"A Tale for the Time Being", by Ruth Ozeki: DISCUSSION Friday, August 12, 1:00 PM EDT

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ikosmos ikosmos's picture

My own fiction book list at present:

Red Star: the First Bolshevik Utopia by Alexander Bogdanov. I've been reading a pile of SF lately:

Kim Stanley Robinson,

Octavia E. Butler,

re-read Arundhati Roy's The God of Small Things,

and, since Fidel just died, to finally read from cover to cover his favorite book (For Whom the Bells Toll by E Hemingway).

I have a Wikipedia-created book on Collected Works of Bertoldt Brecht and am looking forward to it.

 

My non-fiction list is much, much longer.

Caissa

I have the latest Kim Stanley Robinson book, Aurora.

Unionist

Caissa wrote:

I have the latest Kim Stanley Robinson book, Aurora.

Me too. Never read any of his books yet. I'd be good with that (if you think so, Caissa). I'd also be fine with any of Arundathi Roy's books. Which is her latest? Gotta go check.

Or anything else! Within reason.

sherpa-finn

I read that Roy's new book is not out until next year. 

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Does it have to be a newly released book? Hemingway's For the Whom the Bell Tolls should be easy to find. Anyway, I'm already into ch 3.

Caissa

It has been years since I read it. I am up for anything we can reach consensus on.

sherpa-finn

I have a copy somewhere on these shelves ... will probably take me longer to find it than read it. But count me in. 

Unionist

I'm in for Hemingway. I'll open a new thread soon. What deadline should we set? It's a longish book - at least, that's what I recall from when I last read it about half a century ago.

Caissa

I picked up a copy from the university library. How about  January 13, 2017?

Unionist

Caissa wrote:

I picked up a copy from the university library. How about  January 13, 2017?

Works for me. Others? I think I'll send a group PM to the usual suspects...

sherpa-finn

Sure. Let's go with Friday the 13th. What could possibly go wrong? 

cco

Unionist wrote:

Caissa wrote:

I have the latest Kim Stanley Robinson book, Aurora.

Me too. Never read any of his books yet.

I was a big fan of the Mars trilogy in the 90s. The Years of Rice and Salt was also pretty good. Haven't read anything of his lately, though.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

"It's a good book," he said, looking around more carefully now, where the pine needle forest joined the green slope of the alpine meadow.

"But you always say that," she said, smiling, and shifting the submachine gun in the crook of her left arm.

"Yes, but it is true this time." Just then, Lieutenant Berrendo rode up the trail.

Caissa

Finished  For Whom the Bell Tolls over the vacation period.

Unionist

Caissa wrote:

Finished  For Whom the Bell Tolls over the vacation period.

I haven't even started. Embarassed

And given the way my life has been going (unexpectedly busy), I have zero confidence I'll be finished in time.

I'm really sorry, folks. It looked easier when it was farther away. Some kind of inverse metaphor for life's goals.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Finished. I can see why Fidel Castro Ruz liked it so much.

sherpa-finn

Is this still on for Friday, - or is it getting bumped?  Just wondering.... 

Caissa

I am in and out of meetings all day today but could throw in the occassional though.

Unionist

Sadly, my pessimism proved accurate.

I could critique other people's opinions, but not offer many of my own.

Wait a minute... isn't that one of babble's defining features?

Unless others are ready and available, let's figure out something else.

Friday the 13th. Shoulda known. Wasn't meant to be.

Caissa

How about a one week extension?

Unionist

Caissa wrote:

How about a one week extension?

Doesn't work for me. I'm busy with work every day till then (almost). Two weeks... might do it.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Spoiler alert.

The story follows protagonist Robert Jordan in his role as a dynamiter working in/for one of the International Brigades during the 1930's defence of the Spanish Republic against Franco's fascists. One of the most striking things about the novel is the terse language used by the characters in the story. I think this laconic style is generally indicative for Hemingway; it is, however, perfectly suited to the subject matter and has an effect on attentive readers.

The story matters to the whole world then ... and still does.

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