NDP BC Premier John Horgan Is the Real Deal and Shows His Leadership Skills

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NorthReport

Review: A Matter of Confidence is a Canadian politics must-read

 

In this age of short attention spans, it is easy to forget what a momentous day it was that unfolded on June 29, 2017 to give British Columbia its first NDP premier in 16 years. In B.C.’s long, colourful, no-holds-barred political history, there has been no parallel to the day itself and the riveting events leading up to Lieutenant-Governor Judith Guichon’s decision to call on NDP Leader John Horgan to govern, rather than accept premier Christy Clark’s desperate pleadings for an election.

It was drama of the highest order. Yet it might soon have faded from memory had it not been for two legislative reporters with a ringside seat for every twist and turn. Rob Shaw of the Vancouver Sun and Richard Zussman, then of CBC, felt these historic happenings deserved a closer look. (Mr. Zussman is now with Global News, after being fired by the CBC for allegedly breaching its guidelines with his work on this book.)

The result, produced in an astonishingly short time, is their book, A Matter of Confidence, and it’s a winner – a well-written, compelling and fast-paced narrative that does ample justice to the unprecedented circumstances that yielded such a seismic shift in B.C.’s political landscape.

Thanks to a wealth of interviews with key participants, whose memories, and scars, were still fresh, the authors puncture the secrecy of the backrooms, allowing us to listen in on closed-door discussions by players from all three parties that went on before, during and after an election campaign, which ended with the upstart Greens holding the balance of power. Even though we know Horgan wound up as Premier, one still keeps turning the page to see how it all transpired behind the scenes. The pressure-packed, back-and-forth negotiations leading to the Greens’ landmark alliance with the NDP and their spurning of all BC Liberal entreaties, despite a final session in the Harbour Towers penthouse suite with a deliberately well-stocked liquor cabinet, are recounted in rich detail.

A similar light is shone on the many emotions that spilled out in private on June 29, as the government was toppled on a no-confidence motion and the province’s political future was determined by a vice-regal appointee. We also learn with delight that Clark and the Lieutenant-Governor switched from tea to wine, when it became evident their meeting was not going to go Clark’s way. And Horgan, nervously catching and re-tossing a lacrosse ball against the wall of his office as he waited for news, was summoned to Government House by the LG’s private secretary who told chief of staff Bob Dewar over the phone: “This is your million-dollar call.” History on the run has rarely been better told.

Among the book’s more substantive revelations is the full story of the NDP’s high-profile election promise to completely eliminate all bridge tolls. The politically popular vow was actually made up on the fly, mere hours after the Liberals unveiled a plan to cut tolls in half. The authors point to this as a key turning point in a campaign most observers expected the party to lose, not only stealing the Liberals’ thunder but serving notice that the often lead-footed NDP was serious about winning. In fact, the ebbs and flows of the entire campaign are well-told, providing an insider’s view of the indecision, gaffes and overconfidence that marked Liberal efforts to woo voters, and how everything appeared to go just right for the NDP. That was the precise opposite of the way their respective campaigns went four years earlier.

I enjoyed discovering, too, that then-Liberal health minister Terry Lake lobbied heavily for a payroll tax to help cover his government’s promised elimination of health-care premiums. His view was nixed by Clark. The current NDP government subsequently embraced Mr. Lake’s belief in a payroll tax, to withering criticism from the Liberals. Revealed as well is a startling tension that lingered for quite a while between Horgan and David Eby, now Attorney-General, until relations were smoothed over in the fall of 2016.

One of the strongest sections of the book is its well-documented description of Horgan’s transformation from an edgy, uncertain leader who thought about quitting into a seemingly serene “happy warrior,” comfortable with himself and energized to shoulder the responsibilities of leadership. A major reason, the authors contend, was Horgan’s willingness to listen to his advisers, brought in from the outside to provide a fresh approach to the tired tactics that had failed the NDP again and again.

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/books/reviews/article-review-a-matt...

NorthReport

Perhaps this is the key to real political success - choose someone for Leader who doesn't have an enlarged ego, nor someone who wants to keep the rich, rich, and the poor, poor. Someone like John Horgan, the most popular Premier in Canada, who didn't want the job!

Book excerpt: The rise of an unwilling B.C. NDP leader

http://www.timescolonist.com/life/islander/book-excerpt-the-rise-of-an-u...

 

Martin N.

NorthReport wrote:

Perhaps this is the key to real political success - choose someone for Leader who doesn't have an enlarged ego, nor someone who wants to keep the rich, rich, and the poor, poor. Someone like John Horgan, the most popular Premier in Canada, who didn't want the job!

