is having serious floods this Spring. This is serious shit and my heart goes out to those folks experiencing flooding here in BC as well as across Canada. 

Several homes evacuated following Kelowna landslide as flooding hits southern B.C.

Emergency operations centre also established for residents near Kamloops in Thompson-Nicola regional district

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/thompson-nicola-floods-1....

NorthReport

Tragic.

Cache Creek fire chief reported missing near flood waters

Search and rescue, fire crews resume search Saturday

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/cache-chreek-fire-chief-c...

NorthReport

Spring temperatures cause flooding, mud slides for southern B.C.

http://www.ctvnews.ca/canada/spring-temperatures-cause-flooding-mud-slid...

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UPDATE: Armstrong declares flood emergency

The City of Armstrong has declared a state of local emergency due to flooding which is occurring throughout the community

https://www.vernonmorningstar.com/news/armstrong-declares-flood-emergenc...

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Back when I lived in Dresden, ON, there was a flood.  The Sydenham river was backed up with floating ice, and the whole town was drowned.  I remember seeing Town officials standing by the banks, looking at the reading on a measuring stick.  And I remember paddling a canoe down the main street of town.

I also remember that when the flood came, there was some kind of "Oil 'n' Lube" business near the river, and when the waters rose it flooded their oil reservoirs, so the whole friggin' town had an oil slick on it.  When the waters went down, everything touched by the flood had "ring around the collar" from that oil.

I also remember that the Town volunteer fire department was prepared to fill the basement of any homeowner who wanted it.  The idea was that if the flood waters poured into your basement, they would be muddy and filthy, but if you filled your basement with clean water before the flood got up to that level, the clean water would keep the dirty water from pouring in, and you'd only have to deal with water, but not mud and silt.  That always struck me as a hell of a tough choice, and a hell of a gamble.

As I recall, the waters got within six or so inches of flooding our house, but we were in the "floodplain" and had no basement, so in the end we were unaffected.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Is this their "Mel Lastman moment"?

Are they helping to shovel rainwater?

NorthReport
quizzical

the snow pack on the Rockies, Selkirks, Cariboo and Monashees has barely even started. i mean barely.  we got fresh snow on them just a couple of days back.

if it gets hot quickly it's not going to be nice down stream.

Rev Pesky

The Fraser River is pretty brown, at the moment. It seems a bit early for this, but perhaps I'm not remembering correctly.

 

quizzical

it's still low and blue here at the headwaters what's in it down steam comes from further down stream lol.

NorthReport

Landslide prompts North Westside evacuation

A small landslide came down in the Killiney Beach subdivision below Westside Road. 400 remain on evacuation order.

http://www.saobserver.net/news/update-landslide-prompts-north-westside-e...

NorthReport

Flooding fears rise as 'unseasonably warm weather' hits south Okanagan

High winds and cooler temperatures expected to follow by Tuesday night

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/flooding-fears-rise-as-un...

NorthReport
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Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

When I lived in Dresden (ON) we had a flood one year.  Our house was on the flood plain, so it had no basement, but we did have a crawlspace under the house (for pipes and suchlike) and there was a service hatch in my bedroom that I could remove to look down and watch the water rise.  It got to within a few inches, but it never made it into the house.

I did, however, get to paddle a canoe down the main street of the town.  That was fun, but disgusting.  The entire town had an oil slick on it, and everywhere the waters rose enough, there were floating volleyballs and pieces of firewood and bits of styrofoam and pretty much anything buoyant that wasn't nailed down.  And of course in the higher parts of town, business as usual.  We got a day off school, though, when the bridge got flooded out!

This "Heritage Minute" brought to you by Mr. Magoo.

NorthReport

It must be horrific and terrifying to be flooded out of your home

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Well, NR, I guess I can't say for sure, since we weren't actually flooded out.  Sure, the entire yard was water but it didn't make it up into the house in our case.

I know I've posted about this before, but it still fascinates me:  when the floodwaters were inching up (despite attempts to dynamite the ice jams downstream) the local fire department was willing to come and flood the basement of anyone in danger, using clean water.  The gamble was simple.

If the waters crept up to where they'd flood your basement anyway, being "pre-flooded" with clean municipal water would mean that very little muddy and ugly floodwater would force its way in.  You'd have water damage, of course, but not silt and oil damage.

But if they filled your basement, and then the river waters receded, you'd have water damage that you might have totally avoided.

It was literally "the evil you know" versus "the evil you don't" and some homeowners probably risked it and won, and some others probably called the FD and won, but others would have done both and lost.

There did seem to be a bit of a quiet resignation that we lived near the Sydenham river, and that river floods every few decades, so whatchagonnado?  Like the Toronto (and really, most of the north-eastern continent) blackout, way back when, people rolled with it.  I recall going down to the bridge, at one point, to see the official dipping of the Official Measuring Stick.  And then everyone just talked among themselves.

NorthReport

I had never heard of that although your explanation for it can make sense

Do fire departments still do that?

And would a lot of homeowners go for it?

NorthReport

And what about compensation insurance wise or government wise?

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:

Do fire departments still do that?

And would a lot of homeowners go for it?

I can't remember for sure, but I must have been either 17 or 18 the year of the flood, so I really don't know how many people chose the evil they knew, and how many took their chances with the evil they didn't.  My best friend at the time lived so far above the flood plain that even though he had an awesome basement, his family didn't even have to be nervous about the rising waters.

Quote:
And what about compensation insurance wise or government wise?

That's a good question... but I have to plead "teenager" on that.  I suppose that insurance agencies would have actuarial tables out the wazoo telling homeowners whether they should choose guaranteed water damage or take their chances with possible water/silt/mud/oil/crap damage.  That's why, 30+ years later, I'm still fascinated.  They had to gamble a certain but lesser punishment against a much greater punishment that may or may not happen.

 

NorthReport

Warm weather in B.C. prompts flooding, evacuation orders

Local authorities have ordered states of emergency in the Okanagan, Similkameen and the Cariboo

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/evacuation-order-central-...

NorthReport

I know Mike Farnworth has been communicating directives about flooding dangers, but BC's Premier needs to get out to the flooded areas, and show some support and empathy for the BCers that have been, and are being flooded out, this Spring. 

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Even parts of Langley, a Vancouver suburb, is now on evacuation alert.

B.C. flooding news Wednesday: Flooding fears rise in Fraser Valley as alerts, order in place

https://globalnews.ca/news/4211996/b-c-flooding-news-wednesday-flooding-...

NorthReport

Threat of heavy rain, thunderstorms for B.C. areas already hit hard by flooding

https://globalnews.ca/news/4212584/bc-flood-watch-rain-forecast/

NorthReport

The Fraser River is expected to rise another metre which means big trouble ahead

https://globalnews.ca/news/4214362/federal-assistance-military-on-way-for-b-c-flooding/

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