Babble Book Club: Upcoming selection ideas?

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Catchfire Catchfire's picture

I like Inconvenient Indian -- it will give me te push to finally pick it up. I also like the FB suggestion of Harsha Walia's new book -- I know it's not in libraries, but it should be widely available online. And perhaps we could make an exception to support a courageous young activist?

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

I was planning to read "Inconvenient Indian" now that my partner has finished it. This might be the push I need for it to be my next book.

Left Turn Left Turn's picture

I like the suggestion of Harsha's new book Undoing Border Imperialism. It's going to be one of my next reads anyways, it'd be great to support a friend and courageous activist, and I'd imagine that Harsha will be up for an author discussion.

From what I hear, the People's Co-Op Bookstore is planning to have copies in the store by mid-November.

Caissa

The Inconvenient Indian is an excellent book. I read it last month. I wonder if we could as a practice alternate fiction and non-fiction books.

infracaninophile infracaninophile's picture

Caissa wrote:

The Inconvenient Indian is an excellent book. I read it last month. I wonder if we could as a practice alternate fiction and non-fiction books.

 

I second that motion!

Kaitlin McNabb Kaitlin McNabb's picture

I like the idea of alternating fiction and non-fiction as well as the other suggestions.

While I like the idea of Harsha Walia's new book, since it just (I mean JUST) came out, I would feel more comfortable holding off just because we would be more or less forcing people to buy it. (But then we would support her!)

Obviously Thomas King we should read, but it is a matter of balancing the holds for people as well.

I think if we are all going to forcibly purchase a book, it seems like The Inconvenient Indian is the one people are leaning more towards.

All that being said, if we want to alternate genres, we need fiction suggestions!

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

An Alice Munro and Lynne Coady collab to celebrate the Canadian Year of the Short Story? The plus side is the amazing Twitter hashtags we could use. Like: #MuCo or #CaYeShoSto

Unionist

I 100% support Catchfire's suggestions, whether jointly or severally. I'll happily re-read Munro (it's been a long time), and I just started the first story ("Wireless") in Hellgoing.

To be honest, while "non-fiction" in general is unobjectionable, I'm not all that keen on reading and discussing political treatises in the context of the book lounge. Let's be literary here.

Just my two ... er, we abolished those... just my 2/5 of a nickel.

ETA: #MakingHashofTags

 

Kaitlin McNabb Kaitlin McNabb's picture

Catchfire wrote:

An Alice Munro and Lynne Coady collab to celebrate the Canadian Year of the Short Story? The plus side is the amazing Twitter hashtags we could use. Like: #MuCo or #CaYeShoSto

You are KILLING IT with the hashtag references today CF!

I like the idea of Munro, for sure. I feel Lynn Coady books will be hard to come by after her great win yesterday!

I am working books tomorrow, so let's have our final decision by then so we can all get reading!

My vote is something Alice Munro, potentially her latest, Dear Life

Caissa

Munro works for me.  I re-read The Lives of Cirls and Women over the summer.

Left Turn Left Turn's picture

I checked the availability of Dear Life at the Vanvcouver, Burnaby, Toronto and St. John libraries. Not surprisingly there are holds on it at all the libraries, so we'll have difficulty getting our hands on it without buying.

My suggestion for a fiction selection is [url=http://www.amazon.ca/Communists-Daughter-Dennis-Bock/dp/0006392377/ref=s... Communists Dughter[/url] by Dennis Bock.

Unionist

Left Turn wrote:

My suggestion for a fiction selection is [url=http://www.amazon.ca/Communists-Daughter-Dennis-Bock/dp/0006392377/ref=s... Communists Dughter[/url] by Dennis Bock.

Sounds interesting. [url=http://www.nytimes.com/2007/03/04/books/chapters/0304-1st-bock.html]Here is Chapter 1[/url] (haven't read it yet).

I loved Ted Allen's The Scalpel, the Sword way back when. Must dust off my decades-old copy and try it again.

But I'm still kinda leaning to Munro or Coady (which reminds me, gotta get back to reading Hellgoing).

Or wait... for a brand-new fiction selection... how about the Charter Affirming The Values Of Secularism And The Religious Neutrality Of The State, As Well As The Equality Of Men And Women, And The Framing Of Accommodation Requests - full text to be tabled today, and definitely will be available at cost?

 

Kaitlin McNabb Kaitlin McNabb's picture

Unionist wrote:

But I'm still kinda leaning to Munro or Coady (which reminds me, gotta get back to reading Hellgoing).

Or wait... for a brand-new fiction selection... how about the Charter Affirming The Values Of Secularism And The Religious Neutrality Of The State, As Well As The Equality Of Men And Women, And The Framing Of Accommodation Requests - full text to be tabled today, and definitely will be available at cost?

1. that is the longest title ever and I can safety say, I do not want to read it. Laughing

2. LET'S DO MUNRO! We have done Lynn Coady in the past (woot).

I figured Dear Life would have a billion holds -- damn!