Book excerpt: The rise of an unwilling B.C. NDP leader

http://www.timescolonist.com/life/islander/book-excerpt-the-rise-of-an-u...

 

Yes. A very successful leader. After pushing Site C through to completion and enthusiastically endorsing LNG exports, his remaining challenge will be to finesse Trans Mountain construction while appearing to oppose it.

By the time the greenweaver twigs onto the fact that proportional representation was not, is not and never will be on the sunshine list, Horgan will be well on the way to a majority, dragging a truculent Dipper environazi wing and stunned Green rump along in his considerable wake.

A consummate politician indeed.

Martin N.

Not much interest in this topic since Premier Horgan hoisted the greenweaver on his own petard.

Aristotleded24

Martin N. wrote:
NorthReport wrote:

Perhaps this is the key to real political success - choose someone for Leader who doesn't have an enlarged ego, nor someone who wants to keep the rich, rich, and the poor, poor. Someone like John Horgan, the most popular Premier in Canada, who didn't want the job!

Book excerpt: The rise of an unwilling B.C. NDP leader

http://www.timescolonist.com/life/islander/book-excerpt-the-rise-of-an-u...

 

Yes. A very successful leader. After pushing Site C through to completion and enthusiastically endorsing LNG exports, his remaining challenge will be to finesse Trans Mountain construction while appearing to oppose it.

By the time the greenweaver twigs onto the fact that proportional representation was not, is not and never will be on the sunshine list, Horgan will be well on the way to a majority, dragging a truculent Dipper environazi wing and stunned Green rump along in his considerable wake.

A consummate politician indeed.

Which is why the latest Mainstreet poll for BC, as of March 5-6, shows the Greens cracking the 20% mark at NDP expense?

Martin N.

In the 'decided and leaning voters'  category but only 17.9% when all voters are included.

All Voters

Decided and Leaning Voters

All Voters30.2%25%17.9%7.4%2%17.6%

Martin N.

Martin N.

Tried to bring poll images up to no avail. Interesting that Green support in the decided and leaning category was rather consistently above 20% provincewide rather than just their power base in herbivore country of southern Van Isle.

NorthReport
NorthReport

Congratulations to BC NDP Premier John Horgan, Environment Minister George Heyman, and the rest of the BC NDP Caucus, as together with the First Nations peoples and the rest of the protesters, you may have well stopped the Kinder Morgan project, and put an end to the increased tanker traffic in Burrard Inlet. 

Kinder Morgan halts most work on disputed Canada pipeline expansion

https://www.reuters.com/article/us-kinder-morgan-cn-pipeline/kinder-morg...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Burrard_Inlet#/media/File:Burrard-Inlet-ma...

Martin N.

All Kinder Morgan has done is drop a hand grenade down the back of the PM's pants. Politically, Skippy can't sit on the fence any longer - either he loses the anti vote or the pro vote. Since any federal election is decided at the Ontario border, exchanging a few Liberal seats in Vancouver for a few Interior seats is a wash.

KM has now painted Trudeau into a corner by putting the success or failure of Trans Mountain squarely on his shoulders. Trudeau will not only reap the consequences of failure but also the cost of claims under NAFTA and any other remedies.

All in all, Trudeau will make the decision based upon what is best for himself personally and, by extension, the LPC. He is quite capable of blithely reneging on his word and going on another vacation, after all, it's not his money he is squandering.

NorthReport
NorthReport
Pondering

Martin N. wrote:

All Kinder Morgan has done is drop a hand grenade down the back of the PM's pants. Politically, Skippy can't sit on the fence any longer - either he loses the anti vote or the pro vote. Since any federal election is decided at the Ontario border, exchanging a few Liberal seats in Vancouver for a few Interior seats is a wash.

KM has now painted Trudeau into a corner by putting the success or failure of Trans Mountain squarely on his shoulders. Trudeau will not only reap the consequences of failure but also the cost of claims under NAFTA and any other remedies.

All in all, Trudeau will make the decision based upon what is best for himself personally and, by extension, the LPC. He is quite capable of blithely reneging on his word and going on another vacation, after all, it's not his money he is squandering.

What action do you propose he take? Or is this just a matter of "do something" with no suggestion as to what that might be?

mmphosis

"Governments might grant permits, but only communities can grant permission."

-- Justin Trudeau 

Martin N.

