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NorthReport

Another way landlords jack up big increases in the rent is when someone vacates their apartment landlords are free to raise the rent to whatever they want as the new tenant has no idea what the previous tenant paid. There should be a registry showing the tental amount for each rental unit in BC to stop this getting around the rent controls by the landlords. 

North Vancouver MLA Ma warns of rental hikes that flout tenants’ rights

http://www.nsnews.com/news/north-vancouver-mla-ma-warns-of-rental-hikes-...

NorthReport

I saw a statistic recently that showed one in five West Vancouverites are low income - what does low income actually mean: owning a multi-million dollar property but showing little or no income? 

NorthReport

Let's stop with the nonsense here about restaurants not be able to find staff in BC. Just pay them a decent and liveable wage.

JKR

NorthReport wrote:

Another way landlords jack up big increases in the rent is when someone vacates their apartment landlords are free to raise the rent to whatever they want as the new tenant has no idea what the previous tenant paid. There should be a registry showing the tental amount for each rental unit in BC to stop this getting around the rent controls by the landlords. 

North Vancouver MLA Ma warns of rental hikes that flout tenants’ rights

http://www.nsnews.com/news/north-vancouver-mla-ma-warns-of-rental-hikes-...

Rent controls by themselves are an ineffective way of creating affordable housing. When rent controls force landlords to rent their properties far below their market value, landlords just build condos instead of rental units. This in turn creates shortages of market rental units which just drives up the going price of rental units even more. So rent controls help people who already live in rental units and want to stay in their rental units for the rest of their lives but they hurt people who are want to move into rental units. 

Governments have never been able to successfully ignore the law of supply and demand. To create affordable housing the government will have to, in some combination, increase the supply of housing and decrease the demand for it.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Another way landlords jack up big increases in the rent is when someone vacates their apartment landlords are free to raise the rent to whatever they want as the new tenant has no idea what the previous tenant paid. There should be a registry showing the tental amount for each rental unit in BC to stop this getting around the rent controls by the landlords.

Who cares?  When you view a rental property, shouldn't you be primarily concerned with whether or not you believe the property represents a reasonable value?  In other words, do you want to pay the listed rent, or not?  What it once rented for is immaterial.

And as I've said before, when a rental unit is vacant, it's no different from a brand-new rental unit in the sense that the owner can ask whatever s/he wants, in the hope that someone will consider that a reasonable value.  If nobody does, the rent will surely come down.  Rent control exists to ensure that someone WHO IS ALREADY LIVING IN A UNIT will not see a sudden 150% increase in their rent, not so that someone looking to rent a vacant unit will only need to pay whatever someone else paid for it.

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Governments have never been able to successfully ignore the law of supply and demand.

Which is why these discussions are nearly always about Vancouver and Toronto.  Nobody seems to be paying $2000/month for a bachelor apartment in Kapuskasing.

JKR

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Quote:
Governments have never been able to successfully ignore the law of supply and demand.

Which is why these discussions are nearly always about Vancouver and Toronto.  Nobody seems to be paying $2000/month for a bachelor apartment in Kapuskasing.

I think these discussions are pressing since approximately 9 million people live in the metropolitan areas of Vancouver and Toronto. Here in Vancouver average 1 bedrooms are now going for $2000!!

JKR

Here in Vancouver dilapatated tiny unattached homes are going for $2 million so very many home owners are benefitting greatly from the general unaffordability and this is a major reason why it is difficult to deal with this issue. Many people here in Vancouver have basically won the lottery and will be retiring elsewhere very comfortably. They do not want to see the value of their multi-million dollar homes reduced.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Here in Vancouver average 1 bedrooms are now going for $2000!!

What about Kapuskasing?  What are they going for there?

Quote:
Many people here in Vancouver have basically won the lottery and will be retiring elsewhere very comfortably. They do not want to see the value of their multi-million dollar homes reduced.

Well, I suppose if they bought a "tiny, dilapidated" home back in the day when nobody cared, they probably sort of DID win the lottery.  But, so?  Some kid who spent a dime on a pack of hockey cards and got a Wayne Gretzky rookie card along with his gum also lucked out.  But, so?

JKR

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Quote:
Here in Vancouver average 1 bedrooms are now going for $2000!!

What about Kapuskasing?  What are they going for there?

https://www.kijiji.ca/v-2-bedroom-apartments-condos/kapuskasing/1-bed-50...

