Abbotsford shits on homeless people

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onlinediscountanvils
Abbotsford shits on homeless people

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onlinediscountanvils

[url=http://thetyee.ca/Blogs/TheHook/2013/06/05/City-of-Abbotsford-admits-dum... of Abbotsford admits dumping chicken manure on homeless camp[/url]

Quote:
the move was just an escalation of the City’s constant attempts to drive people experiencing homelessness out of the city.

“They show up at a camp and whatever the person can’t carry away, they take and garbage,” he said.

The City began daily trips to the camp on Gladys Avenue six days ago according to Breckenridge. Today, instead of coming with a dump truck, they dumped what appeared—and smelled—to be chicken manure on the site.

6079_Smith_W

The way to turn that around is to borrow a rototiller or tractor and plough and do the obvious next thing.

MegB

Abbotsford isn't exactly a hotbed of progressive thought, but this surpasses even the worst of the city's reactionary stupidity. What kind of fool thought it would be a good idea to create a public health concern, not to mention treating the most vulnerable of its population like human trash. The City Manager should get off his ass, get out to the camp and apologize to the people affected, instead of apologizing to the media.

Beyond shameful.

quizzical

didn't Surrey do something like this a couple of years ago? or was it Langley? i remember hearing something  like this before and it didn't go over well. guess they thought it deserved a second try to see if peeps are ready to accept bad behaviour like this. for such a "christian" city one has to wonder......

6079_Smith_W

I'm not surprised at all by it; even the manure. Governments have always gone to absurd lengths in an attempt to make poor and homeless people magically disappear. Here they seem to think they can do it by bulldozing buildings; in other places they do it by destroying caravans, tents and other property.

My comment above was not a joke, by the way. The way to deal with that shit is to build a garden.

 

 

Pogo Pogo's picture

Munipalities are a branch of the provincial government.  Christy Clark should and must demand the resignation of the city manager.  Apologizing for doing this is just not enough.  Somebody should go shit on his doorstep and see how he feels about it.

Also really points out the different strains of Christianity.  Any homeless support group or committee I have served on has been dominated by people of faith (my faith being Utilitarianism).  Yet when it comes to Abbotsford where every second car has a fish on it they do this stupidity.

 

jerrym

The homeless problem extends well beyond Abbotsford. The map at the following website shows the official distribution of homeless across Metro Vancouver in 2005. If you click on a muncipality you will get a count of the homeless. This is obviously an undercount but is misleading in other ways. For example, Coquitlam with a population more than twice that of New Westminster had a homeless count of 3, while New Westminster had 92. Port Moody had none. New Westminster had three homeless shelters.

http://www.sfu.ca/geog/geog351fall06/group09/shelters.html

The Tri Cities (Coquitlam, Port Moody and Port Coquitlam) had no homeless shelters. I even remember that the Coquitlam used to bus its homeless to New Westminster, solving their having to have a homeless shelter or deal with the homeless on an ongoing basis. If you click on the map below you will get a distribution of Metro Vancouver homeless shelters.

http://www.sfu.ca/geog/geog351fall06/group09/shelters.html

Here is the commentary for this website.

Quote:

Emergency shelters are the last option for people who find themselves without a place to call home. Each night in the GVRD the number of homeless exceeds the shelter capacity (4). In 2005, a total of 2174 homeless persons we counted, while the region only has 530 permanent beds, plus approximately another 170 temporary beds (4; 5). For women who are escaping violent family situations, there is a 66% shortage of safe houses or transition-home spaces (4).

The map above shows that the majority of shelters are located in Vancouver’s inner city (4; 5). The municipalities of Burnaby, Delta, West Vancouver, Maple Ridge, and Langley have no permanent homeless shelters yet have homeless populations (4; 5). The homeless population of Surrey was counted at 371 in 2005, but the entire municipality only has two shelters (4; 5). In Richmond 33 homeless people were counted, while there are only seven beds open each night (4; 5). It is clear that the distribution and capacity of homeless shelters does not adequately address the needs of the GVRD.The Regional Homeless Plan for Greater Vancouver recognizes the need to open more shelter beds, as well as transition houses throughout the region (4). The plan also points out the importance of addressing the needs of people struggling with mental illness and addiction (4).

There are still major problems with the distribution of homeless shelters and the reluctance of some municipalities to deal with homelessness, although there is some slow improvement in some areas. 

Quote:

There are currently no permanent emergency shelter spaces in the Tri-Cities. However, the City of Coquitlam has dedicated and zoned land for a 24 hour/day, year-round, full service shelter and transitional housing facility at 3030 Gordon Ave., and in an October 12th, 2011 BC Housing media release, the province committed to funding the facility. Raincity Housing & Support Society has been selected to develop and operate the facility, and the opening is scheduled for late spring, 2014.

http://tricitiestaskforce.files.wordpress.com/2012/06/tri-cities-homeles...