Pondering wrote:

Martin N. wrote:

All Kinder Morgan has done is drop a hand grenade down the back of the PM's pants. Politically, Skippy can't sit on the fence any longer - either he loses the anti vote or the pro vote. Since any federal election is decided at the Ontario border, exchanging a few Liberal seats in Vancouver for a few Interior seats is a wash.

KM has now painted Trudeau into a corner by putting the success or failure of Trans Mountain squarely on his shoulders. Trudeau will not only reap the consequences of failure but also the cost of claims under NAFTA and any other remedies.

All in all, Trudeau will make the decision based upon what is best for himself personally and, by extension, the LPC. He is quite capable of blithely reneging on his word and going on another vacation, after all, it's not his money he is squandering.

What action do you propose he take? Or is this just a matter of "do something" with no suggestion as to what that might be?

I suggest he take a stand and enforce the authority of the federal government to either build the pipeline or to cancel it. Skippy had no problem cancelling Gateway so, either enforce the law or cave in to mob rule. Heads he loses, Tails he loses and the nation suffers a fractured confederation. Humpty will not be put together again - the tasty bits of the Balkanized confederation will be welcomed into the USA while the drains on the cash flow will be left to rot.

NorthReport

Hey chicken little, the sky is falling!

What nonsense.

There are other viable routes that don’t bring about a massive increase in tanker traffic in the Vancouver area Come on Canada use your brain 

http://business.financialpost.com/commodities/energy/the-many-ways-b-c-premier-john-horgan-is-wrong-about-trans-mountain

NorthReport

Hey chicken little, the sky is falling!

What nonsense.

There are other viable routes that don’t bring about a massive increase in tanker traffic in the Vancouver area Come on Canada use your brain 

http://business.financialpost.com/commodities/energy/the-many-ways-b-c-premier-john-horgan-is-wrong-about-trans-mountain

Martin N.

mmphosis wrote:

"Governments might grant permits, but only communities can grant permission."

-- Justin Trudeau 

Is that not the stupidest statement ever made by the leader of a western democracy? Groucho Marx would have dined out on that for decades.

Well, boy blunder is reaping the rewards of telling the anarchists they won isn't he? A just society runs by rule of law, not mob rule.

NorthReport

Dp

NorthReport
NorthReport

Community input is now “mob rule”.

Go figure.

https://www.mass-culture.org/community_input.aspx

 

Martin N.

NorthReport wrote:

Hey chicken little, the sky is falling!

What nonsense.

There are other viable routes that don’t bring about a massive increase in tanker traffic in the Vancouver area Come on Canada use your brain 

http://business.financialpost.com/commodities/energy/the-many-ways-b-c-premier-john-horgan-is-wrong-about-trans-mountain

The west coast lunatics protest absolutely everything from a variance for a deck to highway widening to pipelines. Absolutely everything.

NorthReport

Maybe it’s time Vancouver forced the waiting freighters to start waiting someplace else or make them turn their Diesel engines off rather than have them polute the Vancouver area for days, weeks and sometimes months at a time.

Martin N.

NorthReport wrote:

Community input is now “mob rule”.

Go figure.

https://www.mass-culture.org/community_input.aspx

 

No, breaking the law in a large group is mob rule. Community input is welcomed, criminal contempt of court, not so much.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:

"Governments might grant permits, but only communities can grant permission."

-- Justin Trudeau

This is exactly why Canada abolished appropriation.  From now on, if someone's not on board, they just build the highway around them, or the skyscraper over them.  It wouldn't be fair to put the interests of the many ahead of the interests of the few.

NorthReport

BC NDP Premier and anti Kinder Morgan  pipeline project John Horgan is looking mighty fine. 

Dance a little jig and take a little bow tonite John!

http://vancouversun.com/business/local-business/is-the-b-c-government-winning-its-fight-to-stop-the-trans-mountain-oil-pipeline

NorthReport
NorthReport

BC Hero shows how it’s done

Horga  not giving an inch in Kinder Morgan fight

http://vancouversun.com/opinion/columnists/vaughn-palmer-horgan-not-giving-an-inch-in-kinder-morgan-fight

Pondering

Martin N. wrote:
 I suggest he take a stand and enforce the authority of the federal government to either build the pipeline or to cancel it. Skippy had no problem cancelling Gateway so, either enforce the law or cave in to mob rule. Heads he loses, Tails he loses and the nation suffers a fractured confederation. Humpty will not be put together again - the tasty bits of the Balkanized confederation will be welcomed into the USA while the drains on the cash flow will be left to rot.

