So which LNG plants will be going ahead and in what order in BC 2

168 posts / 0 new
Last post
NorthReport
NorthReport

Enbridge to restart 2nd natural gas pipeline after explosion near Prince George

https://globalnews.ca/news/4535905/enbridge-restart-gas-line-pipeline-ex...

NorthReport

Metro Vancouver could see 8-cent gas price hike after pipeline explosion: analyst

https://globalnews.ca/news/4535719/gas-price-hike-pipeline-explosion/

NorthReport
Martin N.

quizzical wrote:

Martin n you paid money to rabble so you could verbally abuse people i see.

good on ya...let's  us know you really go above and beyond to be a dick.

Yeah apparently anyone mentioning fundraising is an abusive dick around you cheapskates. Only the Skipper and his Gilligan were bold enough to confess to monthly donations and Ultimate Authority can only plead so much without losing credibility.

So, quizzical, how much are you kicking in or do you consider setting the heretic straight a donation in kind? I pay solid, if devalued Canuckistan Loonies so you can have the privilege of calling me an abusive dick. Fair enough but how about you pony up a $50 bill for all the smug righteousness engendered by burning this heretic at the metaphorical stake.

One can assume that this community is so destitute that pecuniary straits forbear monitary donations but, in less PC minds, it is more likely just cheap freeloaders using the facilities and not even bothering to leave a button in the collection plate. The socialist mindset that their high opinion is so sacrosanct that others are blessed to pay for delivery.

If you dont have any money, collect a shopping cart full of your neighbours' empties - no excuses are acceptable. Donate!

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Martin N. wrote:

Ah, the righteous outrage of a keyboard warrior whose only contribution to environmental concerns is.....righteous outrage.

Go fuck yourself you asshole. Just because I post here does not mean I do nothing, just because my views are not neoliberal doesn't mean I do nothing.

You support the petroligarchy's right to run our planet. That makes you a fascist wannabe not a global saviour.

Martin N.

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Martin N. wrote:

Uh, no.

Ah, the righteous outrage of a keyboard warrior whose only contribution to environmental concerns is.....righteous outrage.

Go fuck yourself you asshole. Just because I post here does not mean I do nothing, just because my views are not neoliberal doesn't mean I do nothing.

You support the petroligarchy's right to run our planet. That makes you a fascist wannabe not a global saviour.

Uh, no. I support our democratic institutions and their ability to fund government programs. I do not support lawbreakers who consider their own opinions reason enough to break laws they do not agree with : anarchy.

Perhaps you can do something about the empty rabble kitty? That will really be 'doing something'. Thank you in advance and peace be unto you, angry old white guy.

Martin N.

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Martin N. wrote:

Uh, no.

Ah, the righteous outrage of a keyboard warrior whose only contribution to environmental concerns is.....righteous outrage.

Go fuck yourself you asshole. Just because I post here does not mean I do nothing, just because my views are not neoliberal doesn't mean I do nothing.

You support the petroligarchy's right to run our planet. That makes you a fascist wannabe not a global saviour.

Uh, no. I support our democratic institutions and their ability to fund government programs. I do not support lawbreakers who consider their own opinions reason enough to break laws they do not agree with : anarchy.

Perhaps you can do something about the empty rabble kitty? That will really be 'doing something'. Thank you in advance and peace be unto you, angry old white guy.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

I love babble it is such a great place to have a  dialogue which develops and expands progressive thought. Thank you for pointing out to me that anarchy is the problem and our "democracy" led by our petroligarchy is the answer.

I know you love to troll here but I love to call right wing trolls assholes so I guess we are even.

Martin N.

Everything outside of the orthodoxy preached here is considered 'trolling'. I ask awkward questions, sure, but that doesnt make me a troll. Its just that I'm interested in solutions, not banging on about the scope of the problem and the associated blame game.

I love babble too. I read much more than comment but have a lot of questions that are never answered. I am pleased to contribute and hope your grocery cart is soon overflowing with donations to convert into cash for rabble. No bottle left behind!

quizzical

why would anyone here know what caused this?

what wild question.

did you ask somewhere here why the Irving oil refinery blew up too?