 

jerrym

To suggest ways in which things can be improved so that homelessness does not become hopelessness, here is an example of municipal homelessness strategy in New Westminster that is having some success. 

Quote:

Homelessness

Homelessness Action Strategy and Needs Assessment

New Westminster, similar to other municipalities in Metro Vancouver, experienced an increase in homelessness between the regional count conducted in 2005 and the regional count conducted in 2008.  In fact, the homeless population increased from 92 to 124 or by 35% for the time period in question.  Of the homeless who were counted in 2008, 72 or 58% were living on the street. 

In response, the City of New Westminster and BC Housing, with the assistance of direct service providers to the homeless, have collaborated on a number of housing initiatives to better serve the homeless population in New Westminster and to address business and resident concerns regarding street and visible homelessness and its associated impacts.

These housing initiatives, with an emphasis on longer-term transitional and permanent supportive housing, create a continuum of housing, which will provide the stability, support and time necessary for the homeless to achieve greater independence and self-sufficiency, enabling many to permanently exit homelessness.

 

Helping Hand Brochure

The City of New Westminster publishes a Helping Hand brochure.  This publication includes a listing of community services and supports.  More specifically, it includes information on emergency, transitional and supportive housing; transition and second stage housing for women; addiction and mental health services; drop-in and meal programs; education and job training opportunities; and government services.

http://www.newwestcity.ca/business/planning_development/social_planning/...

 

 

Michelle

Pogo wrote:

Munipalities are a branch of the provincial government.  Christy Clark should and must demand the resignation of the city manager.  Apologizing for doing this is just not enough.  Somebody should go shit on his doorstep and see how he feels about it.

That sounds like an excellent protest idea!  Everyone should dump their cat litter in his yard.

onlinediscountanvils

Michelle wrote:

Pogo wrote:

Munipalities are a branch of the provincial government.  Christy Clark should and must demand the resignation of the city manager.  Apologizing for doing this is just not enough.  Somebody should go shit on his doorstep and see how he feels about it.

That sounds like an excellent protest idea!  Everyone should dump their cat litter in his yard.

The Great Abbotsford Shit-in of '13.

addictedtomyipod

I have been to Abbotsford and it is a really crappy city.

Pogo Pogo's picture

I agree.  I wasn't proposing it as a strategy.  I was just venting because I found the act so repulsive.  Isn't a cornerstone of common law that a peron's home is his/her castle and shouldn't that apply to the homeless in some form?

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

The cornerstone of the common law is that the castle belongs to the master and the commoners have no rights.  Commoners do not get rights under our property system they get charged with trespassing on the master's domain.

 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

There is not much protection for the homeless in any area of our law.  In Burnaby advocates tell me that the RCMP routinely rousts people from their sleeping spaces and often steal their belongings to "dispose" of.

Quote:

RIGHTS NOT PROTECTED

There is little doubt that violence against homeless people occurs at an alarming rate, but it is not always understood why this is the case. There is the obvious reality that homeless people spend a lot of time outside during the night in public spaces. However, there are other factors at play, particularly that homeless people are criminalized by virtue of their poverty and lack of secure housing.

There is also the fact that despite their visible marginalization, homeless people as a class are not protected by provincial or federal rights codes. These two factors, taken together, create conditions that make homeless people particularly vulnerable to targeted and opportunistic violence.

Criminalization of homeless people is embodied in provincial statutes and municipal bylaws, which regulate where people can or cannot sleep outside. In Vancouver, the set of three bylaws governing public property effectively prohibit homeless people from legally sleeping outdoors anywhere within the confines of the city. Violators are subject to civil fines and criminal charges.

But it's not only that act of sleeping outside that brings homeless individuals into conflict with the criminal law. As a group, homeless individuals are more likely to be charged with minor property offences, drug offences, and violations of bylaws compared to those with a fixed address. Homeless people regularly receive tickets for vending, jaywalking and setting up tents on public property.

Because it is often difficult for homeless people to negotiate the complex justice system, what begins as a municipal bylaw ticket often escalates into more serious charges resulting from missed appointments and court appearances.

http://www.pivotlegal.org/homeless_people_need_protection_under_the_law_not

Aristotleded24

kropotkin1951 wrote:
Quote:
Criminalization of homeless people is embodied in provincial statutes and municipal bylaws, which regulate where people can or cannot sleep outside. In Vancouver, the set of three bylaws governing public property effectively prohibit homeless people from legally sleeping outdoors anywhere within the confines of the city. Violators are subject to civil fines and criminal charges.