You are misinformed on the law.

Horgan half-hinted at a more constructive possibility with references to B.C.’s earlier invitation to the federal and Alberta governments to join the province in asking the courts to resolve the jurisdictional question.

“They declined to do so,” noted Horgan, leaving open the possibility that the offer still stands if there were a change of minds in Ottawa and/or Edmonton.

Risky as one never knows what the courts will do with a dispute as political as this. Plus the reference case would leave the question of how to placate Kinder Morgan while the judges sort things out.

Trudeau did take a stand. I am asking, specifically, how far you think Trudeau should go to "enforce the law".  Are you saying he should send in the troops to physically protect construction sites?  Shouldn't he at least wait until all the court cases are over?

 

Pondering

More positive fall-out!

“The current developments are a real test of Canada’s commitment to the rule of law and the ability of any resource company to rely on the legal approval process for projects,” said Dwight Newman, one of Canada’s top constitutional scholars and Munk senior fellow at the Macdonald-Laurier Institute.

http://business.financialpost.com/commodities/energy/the-many-ways-b-c-p...

Maybe it will become a lot easier to nationalize resource extraction. Hydro Quebec has been wonderful for us. 

NorthReport

Mulroney again.

The damage he singlehandly has done to Canada unfortunately is staggering.

But Justin will never in a million years exhibit the brilliance of his Dad

http://canadahistory.com/sections/Eras/trudeau/petro_canada.htm

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

B.C.’s Narrow Fracking Review Doesn’t Serve the Public Interest

By Amy Lubik, Ben Parfitt and Grand Chief Stewart Phillip

Just two days before B.C. Energy Minister Michelle Mungall announced a completely inadequate “independent scientific review” of fracking in our province, an international team of scientists issued a stark warning about the human health risks associated with the natural gas industry's rampant use of this brute force technology.

“Our examination…uncovered no evidence that fracking can be practiced in a manner that does not threaten human health,” concluded the scientists, who were affiliated either with the Concerned Health Professionals of New York or the Nobel Peace Prize-winning group, Physicians for Social Responsibility.

Tellingly, the scientific review just announced by the B.C. government will expressly not investigate the human health impacts of fracking.

Fracking involves pressure-pumping immense quantities of water, sand and chemicals underground with such force that earthquakes are frequently triggered. Northeast B.C. has the dubious distinction of being home to some of the most powerful fracking operations on earth, and much of the resulting damage occurs on Indigenous territories.

The evidence reviewed by the scientists included nearly 1,300 peer-reviewed articles. That fact alone tells you something. The “science” on fracking is already in.

And here's just a smattering of what it says:

People living near gas drilling and fracking operations are more prone to asthma. Pregnant women living near drilled and fracked gas wells face elevated risks of giving birth to newborns with congenital heart defects. Workers servicing gas well sites are exposed to high levels of silica, diesel exhaust, and volatile organic compounds that raise concerns about higher incidence of occupational lung diseases, including silicosis, asthma, and lung cancer.

For Indigenous people living in fracking zones, the impacts of fossil fuel industry operations only add to the disproportionately poor health statistics they already face.

A preliminary scientific study published this January by health scientists at the University of Montreal, for example, found that pregnant women in northeast B.C. have elevated levels of benzene metabolites (benzene is a carcinogen) in their blood. The 15 pregnant Indigenous women in the study had levels six times higher than the Canadian average.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..more from the above article

quote:

For these reasons and others, the organizations we represent and 14 others last fall called for a full public inquiry into all aspects of fracking operations in our province. We made that call because of abundant evidence that fracking in northeast B.C. was intensifying and that B.C.'s energy industry regulator, the Oil and Gas Commission, was failing to provide reasonable checks on fossil fuel industry excesses.

In issuing our collective call we said then — and we restate now — that a scientific “review” will not deliver meaningful changes. The people who live in the northeast, who drink the region's water, who breathe its air, deserve nothing less than a full public inquiry into all aspects of fossil fuel industry operations.

It must also fully addresses the question of free, prior and informed consent, a cornerstone of the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which Michelle Mungall and all her Cabinet colleagues are tasked by Premier John Horgan to implement.

Now, sadly, we have even more reason to oppose a “scientific review.” Here's why.

The review will be extremely narrowly focussed. Minister Mungall has tasked three scientists to look at water usage in fracking operations, examine earthquakes triggered by such operations and determine what methane may be vented into the atmosphere during fracking operations themselves. The panel is to make “recommendations” on how to “minimize” environmental risks.