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Freshly updated 1 & 2 bedroom apartments for rent in Smooth Rock Falls 1 bed-$500 plus hydro and 2 bed-$575 plus hydro. Limited time offer. Sign 1 year lease and get 3rd month free!

JKR

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Quote:
Many people here in Vancouver have basically won the lottery and will be retiring elsewhere very comfortably. They do not want to see the value of their multi-million dollar homes reduced.

Well, I suppose if they bought a "tiny, dilapidated" home back in the day when nobody cared, they probably sort of DID win the lottery.  But, so?  Some kid who spent a dime on a pack of hockey cards and got a Wayne Gretzky rookie card along with his gum also lucked out.  But, so?

Many people here in Vancouver want an affordable city for its current and future citizens. People don't need a Gretzky rookie card but they do require adequate shelter.

NorthReport

So is it a done deal that Robertson will be running for the federal Liberals next election - maybe in Vancouver Centre?

Even with council by-election victory, it's far too early for the NPA to crack open the Champagne

 

Much of the media coverage has focused on the woes of Mayor Gregor Robertson and Vision Vancouver, even though it elected exactly the same number of politicians as the NPA.

The reality is the results still showed deep mistrust for both Vision Vancouver and the NPA.

Bremner, a public-relations executive, only captured 27.83 percent of the council votes. He collected just 13,372 votes, which was lower than 16 of the 19 school board candidates.

Three NPA school board candidates, including former trustee Christopher Richardson, were defeated.

Two of them received fewer votes than the lowest-ranking Vision Vancouver candidate and one was even below the only COPE candidate.

This hardly ranks as a major success, given the effort that the NPA exerted in painting its Vision school-board opponents as bullies.

NPA fared better in the past

The last time the NPA had only two trustees on the Vancouver school board was after the Vision Vancouver landslide of 2008.

In the 2011 and 2014 elections, the NPA elected more trustees.

So while the NPA might feel it's on the rebound with four members on Vancouver city council, the foundation remains weak.

Part of the problem for the NPA has been that its base on the West Side of Vancouver is producing a smaller percentage of the overall votes as it did in the party's heyday of the late 1980s and 1990s.

The rising number of landed immigrants (who can't vote) and the lack of densification in the NPA's prime areas, like Southlands, Dunbar, and Shaughnessy, have given the party a disadvantage in general elections.

In recent years, there's been greater densification on the East Side and, to a lesser extent, in the West End. This adds up to a growing number of homeowners in Grandview-Woodland, Kensington-Cedar Cottage, Hastings-Sunrise, and other East Side neighbourhoods where many voters tend to dislike the NPA.

It's a simple formula: more citizen-residents add up to more votes.

Cooperation could stymie NPA

While it's clear from yesterday's by-election that voters' love affair with Mayor Gregor Robertson and Vision Vancouver is fading, it remains unclear where their support may go in the 2018 general election.

This time around, many voted for independent Jean Swanson, Green candidate Pete Fry, and OneCity's Judy Graves. But it's conceivable that they may vote more strategically next time to prevent the NPA from seizing power.

If Vision Vancouver, for example, were to run a short slate of council candidates, perhaps the Greens and OneCity would be amenable to also running short slates so as to concentrate their vote. 

Five Vision candidates, three Greens, and two OneCity council candidates, for instance, would likely be enough to keep the NPA from taking control of council, which has 11 members including the mayor.

The three parties could all endorse the Vision mayoral candidate—whether that's Robertson, Andrea Reimer, or Raymond Louie—as being preferable to anyone running for the NPA.

The Greens might really get behind a Reimer mayoral bid, given that she was first elected as a Green trustee, if she ran as a unity candidate rather than having the name "Vision Vancouver" after her name.

The NPA might then be kept from gaining a majority even if Jean Swanson were to run as an independent, Mary Jean Dunsdon ran as the marijuana candidate, and COPE ran a slate of candidates.

Swanson would likely get elected under this scenario, but she would be loath to support the aims of NPA politicians, particularly if Reimer took a left turn.

As things appear today, the only way the NPA can get a large number of council candidates elected is if there's sufficient vote splitting. This was the lesson of the 2017 council by-election.

