Atlantic Canada Polls - started June 8, 2012

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NorthReport
Atlantic Canada Polls - started June 8, 2012

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NorthReport

More good news for the NDP - this time in N & L

 

PCs - 49%, down 5%

NDP - 33%, up 5%, and all at the expense of the PCs.

Libs - 18%, flatlined

NDP eclipsing Liberals for 2nd position, says pollster

New Democrats say poll results show party on right track

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/story/2012/06/07/nl-...

KenS

And the good news just keeps on coming

Voter support for Dexter, NDP government dropping: CRA poll

 

Corporate Research CEO Don Mills said the numbers seem to suggest the NDP and Dexter have paid a price for power rate increases, though the government doesn't control those, and cuts to the education budget.

"At some point, dissatisfaction leads to less voter support, and I think we've certainly seen a fairly significant drop in voter support for the NDP in the last quarter for sure," Mills said.

Also Thursday, a national Angus Reid online poll found Dexter had the lowest approval rating among Canadian premiers at 27 per cent. Brad Wall of Saskatchewan topped the list at 67 per cent.

Canseco said one factor working against Dexter is having to contend with two relatively strong opposition parties, while most other provinces only have one.

"That certainly plays a role," Canseco said. "That being said, his numbers are down 12 points in six months, which is definitely not good."

 

I dont know about the two relatively strong opposition parties. Yes, there are two parties that are neither dead nor close to death. But Its not like Ontario.


 

felixr

Darrell Dexter is in the middle of pulling a Bob Rae: alienating his base and losing favour with the centre.

At least unlike Bob Rae, Dexter will not have a record of fiscal disaster to contend with.

Team Darrell Dexter, if you are reading this, I have a Texan saying for you: "you gotta dance with them what brung you"

Don't alienate your base. Don't jettison your core supporters. If you don't have a base, you will get knocked over by the slightest breeze.

NorthReport

Yet the NDP are still polling in 1st place in NS

---------------------------------------------------

And here is more good news for the NDP, this time in PEI.

 

Party / Jun '12 / Feb '12 / GE '11 / Change

Libs / 47% / 50% / 51% / Down 4%

PCs / 26% / 33% / 40% / Down 14%

NDP / 18% / 11% / 3% / Up 15% - not too shabby and no leader!

NDP bolstered by jump in poll

 

http://www.theguardian.pe.ca/News/Local/2012-06-08/article-3003825/NDP-b...

NorthReport

NB

Party / May '12 / Feb '12

PC / 44% / 45%

Libs / 32% / 31%

NDP / 19% / 22% 

http://cra.ca/support-for-nb-pc-government-remains-steady/

Aristotleded24

felixr wrote:
Darrell Dexter is in the middle of pulling a Bob Rae: alienating his base and losing favour with the centre.

And pissing away all the hard work that Alexa McDonnough and Robert Chisholm put into building the NDP in the first place.

KenS

I'm not counting Dexter and company out. They aren't Bob Rae, by a long shot.

There is a patient, disciplined and methodical calculation to it all. And cynical of course. But we're talking now about what works, and cynical can work. Look at Steven Harper.

Which is not to say they will win out in the end, but there is a method... and it does work, whether or not it keeps working. It hepls when the alternatives are half-witted. With no election looming, people's disatisfaction bubbles up. Without an election, that is only loosely expressed in relation to the alternatives.

Convention time here. I wonder how many are there, and what the ratio is of numbers of base versus numbers employed by the government?

jerrym

 A CRA poll of 400 New Brunswick voters with a margin of error of ±4.9%, done between November 13 and December 1, 2012, found that the NDP fell from 24% to 19% since three months ago, while the Progressive Conservatives stayed at 38% and the Liberals went up to 38% and a tie with the PCs from 32%. 

"Presently 46 percent (compared with 47% in August 2012) of New Brunswick residents are either completely or mostly satisfied with the provincial government, while a similar number (49%, unchanged) are dissatisfied. ... Three in ten New Brunswick residents prefer David Alward for Premier (29%, compared with 33%), while Brian Gallant of the Liberal Party is preferred by approximately three in ten (29%, up from 18% for Interim Leader Victor Boudreau). Support for Dominic Cardy of the NDP stands at 11 percent (compared with 15%)." (http://cra.ca/support-for-nb-pc-government-remains-stable-liberal-party-...)