Troublingly, at least one senior member of Mungall's ministry (an assistant deputy minister) communicated with the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP) well before the panel was struck. Consequently, the association, which represents the very companies that are fracking in the province, received generous forewarning that the review would not look at the human health impacts associated with fracking or at the fossil fuel industry's ballooning greenhouse gas emissions.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

a letter from horgan to...Link

July 18, 2017

Honourable Michelle Mungall

Minister of Energy, Mines, and Petroleum Resources Parliament Buildings

Victoria, British Columbia

V8V 1X4

Dear Minister Mungall:

Congratulations on your new appointment as Minister of Energy, Mines, and Petroleum Resources.

It has never been more important for new leadership that works for ordinary people, not just those at the top.

It is your job to deliver that leadership in your ministry

quote:

As part of our commitment to true, lasting reconciliation with First Nations in British Columbia our government will be fully adopting and implementing the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (UNDRIP), and the Calls to Action of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission. As minister, you are responsible for moving forward on the calls to action and reviewing policies, programs, and legislation to determine how to bring the principles of the declaration into action in British Columbia.

NorthReport

John Horgan is doing a great job of standing up for the environment and protecting BC's Coast!

The Fatal Costs of Kinder Morgan

Exporting oil — like exporting fentanyl — is a death sentence for some.

https://thetyee.ca/Opinion/2018/04/10/Fatal-Costs-Kinder-Morgan/

NorthReport

Dirty rotten Trudeau and his equally rotten sidekick Wilkinson

Death of Kinder Morgan Project a Campaign Promise, Premier Says

 

Facing charges that B.C.’s opposition to the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion is killing the project and signalling the province is closed to investment, Premier John Horgan said the government is just following through on its election promises.

“We had an election campaign about 12 months ago, and during that time we on this side of the house ... campaigned in the best interest of protecting our air, water and land and ensuring that we could protect our coast,” Horgan said.

“We were abundantly clear about our view on a particular project,” he said without naming Trans Mountain. “We were abundantly clear about our concerns about a lack of federal action to protect our marine environment, and we put that question before the public and they spoke.”

https://thetyee.ca/News/2018/04/10/Death-Kinder-Morgan-Campaign-Promise/

NorthReport

A Matter of Confidence gives insiders an intimate look into B.C. politics

https://www.nationalobserver.com/2018/04/10/opinion/matter-confidence-gi...

Martin N.

Pondering wrote:

Martin N. wrote:
 I suggest he take a stand and enforce the authority of the federal government to either build the pipeline or to cancel it. Skippy had no problem cancelling Gateway so, either enforce the law or cave in to mob rule. Heads he loses, Tails he loses and the nation suffers a fractured confederation. Humpty will not be put together again - the tasty bits of the Balkanized confederation will be welcomed into the USA while the drains on the cash flow will be left to rot.

You are misinformed on the law.

Horgan half-hinted at a more constructive possibility with references to B.C.’s earlier invitation to the federal and Alberta governments to join the province in asking the courts to resolve the jurisdictional question.

“They declined to do so,” noted Horgan, leaving open the possibility that the offer still stands if there were a change of minds in Ottawa and/or Edmonton.

Risky as one never knows what the courts will do with a dispute as political as this. Plus the reference case would leave the question of how to placate Kinder Morgan while the judges sort things out.

Trudeau did take a stand. I am asking, specifically, how far you think Trudeau should go to "enforce the law".  Are you saying he should send in the troops to physically protect construction sites?  Shouldn't he at least wait until all the court cases are over?

 

You are misinformed on the law. The PM does not enforce the law, the relevant authorities ie: the police and the courts do. The authorities are doing a competent job and protesters should be aware of the effects of a criminal conviction on their employment and travel opportunities.

You are also uninformed about the ability of the PM to "send in the troops". What the government can do is invoke the Emergency Measures Act, the former War M. A., and turn over authority for the named crisis from civilian control to the military. 

The 'court cases' are not about the federal government's authority under the Constitution Act, they are delaying tactics to frustrate both the legal rights of KM under the federal authority and under the provincial authority of the previous government ie: the rule of law. KM has won all 14 of 14 court challenges so at what point do you consider further court challenges to be harassment rather than legal precedent?

That said, I think the upcoming federal Court of Appeal decision will either affirm the rule of law or open up a whole new constitutional crisis by invalidating to a degree the federal authority under Sec 92. to regulate interprovincial trade. Considering the number of occasions that the Feds have refused to exercise their powers, the court may well find so if of an activist bent.