And you can be sure that the Vision, Green, and OneCity brain trusts will learn from this experience and avoid leaving themselves vulnerable in the same way in 2018.

https://www.straight.com/news/981546/even-council-election-victory-its-f...

progressive17 progressive17's picture

Only social housing can drive down commercial rents.

Basement Dweller

JKR wrote:

Here in Vancouver dilapatated tiny unattached homes are going for $2 million so very many home owners are benefitting greatly from the general unaffordability and this is a major reason why it is difficult to deal with this issue. Many people here in Vancouver have basically won the lottery and will be retiring elsewhere very comfortably. They do not want to see the value of their multi-million dollar homes reduced.

If they all - or just a significant percent of them - tried to cash in their lottery tickets at once, the market will collapse. They believe they've won the lottery, but very few will be in a scenario where they have millions of dollars in their bank account. The system just doesn't work like that.

JKR

Basement Dweller wrote:

JKR wrote:

Here in Vancouver dilapatated tiny unattached homes are going for $2 million so very many home owners are benefitting greatly from the general unaffordability and this is a major reason why it is difficult to deal with this issue. Many people here in Vancouver have basically won the lottery and will be retiring elsewhere very comfortably. They do not want to see the value of their multi-million dollar homes reduced.

If they all - or just a significant percent of them - tried to cash in their lottery tickets at once, the market will collapse. They believe they've won the lottery, but very few will be in a scenario where they have millions of dollars in their bank account. The system just doesn't work like that.

So homes in Vancouver aren't being sold for millions of dollars but they are just being bought for millions of dollars?

Basement Dweller

We aren't in that scenario yet, but the market is already weakening for multi-million dollar homes. There's only so many people who can buy, and interest rates increases (along with new mortgage rules) are just beginning. People selling those homes now, and pocketing the cash, are part of the very few.

JKR

Rental cost of one-bedroom apartment in Vancouver jumps to $2,120; Vancouver Sun; October 16, 2017.

http://vancouversun.com/news/local-news/rental-cost-of-one-bedroom-apart...

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A one-bedroom apartment in Vancouver now goes for the median asking price of about $2,120, a five-per-cent jump from last month and a 15.8-per-cent jump over October 2016. Meanwhile, a two-bedroom apartment is $3,200 a month, a 1.3-per-cent increase from September and a 14.3-per-cent increase from October last year.

 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Many people here in Vancouver want an affordable city for its current and future citizens.

But how specifically shall they make that happen?  I just mean that the cost of houses and rentals is surely the product of a high demand for them, just like in Toronto to a lesser degree.  What do you do when everyone seems to want to live in two cities?

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People don't need a Gretzky rookie card but they do require adequate shelter.

Everyone needs a roof over their head.  But why must it be in Vancouver or Toronto?  I'm not saying that because I think either would be better off being a city of millionaires.   I'm just not sure how any level of government is supposed to effectively fight (and beat) the law of supply and demand. 

NorthReport

Unfortunately the system has been corrupted

Theoretically governments are there to fix these issues but in reality they just represent the rich and powerful - those that profit from $2000 a month rent

All sorts of techniques can be used such as the taxation system as money talks if you make it lucrative enough people will live elsewhere 

NorthReport
NorthReport
Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
All sorts of techniques can be used such as the taxation system as money talks if you make it lucrative enough people will live elsewhere

I guess that's kind of my question.  Why don't people want to live elsewhere now?

JKR

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Everyone needs a roof over their head.  But why must it be in Vancouver or Toronto?  I'm not saying that because I think either would be better off being a city of millionaires.   I'm just not sure how any level of government is supposed to effectively fight (and beat) the law of supply and demand. 

A healthy city cannot just be for millionaires so Vancouver and Toronto will have to come up with solutions like they have in places like Vienna, Hong Kong, New York, Paris, London, and Singapore. 

https://thetyee.ca/News/2017/05/17/Imagine-Vancouver-Quality-Housing/

Historically governments have been able to manage supply and demand in different markets. Governments can impose a tax on a service or product to reduce its demand and thus reduce its price. Governments can also spend their revenues to increase supply of a service or a product which will also reduce its price. Governments can also change regulations of a product to make it cheaper to produce which reduces its price. So in the case of housing, governments can reduce the price of housing by imposing a tax on housing, by building housing, including social housing, and by changing zoning laws. Governments can also give tax credits to builders to build rental housing. 