But it's not only that act of sleeping outside that brings homeless individuals into conflict with the criminal law. As a group, homeless individuals are more likely to be charged with minor property offences, drug offences, and violations of bylaws compared to those with a fixed address. Homeless people regularly receive tickets for vending, jaywalking and setting up tents on public property.

Because it is often difficult for homeless people to negotiate the complex justice system, what begins as a municipal bylaw ticket often escalates into more serious charges resulting from missed appointments and court appearances.

">http://www.pivotlegal.org/homeless_people_need_protection_under_the_law_...

Hey krop, if I was to be robbed on the street while in Vancouver or Brunaby, and I were to call the police right away, what kind of a response time could I expect?

jerrym

Michelle wrote:

Pogo wrote:

Munipalities are a branch of the provincial government.  Christy Clark should and must demand the resignation of the city manager.  Apologizing for doing this is just not enough.  Somebody should go shit on his doorstep and see how he feels about it.

That sounds like an excellent protest idea!  Everyone should dump their cat litter in his yard.

This might give you a sense of satisfaction but it will not help the homeless. The mayor and allies either directly or indirectly will say that is what you get from this kind of people. While an NDP government might do something (it's questionable), Christy will blow it off as a municipal responsibility and do nothing. 

To me a much better way is to start asking why the Abbotsford homeless do not have adequate shelters? Is the Abbotsford municiapal administration a bunch of freeloaders trying to dump the costs of this on neighbouring communities? Do they really want this to be the image of a city of over 100,000? Where is your homeless plan to create shelters? Why don't you have one? Don't you realize that you are going to have an ongoing image problem if you don't have one and you're not going to start one? Do you realize that the media attention is only going to get worse if you do not start working on this? Why can't you do as much as some neighbouring communities? If you do nothing, do you realize you could start facing a boycott (tourism, etc.)?

When New Westminster had three homeless shelters and the neighbouring Tricities of Coquitlam, Port Moody, and Port Coquitlam had none, the local New Westminster paper started running front page articles about the Tricities bussing homeless to New Westminster, implying that the TriCities were freeloading on New Westminster. The mayor also commented on the situation. The Tricities got the message and now have a homeless plan and will be opening up a shelter next year. 

In other words find allies in the media, Abbotsford and neighbouring communities to keep the pressure up, so that it's easier to deal with the homeless problem than not.  A similar strategy can be used at the provincial level. 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

I have no idea. However if it is the police stealing the homeless's possessions they are already there but they don't respond to their complaints.

Aristotleded24

kropotkin1951 wrote:
I have no idea. However if it is the police stealing the homeless's possessions they are already there but they don't respond to their complaints.

And yet, there's a probable chance that if I was robbed on the street and called the police right away, they might arrive in time to "file a report" without catching the person responsible?

When it comes to the "free market," I can't imagine any transaction that emulates that ideal more than someone washing my car window and letting me decide how much that is worth. Anecdotally, it seems that I see more people standing on boulevards holding up signs asking for money now than I did say 10 or 15 years ago (perhaps a function of living in a bigger city?) and it's not just young kids. And yet, it's the free market types that are pushing loudest for "agressive panhandling" laws (which is ridiculous in itself, because it's already illegal to violently ask someone for money, there's a legal, technical term for that called "robbery") or what have you. In other words, when it comes to people earning money outside the market economic system, instead of trying to honestly compete, the market system is driven to criminalize those outside of it.

onlinediscountanvils

[url=http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2013/07/05/bc-abbot... dump at B.C. homeless camp could mean civil lawsuit[/url]

Quote:
The group, being represented by the Pivot Legal Society, has issued a notice of damage to the city, saying they are contemplating a civil suit for “discrimination, harassment and loss of property.”

Quote:
Abbotsford’s police chief revealed he was investigating allegations police officers slashed tents belonging to homeless people.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Abbotsford: Homeless Camp Under Siege (pics)

The dozen people still living in a tent village in Abbotsford think this could be their last day somewhere dry and out of the wind.

The City has ordered them off the empty provincially-owned parking lot beside Jubilee Park, where they had been camping since October.  Several say they think the city and police will move in and dismantle their homeless camp while they are at the courthouse tomorrow (Tuesday) fighting the city's determined effort to make them go away.

A BC Supreme court order deadline to vacate the site came and went on Saturday without any action from the city. Pivot Legal is representing the campers, and plans to ask for an injunction to stay the order until a full hearing can be made in court....

  http://vancouver.mediacoop.ca/photo/abbotsford-homeless-camp-under-seige...