 

The selection of a permanent Liberal leader is the most likely cause of the spike in Liberal support.

 

Despite the recent decline in NDP support, the current 19% of voters favouring the NDP is still significantly higher than the 10.41% it obtained in the September 2010 election. (http://www.electionalmanac.com/ea/new-brunswick/)

 

 

jerrym

For a sample of 800 voters done by CRA in Nova Scotia with a margin of error of ± 3.5%, conducted from November 7 to November 30, 2012, the NDP government fell to 29% from 31%. However, Premier Darrell Dexter’s personal popularity has slightly improved to 26%, from 23% in August. The Liberals are unchanged at 41% while the Conservatives have climbed to 27% from 22%.

"Although NDP voter support has not increased this quarter, satisfaction with the provincial government has improved slightly. Presently, just over four in ten Nova Scotia residents are satisfied with the overall performance of the Dexter government (42%, up from 37% in August 2012). One-half of Nova Scotians are dissatisfied with the performance of the NDP Government (50%, compared with 54%), while seven percent (compared with 9%) do not offer a definite opinion."

http://cra.ca/ns-liberals-maintain-lead-in-voter-support-pc-party-making...

In the 2009 election, the NDP gained 45.26% compared to 27.22% for the Liberals and 24.52% for the  Progressive Conservatives. 

http://cra.ca/ns-liberals-maintain-lead-in-voter-support-pc-party-making...

 

jerrym

In a CRA Newfoundland and Labrador poll from November 13 to December 1, 2012 with a margin of error of ± 3.5%, the NDP has continued to hold onto to recent historically high level in support with 31% of voters choosing it compared to 33% in September and 28% in February (31% being within the margin of error of these previous results). This represents a significant climb from the already historically high 24.64% obtained in the October 2011 election. NDP leader Lorraine Michael is preferred for Premier by 29%, a statisical tie with her 31% in September.  Support for the Progressive Conservatives is up a statisically insignificant 1% for both the Conservatives (to 46%) and the Liberals (to 23%).

http://cra.ca/support-for-nl-pc-government-stable-remains-highest-in-atl...

http://www.electionalmanac.com/ea/newfoundland-labrador/

Sandy Dillon

NorthReport wrote:

NB

Party / May '12 / Feb '12

PC / 44% / 45%

Libs / 32% / 31%

NDP / 19% / 22% 

http://cra.ca/support-for-nb-pc-government-remains-steady/

WOW TALK ABOUT SLOW LEARNERS EH? The P.C.'s still ahead in N.B.?

KenS

I'm known to be no fan of Dexter and this government, but I'm puzzled by his personal numbers.

Leader numbers are in practice a mash of what people think of the Leader, and also strongly tend to express where the party itself is headed.

Looking around me, I cant account why Darrel would be going down, or that the NDP is headed for more trouble.

jerrym

While a CRA poll of Nova Scotian voters released on March 6th shows the three main parties' changes in popularity all within the 3.5% margin of error of the last CRA poll, the NDP is up 3% to 32% while the Liberals are down 2% to 39% and the PCs have dropped 3% to 24%. There is 5% support for the Greens. 

The Dexter government has a 40% satisfaction level and a 51% dissatisfaction level. Dexter's personal popularity has declined from 26% to 21%. Liberal leader popularity has also declined from 33% to 26% while the PC leader has increased from 17% to 20%. 

http://cra.ca/ns-liberals-maintain-lead-over-ndp-although-margin-declines/

David Young

I'd be interested in knowing from which parts of N.S. the polling firm called.

The economy around Halifax is set to expand tremendously once the shipbuilding contracts start.  That's where the majority of NDP seats are located, (16 seats of 23 within a one-hour drive of the two bridges).

It's the areas outside of metro Halifax where the Liberals have gained support, but with redistribution, there will be two new seats in the Halifax area, and 1 less seat overall (52 to 51 next election).

All the NDP has to do is keep the same number of seats around Halifax (or add some) plus as few of the more popular incumbants hold onto their rural seats, and the NDP can win another majority.

 

KenS

Dream on.

The chance for a majority is utterly gone.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

David Young wrote:

The economy around Halifax is set to expand tremendously once the shipbuilding contracts start.  That's where the majority of NDP seats are located, (16 seats of 23 within a one-hour drive of the two bridges).