 

NorthReport

dp

NorthReport
NorthReport
NorthReport
NorthReport

Horgan must have some excellent constitutional advisers as that was a brilliant move on his part to being Quebec into the Kinder Morgan issue.

Pondering

Martin N. wrote:

The 'court cases' are not about the federal government's authority under the Constitution Act, they are delaying tactics to frustrate both the legal rights of KM under the federal authority and under the provincial authority of the previous government ie: the rule of law. KM has won all 14 of 14 court challenges so at what point do you consider further court challenges to be harassment rather than legal precedent?

That said, I think the upcoming federal Court of Appeal decision will either affirm the rule of law or open up a whole new constitutional crisis by invalidating to a degree the federal authority under Sec 92. to regulate interprovincial trade. Considering the number of occasions that the Feds have refused to exercise their powers, the court may well find so if of an activist bent.

In Canada, the living constitution is described under the living tree doctrine.

Unlike the case of the United States, the fact that the constitution of Canada was intended from the outset to encompass unwritten conventions and legal principles is beyond question. For example, the text of the constitution does not mention the office of prime minister or that the governor general always grants royal assent to bills. Principles such as democracy, the Implied Bill of Rights, the rule of law, and judicial independence are held to derive in part from the preamble of the constitution, which declared the constitution of Canada to be "similar in principle" to that of the United Kingdom.

The concept of an evolving constitution has notably been applied to determine the division of powers between provinces and the federal government in areas of jurisdiction not contemplated at the time of enactment of the British North America Act. For example, authority over broadcasting has been held to fall within the federal "peace, order and good government" power.

The Supreme Court of Canada, in Re: Same-Sex Marriage (2004), held that Parliament (as opposed to provincial legislatures) had the power to define marriage as including same-sex unions. It rejected claims that the constitutionally enumerated federal authority in matters of "Marriage and Divorce" could not include same-sex marriage because marriage as conceived in 1867 was necessarily opposite-sex:

The "frozen concepts" reasoning runs contrary to one of the most fundamental principles of Canadian constitutional interpretation: that our Constitution is a living tree which, by way of progressive interpretation, accommodates and addresses the realities of modern life.[36]

Our judges are intended to be activist. The Supreme Court has the power to refuse cases but in this instance it's just a reference question not a court case. 

You can speculate on the motives of the BC government. I do believe they genuinely want to protect BC from bitumen. I think I read that the studies proporting to prove its safety have not been made public. 

Pondering

NorthReport wrote:

Horgan must have some excellent constitutional advisers as that was a brilliant move on his part to being Quebec into the Kinder Morgan issue.

He didn't bring Quebec into it. Quebec jumped in of its own accord because this would set a precedence. Quebec is just the first province to consider how such a precedence would impact their own powers. 

Martin N.

The authors of the BNA could not have foreseen the constitutional landscape 150 years into the future. On a logical level, it makes sense to renegotiate a 'living' constitution but on any other level, it is insane to attempt it. The only route open is its interpretation by the SCC.

A civil society is only civil due to the rule of law.

Pondering

Martin N. wrote:

The authors of the BNA could not have foreseen the constitutional landscape 150 years into the future. On a logical level, it makes sense to renegotiate a 'living' constitution but on any other level, it is insane to attempt it. The only route open is its interpretation by the SCC.

A civil society is only civil due to the rule of law.

There is nothing insane about the Supreme Court of Canada interpreting the Constitution based on modern times. So far I would say it has worked very well for Canada. It is still the rule of law. 

Horgan has stated that he will abide by the decision of the Supreme Court. 

There are still unresolved cases in the courts that haven't even made it to the Supreme Court yet so Horgan isn't causing any delay. 

If Kinder Morgan pulls out, I wonder if the court cases still go forward. 

Martin N.

The only practical method of proceeding is via interpretation by the SCC is what I said. 

The insanity rests in the Feds and provinces attempting another Meech Lake or  Charlottown fiasco. Even a bear on a unicycle and some calliope tunes couldn't salvage a mess like that. 

Yeah, I agree with the wisdom of the Supremes. I've actually waded through a couple of their decisions and, to me, tyro though I am, they are even handed and fair.

Martin N.

I wonder how long Heyman can stall before presenting the substance of their case. No matter what, TransMountain will be built long before this case ever reaches the high court. 

Provincial jurisdiction on the coasts ends at the high water mark. The Feds have constitutional authority over the entire marine environment. There is no precedent for challenging this authority and it is doubtful the SCC will set one.

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