The zoning laws in Vancouver have played a significant part in reducing supply and increasing prices. If demand keeps increasing it does seem inevitable that Vancouver will have to change its zoning laws to allow for greater density.

JKR

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Quote:
All sorts of techniques can be used such as the taxation system as money talks if you make it lucrative enough people will live elsewhere

I guess that's kind of my question.  Why don't people want to live elsewhere now?

People want to live where the jobs are. For instance here in Vancouver there are many very good jobs near places like UBC and the Vancouver General Hospital.

NorthReport

Why do we need mobility pricing - just increase the taxes on the gas at the pumps, so you pay for what you use, eh!

North Vancouver MLA calls for North Shore SkyTrain

http://www.nsnews.com/news/north-vancouver-mla-calls-for-north-shore-sky...

NorthReport

Devon Rowcliffe shared a link.

16 October at 15:46

Bill Tieleman shows why first-past-the-post is a flawed voting system: it causes vote-splitting and bullies voters into strategic voting. Less than 30% of Vancouver voters wanted this right-wing councillor candidate elected, yet he won.

Crowded Field on Left Could Hand Wins to NPA Saturday | The Tyee

Vision, Greens, COPE, One City set to split vote, giving NPA edge in school board, council races.

THETYEE.CA

 

NorthReport
epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Proof of concept: An insurgent left can achieve electoral success — even in Canada

Vancouver’s political revolution has begun. In less than three months a dynamic movement coalesced around Jean Swanson, an incorruptible stalwart of the city’s left who was persuaded to run as an independent in a civic by-election.

With no infrastructure, very little support from organized labour, and without even a campaign manager, Swanson pulled off a strong second place showing in the Oct. 14 election. Her campaign was propelled by a remarkable ad hoc grassroots coalition that saw hundreds of volunteers energetically campaigning for policies like a Rent Freeze and a Mansion Tax. Swanson’s campaign was derided by centre-left opponents as “class warfare,” but it turned out to be just the approach to politics needed in the midst of Vancouver’s out-of-control affordability emergency.....

NorthReport

 

We need a fresh face.

I support Carrie Bercic for Chair

Janet Fraser not yet a shoo-in as next Vancouver school board chair

Carrie Bercic with OneCity is the ninth trustee in the board, and she earlier told the Straight that she will support for chair the “most progressive voice that will put their name forward”. 

https://www.straight.com/news/985686/janet-fraser-not-yet-shoo-next-vanc...

NorthReport

Maybe Patti Bacchus will  be Vision Vancouver's mayoralty candidate  in next year's Vancouver Council elections

Patti Bacchus calls on Chilliwack trustee to resign after he slams allowing kids to change their gender

https://www.straight.com/life/985466/patti-bacchus-calls-chilliwack-trus...

NorthReport

Is it bye, bye Andrea Reimer and hello Patti Bacchus for Vision?

Andrea Reimer: I will not be seeking reelection in 2018

https://www.straight.com/news/986251/andrea-reimer-i-will-not-be-seeking...

NorthReport

With Coun. Andrea Reimer leaving, why not just shut down Vision Vancouver?

https://www.straight.com/news/986281/coun-andrea-reimer-leaving-why-not-...

NorthReport

Patti Bacchus: The Vancouver school board's new chair is a big win for Green party brand

https://www.straight.com/news/990521/patti-bacchus-vancouver-school-boar...

NorthReport

BC Ferries are shut down due to strong winds 

NorthReport

Patti Bacchus: Marpole housing opponents need schooling

https://www.straight.com/news/993496/patti-bacchus-marpole-housing-oppon...

NorthReport

 

Unless you are part of the 1% or already own a house you are totally screwed

Jobs are going begging now, many are not being filled, as workers cannot afford to live here any more.

Vancouver condo rush sparks local and foreign flipping frenzy

https://www.reuters.com/article/canada-housing-vancouver/vancouver-condo...

NorthReport

George Affleck who was supposed to be NPA Right-wing mayoralty candidate in 2018, is quitting municipal politics is it because he doesn’t think the NPA has a future or is there some kind of scandal about to released to the public

NorthReport
NorthReport

In Vancouver, 50% of trips are by foot, bike, or transit. This video shows how they did it.

Step one: Start decades ago.

https://www.vox.com/science-and-health/2016/12/9/13897078/walkable-vanco...