Does anyone have suggestions for Munro favs? Old or new?

Kaitlin McNabb Kaitlin McNabb's picture

I want to executive decision this one, but I just don't know what Munro book to choose! Help!

Unionist

These are 17 stories Munro chose herself for a selection called "Alice Munro's Best", also issued under the title "My Best Stories", with an introduction by Margaret Atwood:

http://www.goodreads.com/book/show/6067967-my-best-stories

But whichever.

 

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

Is Lives of Girls and Women too obvious? Because it's amazing.

I would also say Who do you think you are?  There is also her Selected Stories which we could just read what we liked from it (since it's long).

ETA: My backup is Framing of Accommodation Requests et al. (2013)

Left Turn Left Turn's picture

I'm not really a fan of Alice Munro, or of short stories in general. So if the next pick is Alice Munro short stories, I'm gonna pass.

Unionist

Left Turn - why not give it a try? The conversation here may spark some perspectives for you that you hadn't arrived at on your own. That's what happened to me with Aguirre, which I disliked at first reading, but I was focusing on certain aspects to the exclusion of others.

I've decided to read books for the book club that I likely wouldn't have picked on my own, because the conversation has its own value.

Anyway, just a thought.

 

NDPP

NOT The Cellist of Sarajevo by Steven Galloway!

 

Out of The War, Into A Book And In A Rage

http://www.theaustralian.com.au/arts/out-of-the-war-into-a-book-and-in-a...

"It was like the explosion of an atomic bomb, emotions of anger and pain,' he says. 'How is this possible? They steal my name and identity. Nobody can take the rights to that from me..."

Kaitlin McNabb Kaitlin McNabb's picture

We've had a couple suggestions of Live of Girls and Women -- seems like a very interesting read. I'm just scoping out library holds for everyone at the moment.

Kaitlin McNabb Kaitlin McNabb's picture

Can holds are there, but seemingly moving fast. Also there is a lot of ebook copies of this book too. And the possibility of sharing from friends and secondhand book stores.

Should we make the final decision of 'Lives of Girls and Women'

Unionist

I'm in!

Caissa

I just read it again this summer. I wasn't suggesting it. I'd rather read something by her that I haven't read although I could enjoy a break from BBC if that is what y'all want to read.

Unionist

I just wanted to get the indecision over with. Why not just suggest some other Munro work or some stories you haven't read, Caissa? I had suggested her selected stories, and CF said maybe we could do just some of those because it's long. I'd obviously be fine with that too.

Kaitlin McNabb Kaitlin McNabb's picture

Yeah, I just want to get the ball rolling to be honest -- I've let the indecision take over! Ahh!

I think reading Munro is excellent, and there has been a minor consensus both on Facebook and here to read 'Lives of Girls and Women' so that is the best bet and I'm going to draw up the papers. Smile

That said, Caissa (or any of you!!!) never leave us. Everyone's input in important, but understand if you need a break or don't feel like re-reading! Laughing

We're gonna shorten the reading time to Friday November 13, one month exactly! And I'll do better to have our next non-fiction selection worked out from everyone's suggestions for next time. Our over the holiday read!

I really like this idea of fiction-non-fiction-fiction format

Caissa

What if we all read something difeerent by her and just discussed her as an author?

Unionist

Kaitlin McNabb wrote:

We're gonna shorten the reading time to Friday November 13, one month exactly!

Actually, the next Friday November 13 will be in 2015, so that makes 2 years. We could probably handle a longer book!

[*** Ducks for cover ***]

Caissa wrote:

What if we all read something difeerent by her and just discussed her as an author?

I like that! Or, we could read the same work by different authors (like maybe something called "My Life").

Kaitlin McNabb Kaitlin McNabb's picture

Ha. ha. U.

must we never err on babble Wink

I like the idea of everyone just reading Munro books -- it's easier to be honest, well easier theoretically -- but last time we did a "pick your own short story book to discuss" it didn't go so well.

Perhaps, given the central author, we could venture another try?

sherpa-finn

Sounds like a decision to me, KM!

Perhaps having one or two over-arching themes or questions in mind as we read might provide a useful framework for the coming discussion?  

Any suggestions as to likely themes or questions?

Caissa

I just checked The Moons of Jupiter out of the library. I think  a few things to look for in her works are character development, the interaction of setting and character and gender.

Kaitlin McNabb Kaitlin McNabb's picture

Good point SF and C! We'll do multiple Alice Munro and discuss overarching themes as well as the specific books we read. Thanks all!

BBC posts up TODAY! Working on them soon!

Unionist

Kaitlin McNabb wrote:

We'll do multiple Alice Munro and discuss overarching themes as well as the specific books we read. Thanks all!

1. Are we all reading Lives of Girls and Women (I'm fine with that); or

2. Are we all reading some other specific book or stories (I'm fine with that) - like The Moons of Jupiter or a selection of specific stories; or

3. Is everyone reading whichever Alice Munro they want and then we talk about "overarching themes" (I don't see how that will work).