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

B.C. grants fracking company free pass to build illegal dams

In a decision without precedent in its 25 years of existence, British Columbia’s Environmental Assessment Office has told Progress Energy that two massive unauthorized dams that it built will not have to undergo environmental assessments.

The decision comes after the company made an audacious request to the Environmental Assessment Office to have the two dams declared retroactively exempt from review — a request that was quietly granted by the province’s self-described neutral environmental regulator on July 17.

The exemption means Progress Energy is spared having the controversial dams subject to costly, public and potentially embarrassing reviews. The dams are described as “illegal works” in documents released by the Environmental Assessment Office in response to a Freedom of Information request from the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (CCPA).

The office’s decision is the latest development in a saga that came to light in May 2017, when the CCPA first reported on the existence of “dozens” of unlicensed dams. Many of the dams had been built by Progress Energy Canada Ltd., the Calgary-based subsidiary of Malaysian state-owned petro giant Petronas, a major player in B.C.’s fracking industry.

The office’s decision is the latest development in a saga that came to light in May 2017, when the CCPA first reported on the existence of “dozens” of unlicensed dams. Many of the dams had been built by Progress Energy Canada Ltd., the Calgary-based subsidiary of Malaysian state-owned petro giant Petronas, a major player in B.C.’s fracking industry.

Had the Environmental Assessment Office rejected Progress’s request, the company would almost certainly have faced questions about the numerous other dams that it built without permits and that were later found to have serious structural problems.

Full environmental assessments would also have likely shone a critical light on how B.C.’s energy industry regulator, the Oil and Gas Commission, allowed all the dams to be built in the first place.

Exemption ‘fuels public distrust’

Green Party MLA Sonia Furstenau says the Environmental Assessment Office’s decision to grant Progress’s extraordinary request fuels public distrust of the relationship between government and the powerful industries it regulates.

“Progress Energy being granted retroactive exemption is an example of how trust gets eroded,” Furstenau said. “People want to see companies and industry being held to account and to see rules being followed and enforced.”

“We have a long way to go to resolve this,” Furstenau said, adding:

“A revised EA [environmental assessment process] will help, reform of professional reliance will help, but we also need enforcement and monitoring, and we need far more transparency and accountability.”

In granting the exemptions — albeit with some conditions attached — the Environmental Assessment Office partially closes the file on one of the most extraordinary applications ever brought before it.

Martin N.

The term 'dams' is inaccurate. A better term is ponds, water storage ponds - mostly for recycling frac water but also for collecting runoff water. What they are not is structures built to block existing waterways.

Progress has built some sketchy structures that their engineers say are safe but have definitely been constructed to save a buck and without best practices in mind. The adage that "Its easier to ask for forgiveness than permission comes to mind".

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Avoiding the “F” word: How “natural” is Liquefied Natural Gas (LNG)?

In October, the B.C. government celebrated a decision by private-sector investors to proceed with LNG Canada, a $40 billion infrastructure project in Kitimat to export “natural” gas. Yet somehow much of the media coverage neglects to mention that this gas is extracted by hydraulic fracturing, or fracking, which is now the primary method for natural gas production in Canada. Why are so many media and government announcements studiously avoiding the “F” word?

There is nothing natural about fracking, which involves drilling a shaft up to four kilometres down into rock, then several more horizontally for up to three more kilometres. Large amounts of water, sand and chemicals are injected under high pressure into the rock, cracking and fissuring it to release gas deposits. During its lifetime, each fracking well consumes more than 90 million litres of clean water - the volume of 36 Olympic-size swimming pools. In fact, in parts of the United States drinking-water wells have dried up due to withdrawals for fracking....

Margaret Mcgregor, MD, CCFP, MHSc

Member of the Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment

Melissa Lem, MD, CCFP, FCFP

Board Member, Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment

Dr Courtney Howard, MD, CCFP-EM

Emergency Physician, Yellowknife, NT

President, Canadian Association of Physicians for the Environment

First Author on the Lancet Countdown 2017 Report: Briefing for Canadian Policymakers

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

The 2017 Report of the Lancet Countdown

The Lancet Countdown's 2017 report tracks 40 indicators across five areas, arriving at three key conclusions:

  • The human symptoms of climate change are unequivocal and potentially irreversible`
  • The delayed response to climate change over the past 25 years has jeopardised human life and livelihoods.
  • The past 5 years have seen an accelerated response, and in 2017 momentum is building across a number of sectors; the direction of travel is set, with clear and unprecedented opportunities for public health.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

The problem with exempting major projects from environmental assessment

When a public regulator repeatedly makes major decisions that favour corporate interests — quietly and behind closed doors — we have a problem.