The federal Conservative military procurement program is going to get people to vote for the NS NDP.  Is that really what you meant?

KenS

Not to mention that in 4-5 years when those jobs start coming on in more than a trickle, presuming they go ahead more or less on schedule despite the uncertainties.... after another 4-5 years those shipyard job numbers MIGHT catch up with the permanent shrinkage in numbers of teachers and other educational professionals.

[And despite the propaganda saying otherwise, those education job number shrinkages are far greater than the rate of student population shrinkage.]

Even the NDP's friends in the business boosters don't expect a "tremendous" expansion out of this, even if things go well.

Stockholm

Realistically, it seems very likely that NS is headed for another minority government after the next election. I guess the question is whether it ends up being the NDP or the Libs with more seats - and even if the NDP had a plurality of seats, would the Tories form a coalition with the second place Liberals to "stop socialism in its tracks"? Othersise, how long could a minority NDP government last with the PCs holding the balance of poweer?

David Young

Stockholm wrote:

Realistically, it seems very likely that NS is headed for another minority government after the next election. I guess the question is whether it ends up being the NDP or the Libs with more seats - and even if the NDP had a plurality of seats, would the Tories form a coalition with the second place Liberals to "stop socialism in its tracks"? Othersise, how long could a minority NDP government last with the PCs holding the balance of poweer?

That would depend, Stockholm, on how long it takes for the P.C.s to dump their leader, Jamie Baille, after the election.

He's not resonating with the voters, and should they do as bad (or worse) than they are now, it wouldn't be untill next year when they would pick a new leader (Peter Mackay?).

 

KenS

Even without dumping leaders, or the desire of many to do so, I think there is a very low likelihood of any kind of alliance between the Liberals and PCs to overpower an NDP plurality. It wouldn't be seen as legitimate. But more to the point, they dont have anything in common- certainly not a united front to get rid of the [not] dreaded socialists.

Against that there is the real fear the PCs would have of being pulverized after being a junior partner.

The same goes for NDP governing minority with the PCs holding the balance of power: unless something pretty dramatic changes, the PCs are going to be in fear of another election. Another page in how to govern Dexter can take from Harper- not nearly as vicious or ruthless [this is Nova Scotia]; nonetheless commonalities of how to wield power, and how to dominate the long games, regardless of what the horse race polls are saying at the moment.

The Dexter crowd is not quite as proficient as Harper at making sure all the ducks are lined up; but given the half-witted competition the NDP has historically faced, they dont have to be as good at it.

jerrym

The Newfoundland Progressive Conservatives have been caught manipulating the results of provincial polls when messages of Conservative MHA Paul Lane's BlackBerry were leaked. "In the messages, Lane urged supporters to vote, and also demonstrated how to get around the security features to vote multiple times to manipulate the result."

Newfoundland and Labrador Premier Kathy Dunderdale although admitting the PCs had done this, says it's not a big deal that her caucus and political staff attempt to influence the results of online opinion polls. Her response to a newspaper article on this was "Oh please. There's no story here. Do we participate in polls? You betcha. Who in Newfoundland doesn't? We're politicians. We have a perspective. We have to relay what that perspective is, and talk about that perspective to the people of the province." She compared this manipulation to voting in online polls for TV shows.

However, Lorraine Michael, the NDP leader, emphasized that the PCs' tactics were a blatant attempt at manipulation of the public: "I find it inappropriate actually, and I find it a manipulation".

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/newfoundland-labrador/story/2013/02/20/nl-...

 

Hunky_Monkey

Even with current polling numbers and a 7 point Liberal advantage, seat prediction by thehundredeight.com gives the Liberals only 24 seats to the NDP's 20 with the PC's at 7 seats.

If the trend continues and the gap closes, the NDP could win re-election with a tie or even a point or two behind... similar to Glen Clark in BC.

jerrym

As in PEI and Newfoundland, the NDP are growing in New Brunswick. The latest CRA poll from February 13 to March 8, 2013, with a ±4.9% margin of error shows NDP support increased to 26% from 19%. Support for both the PCs and the Liberals are down. The PCs fell from 38% to 32%, while the Liberals dropped to 35% from 38%, mirroring a pattern seen in Newfoundland. 