Why is this so difficult?

ETA: Sneak preview: For our next selection after this one, I'll probably be suggesting [url=Svend">http://rabble.ca/books/reviews/2013/11/svend-robinson-life-politics-refl... Robinson: A Life in Politics[/url]

 

Caissa

I think option 3 is the one, Unionist. Can you put it into contract language? Wink

Unionist

Caissa wrote:

I just checked The Moons of Jupiter out of the library.

Ok, I'll read it too. Can't afford to let Caissa's opinions monopolize the conversation.

Quote:

I think  a few things to look for in her works are character development, the interaction of setting and character and gender.

I think I'm uncomfortable with the idea of pre-selecting overarching "themes" in our discussions. A book is a book. Why should I read it and/or discuss it with someone else's idea in my mind of what I should be looking for?

 

Caissa

I was just pointing out a few themes that seem to cross her work, Unionist.  The need for themes only arises when we read multiple books; it gives us something to jump off from in the discssion. Of course, other themes will arise and do in her writing.  Reading with themes in mind doesn't preclude seeing other things arise. Glad you aren't a student in one of my courses, Unionist.Tongue out

Kaitlin McNabb Kaitlin McNabb's picture

So tomorrow is our Munro discussion and we need a non-fiction book for our next selection.

Here are a few suggestions from my end:

- The Drunken Botanist:the plants that create the world's great drinks; seems very interest, a history of plants, alochols and world history. And is surprisingly available at libraries across Canada from what I have checked

- Salt: a world history; also supposed to be good. And is available at libraries in book and ebook form (again a bit surprising)

Left Turn Left Turn's picture

Been wanting to read up on rape culture, so my suggestion is [url=http://www.amazon.ca/Yes-Means-Visions-Female-Without/dp/1580052576]Yes Means Yes!: Visions of Female Sexual Power and A World Without Rape[/url]

Kaitlin McNabb Kaitlin McNabb's picture

Oh I read that a few years ago and it is an excellent collection of essays on consent. I would say it goes beyond rape culture and also addresses the idea of female desire and views of female sexuality.

It is very interesting.

Kaitlin McNabb Kaitlin McNabb's picture

FYI I've started a poll in our Facebook group with those three selections. Let me know (or add your own) of other non-fiction selections and please vote on Facebook or in this thread!

sherpa-finn

Two non-fiction books on my reading list for the holidays, FWIW: 

"An Inconvenient Indian" by Thomas King. (I think someone had suggested that for BBC recently.) My son bought a copy for a university course last term so there is a copy readily at hand. 

Also, a copy of 'Long Walk to Freedom' has been sitting on the living room shelf here for a couple of years now, yet untouched. In the circumstances, its seems an appropriate time to crack that one open.

laine lowe laine lowe's picture

I have my copy of "The Inconvenient Indian" ready to pick up and read should this be your next selection. I had taken out "1491" from the library but I didn't have time to dig into it. I have heard fantastic reviews (Aboriginal life before the arrival of Columbus).

I've read "Salt" and loved it.

Unionist

I'm good with either Inconvenient Indian (which I read and enjoyed and have commented on somewhere here a few months ago); or Salt or 1491 or Long Walk to Freedom (I have all three but haven't read them yet).

 

Caissa

I voted on Facebook but I'm happy with any of the above suggestions. I also have a copy of Long Walk to Freedom sitting waiting to be read. IIRC, it is quite long.

Unionist

Yeah, my epub version is 1489 "pages", which is probably around 700 in forestry terms.

By the way, here's a quote which may have been prescient:

Mandela wrote:
While I was stimulated by the Communist Manifesto, I was exhausted by Das Kapital.

Kaitlin McNabb Kaitlin McNabb's picture

K added The Inconvenient Indian by Thomas King to the facebook poll -- voters are able to re-vote if they wish. I'm still a little concerned about accessibility for this book, but that will probably always been an issue with this book!

Let's let voting happen for a couple more days -- but am I right to assume it is either 'Salt' or 'Inconvenient Indian' as the frontrunners?

Caissa

Participation in BBC seems to be on the decline.

Caissa

 Have we ever considered lining up a reading list for a calendar year rather than choosing books one at a time?

Kaitlin McNabb Kaitlin McNabb's picture

Happy holidays everyone!

After some chatting on facebook, we should indeed set up a calendar to alternate our selections and be more efficient.

It's seems like the time has come to read The Inconvenient Indian, so let's start of the new year with a bang and go with that! I'm going to push this final reading date a bit just because of the holiday and all that good stuff.

I'm going to figure out if I can make a calendar in the facebook group, but regardless I'll start lining stuff up here too! Official blog posts to come today as well!

Caissa

I have read it and loved it. I probably should re-read it closer to the scheduled discussion date.

Kaitlin McNabb Kaitlin McNabb's picture

Nice!

I've started our calendar thread for reading selections -- we'll need a fiction selection for the next one, and I've put the Salt: A World History as the next non-fiction selection too.

 

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