British Columbia’s Environmental Assessment Office bills itself as a “neutral” provincial agency.

But there is evidence that this is not the case, and that B.C. Environment Minister George Heyman needs to make serious reforms — beyond what was recently announced in his revitalization of the province’s environmental assessment law.

On numerous occasions under B.C.’s environmental assessment regime, corporations close to the government have received favourable rulings from the regulator.

Citizens may conclude that the Environmental Assessment Office is captured by the very companies it regulates — companies that have, in some cases, made handsome political donations to British Columbia’s two major political parties.

quote:

Those rulings involved not one, not two, but three gas plants that Encana proposed to build near the community of Dawson Creek. One of them was the largest of its kind built in Western Canada in the past 30 years.

To be clear, none of these were minor facilities.

They all qualified as “major” projects under the Environmental Assessment Act’s regulations, and therefore should have been “reviewable.”

In each case, Encana asked the Environmental Assessment Office to exempt the gas plants from lengthy environmental assessments that would have required public notification and consultation.

And in each case, the office granted the company’s request without first notifying the public.

The company was thus spared the expense of having its projects subject to more transparent public environmental screenings.

quote:

This is a problem for people concerned with a lack of transparency and public input into major projects.

The Environmental Assessment Act grants the office powers to exempt reviewable projects from assessments. When and how such calls are made, however, is often completely shielded from public scrutiny until after the fact.

That’s what happened in the three Encana cases. And that is precisely what Environment Minister Heyman should fix if his revitalization efforts are to have a lasting, positive impact.

First Nation leaders and prominent environmental lawyers all recently told Heyman and/or key officials in his ministry that the assessment office’s powers to exempt major projects should be scrapped.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

After Quakes, Frackers Ordered to Halt Operations near Fort St. John

B.C.’s Oil and Gas Commission says earthquakes that rattled residents of Fort St. John and shook the Site C dam construction site last week were likely caused by fracking or salt water disposal wells operated by Canadian Natural Resources Ltd (CNRL).*

The commission has ordered a 30-day halt to all hydraulic fracturing in a densely drilled region 20 kilometres south of Fort St John.

“This will provide the Commission with sufficient time to conduct a thorough investigation,” said an OGC bulletin. “CNRL’s operations may not continue without the written consent of the Commission,” it added.

On Nov. 30 the industry, which has already changed seismic patterns in the region, triggered three quakes ranging from 3.4 to 4.5 magnitude at three different sites south of Fort St. John.

CNRL, Canada’s largest methane producer, leases more than a million hectares in northeastern B.C. It operates 10 large pads from which it drills and fracks multiple horizontal wells.

The company’s website has released no information on the events.

Local residents described the tremor as a major event felt more than 30 kilometres from Fort St. John.

Liam Strasky, a 21-year-old farmer and carpenter, told The Tyee he was at home in Farmington, about 40 km southeast of Fort St. John, playing Xbox with a friend on the evening of Nov. 30.

“All of a sudden we heard a bang and the house shook violently for five to six seconds,” said Strasky. “We could tell it was a seismic event.”

Twenty to 40 minutes later there was an aftershock, he said. “There were no vertical movements. It just shook the house back and forth a few times.”

Strasky said tremors triggered by the fracking industry also shook the farm house last April and left a crack in the basement

At the time Encana, a major fracker in the re-gion, said it was aware that its operations were linked to “recent examples of anomalous induced seismicity” and “we appreciate this has caused concern.”

The Structural Engineers Association of BC reports that quakes above magnitude 5.0 can cause extensive damage.

quote:

BC Hydro officials have had concerns since at least 2009 that earthquakes triggered by fracking are a potential risk to its Peace River dams.

Pages