One hour from Vancouver to Seattle. Sweet!

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NorthReport
One hour from Vancouver to Seattle. Sweet!

!!!

NorthReport
lagatta4

That is a laudable initiative, but while rail is by far preferable to air, high-speed rail corridors can also have significant negative environmental impacts, and the project requires careful study. Sometimes simply optimizing existing rail corridors can be almost as efficient (perhaps a bit less ultra-fast) with fewer such negatives. The reason I speak of this, though IANAE (I am not an engineer), is discussions from friends in the region between Lyon and Turin, where a TGV is proposed; it could have serious impacts on Alpine flora and fauna. Environmental associations, which DO have engineers and other experts, have put forth a solution with a far lower impact that would be almost as rapid.

And what about ferries? I ask this in relative ignorance of the region; I've only travelled to Vancouver once, for work, and saw very little of the beautiful region.

NorthReport

Presently there is Ferry Service between Victoria on Vancouver Island and Seattle.

 

NorthReport

Le trajet Vancouver-Seattle en une heure à l’étude 

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/nouvelle/1016810/train-grande-vitesse-vancouv...

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

lagatta4 wrote:

And what about ferries? I ask this in relative ignorance of the region; I've only travelled to Vancouver once, for work, and saw very little of the beautiful region.

Vancouver to Seattle driving time is 3 hours so a ferry would likely be a much slower trip and far more expensive than the other options already available. The current rail line is not suitable for a high speed train especially the part of the line that runs right though the resort town of White Rock. 

All in all an interesting idea but not a big priority I would think. Seattle traffic is freeway based and like most cities with freeways they turn into parking lots way to often.

Quote:

SEATTLE TO

VANCOUVER, B.C.

By wheels: Once upon a time, there was floatplane service between Seattle’s Lake Union and Vancouver. Alas, it went belly up many years ago, leaving road or rail the main ways to go.

My favorite: the Amtrak Cascades train with two daily round trips between Seattle and Vancouver, B.C. It’s a comfortable and scenic ride, with much of the route hugging the shoreline. Read, use your laptop (there’s basic Wi-Fi) or just gaze out the big windows. (Hint: Sit on the left side of the train northbound and the right southbound for the best views.)

The train is far from high-speed, however. Convoluted and congested tracks, especially in B.C., make the one-way trip take about four hours (versus three hours driving).

Otherwise, drive to Vancouver. It’s a straight shot up Interstate 5 to the Canada-U.S. border at Blaine, Whatcom County, and then onward to Vancouver. The drive takes about three hours, although border-crossing congestion on weekends, especially in summer, can lengthen the trip by an hour or more, especially returning to the U.S.

Want someone else to drive? Greyhound buses have daily trips between Seattle and Vancouver. Quick Shuttle buses serve the airports and downtowns of both cities year-round, and the cruise ship docks in Vancouver in summer. Or take the Bolt Bus, a budget, book-online-bus service between the two cities (fares sometimes $15 one way or lower).

By air: There are flights from Sea-Tac Airport to Vancouver’s airport, but given the hours needed for check-in/security/customs, it’s not always a time- or cost-effective way to go.

http://www.seattletimes.com/life/travel/how-to-travel-between-seattle-vi...

 

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

The big drawback to driving between Seattle and Vancouver(or vice versa) is that you can spend a huge amount of time waiting in your car at the border and neither Canada nor U.S. customs have public restrooms in their building.  You'd think they could at least put in some port-o-sans just over the border on either side.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Ken Burch wrote:

The big drawback to driving between Seattle and Vancouver(or vice versa) is that you can spend a huge amount of time waiting in your car at the border and neither Canada nor U.S. customs have public restrooms in their building.  You'd think they could at least put in some port-o-sans just over the border on either side.

That is why Trudeau is signing on to having US Custome working on Canadian soil at places like train stations. I don't like that kind of integration with the US however for some people it is more convenienent.

KenS

I like the idea of port-a-potties flanking the Peace Arch, east and west.

Mind you, they would be a bit of hike.