"David Alward’s personal popularity declined this quarter, with two in ten New Brunswick residents preferring Alward for Premier (21%, down from 29%). Meanwhile, Brian Gallant of the Liberal Party is preferred by one-quarter (26%, compared with 29%). Support for Dominic Cardy of the NDP stands at 15% (compared with 11%)."

http://cra.ca/voter-intentions-tighten-as-satisfaction-with-nb-pc-declines/

KenS

Are you saying/guessing that close to a tie COULD give the NDP the most seats? Or that the NDP most likely will get the most seats if it is around a tie for the popular vote?

Something like that- for some [structural?] reason they will probably get more seats than their popular vote would indicate?

jerrym

I think that the weakening of the Employment Insurance program is not only hurting the federal Cons in the Atlantic region but is damaging their PC cousins in these provinces and contributing to the recent growth of the NDP in the region. 

KenS

Dont think so.

The PEI PCs are imploding all on their own. They make people want to run from them.

Thay are the govt in NB. Nuff said, let alone what they do to encourage it.

The NS PCs seem to be trying to turn bland into an art form. They arent capable of offending anyone, or even of being associated with Harper.

KenS

But yes, Mulcair and the ascendance of the federal NDP would be helping in PEI and NB. Especially when people are just casting around for something else.

Stockholm

Any theory on why it is that in Nova Scotia the Liberals have been the only beneficiary from the NDP slide while the PCs are still a distant third? Its not like there aren't typically lots of NDP/PC switchers in Nova Scotia and the PCs were the government less than four years ago.

David Young

Stockholm wrote:

Any theory on why it is that in Nova Scotia the Liberals have been the only beneficiary from the NDP slide while the PCs are still a distant third? Its not like there aren't typically lots of NDP/PC switchers in Nova Scotia and the PCs were the government less than four years ago.

Jamie Baille is seen as a pure 'corporate' leader. who saw his main leadership candidate, Karen Casey, jump ship to the Liberals after the leadership contest.  Since the election, the P.C.s have lost by-elections to the NDP (Antigonish) and Liberals (Yarmouth) in addition to Casey's defection.  He's not connecting with rural voters, even though he was parachuted into a rural seat in a by-election.

Stephen McNeil has been Liberal leader since 2007, and represents a rural riding, so he is more familiar to non-urban voters.

But since the number of rural ridings is decreasing, and the Halifax-area ridings are increasing, the Liberals and P.C.s will be fighting each other over rural strength, while the NDP continues to have it's best support in the metro area.

 

 

KenS

I largely agree with David. One major caveat- that the NDP doesnt have the numerous Metro seats sewed up that have retiring incumbents. The Liberals are particularly on the move in Dartmouth. Let alone the NDP erosion in rural seats.

Stockholm wrote:

Its not like there aren't typically lots of NDP/PC switchers in Nova Scotia and the PCs were the government less than four years ago.

I dont really have any statistical backing for this, but I think that this traditional two-choice preference has become 'undefined' in Nova Scotia. Like maybe it still exists on paper, and people will answer that way if the question is abstract enough or an election is far enough away; but generally the 'switcher choice' isnt operative. So that when people who have voted NDP [last time at least] start drifting, they don't have much tendency to go back where they were.

In other words, if you poll people now for first and second choice- I think you'll find that for a whole lot of folks, one of those parties they have not voted for in the past.

KenS

It really seems like the long term trend is that one of the old parties in Nova Scotia at a time plays the sad sack loser role. It was the Liberals from 1999 until the run-up to the 2009 election.

Now its the PCs turn.

Sort of like we dont have a two party system, but there is only enough oxygen for one alternative to the NDP to be taken seriously. It has been like that for more than a dozen years now. Which does not say it is going to last.

Slumberjack

The fog and stench of neoliberalism hangs heavy over the Atlantic coast.  For those who continue to maintain any faith at all in the political system, they're prone to gasping hi and low in search of a breath of fresh air that is nowhere to be found. 

For Nova Scotia's version of the marionette theatre, citizens are waking up from the usual performance to the fact that the NSNDP appeared better at remembering their lines while in opposition.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Whatever the result of the next Nova Scotia election, the NSNDP needs to depose Dexter as leader as soon as the election is over.  He will never be popular again and he will never be capable of governing as anything other than a PC in an orange tie. 