NorthReport
NorthReport
NorthReport
NorthReport
NorthReport

 Vancouver School Board menorah mistake leads to a Christmas sorry

 

 

null

The Vancouver School Board (VSB) made international headlines this week over a holiday-decoration dispute after its top leaders’ fumbled response made matters worse, not better.

It’s a shame, because the last time the VSB made international news was in 2014 when I was interviewed on the BBC and the Al Jazeera news networks about the VSB’s ground-breaking, progressive, and inclusive sexual-orientation and gender-identity policy. This time, unfortunately, it was for allowing Christmas trees and wreaths in an elementary school while refusing to let two 11-year-olds bring in menorahs or other Hanukkah decorations.

I was stunned by such a blatant violation of the VSB policy, which states that the board “is committed to developing and supporting an environment that affirms, respects, reflects, and celebrates the racial, ethno-cultural, and religious diversity of our society”.

As a former VSB chair and spokesperson, I expected a swift public response apologizing for the mistake, including a commitment to enforce board policy, an assurance that it wouldn’t happen again, and praise and thanks for the two students who spoke out on the issue.  

Grade 6 students deserve an A for leadership; VSB gets a fail

Those students—Maya Sontz and Rebecca Weinberg—both deserve an A for leadership, while the VSB administrators and board get a failing grade for a response that seemed to make the offense worse, not better, for several distressing days.

In case you haven’t been following the saga of how General Gordon elementary on Vancouver’s West Side became an international news story for all the wrong reasons, here’s what played out last week.

The school was decorated with Christmas trees, wreaths, and other Christmas-themed decorations. A winter concert was scheduled, featuring holiday songs about Santa and a reindeer named Rudolph. Maya and Rebecca asked if they could bring in some Hanukkah-themed decorations, and Maya’s mom asked the school principal to include some Hanukkah songs during the school concert, which was to take place duringHanukkah.

The principal said “No.”

“I would really like to feel represented”

I got wind of this via a CTV news report in which Rebecca said, "I have nothing against Christmas. I just think they should add more Hanukkah and other religions. I would really like to feel represented."

The ridiculous rationale for turning down the girls’ perfectly reasonable request, according to news coverage, was that the principal declared Christmas trees and other Christmas-themed decorations and songs to be cultural, while Hanukkah-themed decorations and songs were religious, and thus not allowed under the VSB policy.

I know. Bizarre and, quite frankly, ignorant and shocking.

People make some really bad judgement calls. Even school principals. I get that. That’s when someone up the school board food chain steps in and shows leadership and deals with it promptly and properly. Except this time, they didn’t.

Instead of the board chair, Janet Fraser, stepping in immediately with the response I outlined above, which is what I would’ve done, she sent VSB associate superintendent Nancy Brennan to respond to CTV. Associate superintendents are senior managers who are well paid to be leaders with, you know, good judgement.

Given the opportunity to apologize and assure the public that VSB policy would be upheld and the Gordon mistake would not be repeated, Brennan doubled down on the principal’s decision, telling CTV: “How individual schools treat cultural and religious symbols is ultimately up to them.

"I'm no expert in terms of cultural symbols and representations, so I wouldn't want to be making those decisions at the district level for schools in terms of what's appropriate or not," Brennan—one of the district’s highest-paid senior officials—added.

Wrong. Completely wrong. It is senior managers’ job to ensure that board policies are followed at the school level. The board makes policies to ensure that it is not left up to individuals at the school level to make ignorant decisions like allowing Christmas decorations while excluding Hanukkah ones. And for the love of Christmas and/or Hanukkah, you don’t need to be an expert to know what a Christmas tree represents.

It didn’t end there, unfortunately. With public outrage growing and Facebook groups buzzing, the VSB put out a mealy-mouthed December 8 statement quoting John Lewis, the interim superintendent, who is Brennan’s boss. He didn’t do much better. Neither did board chair Janet Fraser, who chimed in and brushed the matter off as “an unfortunate misunderstanding”. Neither apologized and neither made it clear that Hanukkah and decorations would be welcome alongside the Christmas ones.

Parents and the public were unimpressed, to say the least

The Centre for Israel and Jewish Affairs (CIJA) weighed in on December 9 with a widely shared and commented-on Facebook post saying: “On Thursday evening, we were troubled to learn that a Vancouver school had not allowed Hanukkah decorations and songs in neither the school nor the school's Christmas concert. We are incredibly proud of the two grade six students who voiced their objections and—when unsuccessful at the school level—took their efforts public.