 

jerrym

In an Angus Reid poll of 7,091 voters on the popularity of premiers, New Brunswick Premier David Alward had a 41% approval rating while NDP leader Dominic Cardy had 37% and Liberal leader Brian Gallant was at 41%.

Among NDP opposition leaders, Lorraine Michael came first at 61% ( Newfoundland), while BC's Dix tied for third place with Ontario's Andrea Horvath behind  and Danielle Smith (Alberta -Wildrose) at 53%. 

http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/48733/saskatchewans-wall-keeps-place-as-...

Cardy, considering the relatively historic low position of the NDP in New Brunswick, is doing well, as are many other NDP leaders, with Cardy polling only 4 points behind the other party leaders in the province. 

Aristotleded24

Ken Burch wrote:
Whatever the result of the next Nova Scotia election, the NSNDP needs to depose Dexter as leader as soon as the election is over.  He will never be popular again and he will never be capable of governing as anything other than a PC in an orange tie.

A defeat of the Dexter government would also help take the wind out of the sails of the Blairite wing, which always holds up the Nova Scotia and Manitoba wings as examples of why NDP principles need to be watered down.

jerrym

In an Angus Reid poll of 7,091 voters on the popularity of premiers, only 30% of Nova Scotians approve of the performance of Darrell Dexter, while Liberal leader Stephen McNeil is at 48% and Progressive Conservative leader Jamie Baillie has 36%.

Among NDP opposition leaders, Lorraine Michael came first at 61% ( Newfoundland), while BC's Dix tied for third place with Ontario's Andrea Horvath behind  and Danielle Smith (Alberta -Wildrose) at 53%. 

http://www.angus-reid.com/polls/48733/saskatchewans-wall-keeps-place-as-...

Dexter clearly has an uphill fight to win the next election but while the lead of his opponents is substantial, it is not overwhelming. Clearly many NDP opposition leaders across the country are doing well.  

There were no results given for PEI even in the full Angus Reid report. I suspect this was because they did not have a large enough sample to make it statisically reliable because of PEI's small population.

 

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

If Dexter lost, would any ground actually be lost at all?  Would anyone even notice?

NorthReport

Lots of Orange near the top but what in the world is Dexter's problem?

Do they need to replace him with a  leadership convention right away, or does the NS NDP prefer committing hari-kari?

http://www.threehundredeight.com/2013/04/approval-ratings-for-30-premier...

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

His problem is he has governed to the right of the Liberals.  A new leader might help but only if they promise to be a left wing party which is what the people of NS thought they were voting for when they elected Dexter.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

The problem is, it's likely that the inner circle of the NSNDP are all paid-up members of the "Nothing Doing" tendency...passionately committed to keeping the party uncommitted.

felixr

I agree with what David wrote but to that I would add that the PC to NDP switch in the last election was rather atypical. The NDP's strength has been primarily in Halifax and there the draw was more from Liberals, so the PC-NDP switch was more of a recent phenomenom. So what is the historical pattern? Well, a little more of PC-Liberal switching in rural areas. So I think part of this is a reversion to old patterns. The other part is the total lack of traction of the PCs since being turfed from government (the word "rebuilding" or "penalty box" comes in mind). The last bit is a global loss of support for the NDP. So the one-time PC-NDP switchers have now gone back to the Liberals. It reminds me of the pattern in Ontario where after the voters turfed the Liberals (Peterson), they elected the NDP (Rae), and then they elected the PCs (Harris), and then they went back to the Liberals (McGuinty), does that boost the current ONDP's chances?

KenS

Not at all true what you say about the PC-NDP switching. It has been going on since 1997

In my experience, in rural NS we got MORE  switching from the PCs than the Liberals. Although that was my experience of who comes in to volunteer on campaigns, which is not necessarily moving the same dynamic of voter shifting. But I think that was also borne out by internal party polls.

Still, anything could be happening now. And that is related to how you are wrong: NS voters have broken from the old moulds, most of them for good. That said, there are a lot of indications the NDP has established a pretty high floor of support.... but only high enough to mean that coming out in first [usually with a plurality] is always very much in reach... and whatever the polls say when there is not an election immediately imminent.

KenS

Lesson from that Ontario history you are talking about: its not anywhere near that much about the parties, and voters do not spend their lives deciding what brand fits them best now.

Also, those shifts include a LOT of people shifting in different and contradictory directions, for different reasons.

Mind you, we dont have that degree of recent [or ever] 'historical volatility' here.

jerrym

The NDP are now in a statistical tie (with the Cons) for second place in New Brunswick. Notice the coverage - the PCs and NDP were "stuck" in a statistical tie, even though this represents a historic change from the also-ran usual position of the NDP in New Brunswick. 

Quote:

Liberal Leader Brian Gallant witnessed a growth in popularity for both his party and his leadership in the last three months, according to the latest Corporate Research Associates poll.

The Liberals opened up a lead in party support with 41 per cent of respondents saying they would vote for Gallant’s party.

The Progressive Conservatives and New Democratic Party were stuck in a statistical tie for second place, according to the CRA poll.

The Tories were supported by 29 per cent of respondents compared to 27 per cent who supported the NDP.

The satisfaction level for Premier David Alward's government has dropped to 38 per cent, according to the CRA poll. (CBC)

The Liberals gained six percentage points between February and May, while the Tories lost three percentage points and the NDP inched up by one percentage point.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/new-brunswick/story/2013/06/06/nb-cra-poli...

 

jerrym

In terms of New Brunswick party leaders, all the party leaders are roughly 10% less popular than their party. However, the NDP's Dominic Cardy continues his upward climb in popularity. 

Quote:

David Alward’s personal popularity is stable this quarter, with two in ten New Brunswick residents preferring Alward for Premier (20%, compared with 21%). Meanwhile, Brian Gallant of the Liberal Party is preferred by three in ten (31%, compared with 26%) and support for Dominic Cardy of the NDP stands at 17% (compared with 15%).

http://cra.ca/popularity-of-nb-liberals-growing/

Stockholm

jerrym wrote:

In terms of New Brunswick party leaders, all the party leaders are roughly 10% less popular than their party. However, the NDP's Dominic Cardy continues his upward climb in popularity. 

Quote:

David Alward’s personal popularity is stable this quarter, with two in ten New Brunswick residents preferring Alward for Premier (20%, compared with 21%). Meanwhile, Brian Gallant of the Liberal Party is preferred by three in ten (31%, compared with 26%) and support for Dominic Cardy of the NDP stands at 17% (compared with 15%).

http://cra.ca/popularity-of-nb-liberals-growing/

 

Its not quite true, CRA reports vote intention as a percent of people expressing a preference - they don't count the 40% who are undecided. When they ask "best Premier" they don't do that - they leave the DK/NAs in and that brings all the leader's totals down.

NorthReport
NorthReport
jerrym

While the Liberals continue to grow in support in NB, the NDP has inched ahead of the PCs by one point (a statistical tie) as PC popularity continues to fall. 

 

Quote:
 

The NB Liberal Party continues to gain support, according to the most recent survey conducted by Corporate Research Associates Inc. Almost one-half of New Brunswick decided voters support the Liberal Party (47%, up from 41% in May 2013). Meanwhile, almost one-quarter back the governing PC Party (23%, down from 29% three months ago), and a similar number support the NDP (24%, compared with 27%). Green Party support is stable (4%, compared with 3%), while three percent of decided voters back the People’s Alliance of New Brunswick (compared with 1%). The number of residents who are undecided rests at 30 percent (compared with 33%), while seven percent refuse to state a preference (compared with 6%), and six percent support none of the parties or do not plan to vote (compared with 5%).

Presently, approximately four in ten New Brunswick residents are either completely or mostly satisfied with the provincial government (38%, unchanged from May 2013), while over one-half (54%, compared with 51%) are dissatisfied. One in ten do not offer an opinion (8%, compared with 11%).

David Alward’s personal popularity is stable this quarter, with two in ten New Brunswick residents preferring Alward for Premier (19%, compared with 20%). Meanwhile, Brian Gallant of the Liberal Party is preferred by three in ten (30%, compared with 31%) and support for Dominic Cardy of the NDP stands at 15 percent (compared with 17%). Four percent (unchanged) prefer David Coon of the Green Party, while four percent (compared with 2%) prefer Kris Austin of the People’s Alliance of New Brunswick.

http://cra.ca/popularity-of-nb-liberals-continues-to-grow/