“CIJA immediately contacted the Vancouver School Board and provincial government officials to clarify their positions and express our concerns. These officials confirmed that diversity and inclusion are enshrined in their policies.

“However, policies are meaningless if they are not implemented,” the CIJA statement added. “We continue to work with officials to seek a resolution. We are hopeful this can be achieved within the next few days.”

On Sunday (December 10), Fraser gave it another try and issued a wordy statement that finally got around to apologizing by the third paragraph: “The VBE sincerely regrets any practices at General Gordon Elementary that have negatively impacted a sense of inclusion and representation for students and parents within our school community. As Chairperson, I apologize on behalf of the Board to the students and their families who did not feel welcomed and included at their school. We acknowledge that in the interpretation and implementation of our policies, there has been confusion about what is permitted as part of upcoming winter celebrations, including Hanukkah.”

Better, but not soon enough to prevent the whole sorry story making headlines halfway around the world, giving the VSB a black eye that could have been prevented by some timely common sense from the VSB leadership ranks.

That wasn’t the end of it. On Tuesday (December 12) of this week, Fraser issued another wordy and awkward statement that finally got around to apologizing to Rebecca and Maya and giving them the thanks they should have had immediately after going public.

Wrong message from the VSB

This is all also a shame, because during the eight years I served on the board, I had many conversations with Jewish parents and those from other faiths who struggled with the decision about sending their kids to public schools. Many supported public education in principle but were concerned that their kids would feel excluded because of their cultural and religious practices. I’d assure them VSB schools embraced and practised religious and cultural inclusion and that strong policies were in place to ensure and guarantee that.

I was proud—and still am—of the VSB’s reputation as a leader in progressive policy and for its diverse, inclusive schools. I believed that if an individual employee failed to abide by board policies, that would quickly be addressed and resolved and students and parents would feel safe knowing they wouldn’t have to fight battles like this on their own. Now I’m not so sure. An incident like this wouldn’t have been handled so poorly in my day at the VSB, and I hope it doesn’t again, but the multilevel missteps don’t inspire confidence in the current leadership.

 

 

https://www.straight.com/news/1008466/patti-bacchus-vancouver-school-boa...

Basement Dweller

Flippers flop: another feel-good story from BC. Expect more of these in the New Year. :)

https://thinkpol.ca/2017/12/18/flipper-sues-buyer-lost-half-million-selling-waterfront-property-loss/

NorthReport

 

How much real estate do foreigner investors really own? Statscan got it wrong

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/how-much-real-estate-do-foreigne...

NorthReport

We expect more from our governments that their current housing or rather lack of current housing policy results. Their playing politics is resulting in way too many Canadians undergoing serious inabilities to acquire shelter in a Northern country climate.

http://vancouversun.com/opinion/columnists/douglas-todd-why-most-suburban-metro-vancouver-politicians-are-mum-on-foreign-ownership

NorthReport
NorthReport

 

If you have a chance to get out to a flic in the Vancouver area I recommend the VIFF 

https://www.straight.com/movies/1142806/finding-big-country-seeks-missing-part-vancouver-history

NorthReport
epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

The Vancouver election is over, but the fight for the City We Need continues

When Jean Swanson was elected to Vancouver City Council on October 20, some activists in the City We Need campaign for renters’ rights said they felt as if ‘we (in the movement) had all won.. This rings true because Jean and the members of the COPE/City We Need campaign realize that it is only as part of an ongoing movement that a city councilor can make real change. So it’s not a surprise that on November 9, less than three weeks after the election, Jean was one of the speakers at the ‘Rally to Ban Renovictions’ organized by the Vancouver Tenants Union (VTU). There tenants of Berkeley Tower told their stories of how they were being evicted by their landlord so that renovations could be done, providing a pretext for vastly inflating rents. Swanson was clear in condemning “predatory landlords…who are destroying communities to build luxury commodities.”

Unlike the mainstream political parties, COPE hasn't quit just because the election is over. The City We Need campaign will continue to build the movement we need. Swanson’s two upcoming motions, to ban renovictions and to amend the presently fairly toothless Tenant Relocation and Protection Policy so that it better protects tenants, will both be heard in council next week....

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