Free Software, Free Society - the Free Software Thread

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radiorahim radiorahim's picture
Free Software, Free Society - the Free Software Thread

..-.  ._.  .  .   ... ___ .._. _ .__ ._  ._.  .

 

 

 

 

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

The Free Software Foundation defines "free software" in the following way:

Free Software Definition

The following are some programmes that you might like to try out that meet (or almost
meet) the free software definition.   All are licensed under either the GNU General Public
License (GPL), the Lesser GNU General Public License (LGPL) or the Mozilla Public License
(MPL).

Most of these programmes are "cross platform", with versions available for Windows, MacOSX,
GNU/Linux and sometimes versions of Unix and other operating systems.

Web Browsers:

Firefox
Flock
K-Meleon (Windows only)
Sea Monkey

E-Mail and Calendaring

Thunderbird

Web Page Creation

Kompozer
(Composer feature in Sea Monkey)

Office Suite (Word Processing, Spreadsheets, Presentations, Databases)

OpenOffice

Word Processing

Abiword

Spreadsheets

Gnumeric   (primarily for GNU/Linux, the Windows version is a bit unstable)

Desktop Publishing

Scribus

Vector Graphics

Inkscape

Photo/Image Editing

The Gimp

FTP

Filezilla

Podcast Receiver

Juice

Media Players

VLC Media Player
Miro
Real Alternative (Windows only)
Quicktime Alternative (Windows only)

"Stand Alone" RSS Feed Agregator

RSS Owl

Instant Messaging

Pidgin

Audio Editing

Audacity

Video Editing (simple)

Avidemux

3D Modelling and Animation

Blender

CD/DVD Burning

Infrarecorder  (Windows only)

Streaming Audio Capture

Streamripper

Hopefully this is enough to get you started, so that you can begin to free your computer from the shackles of proprietary software.

Experiment and have fun trying out some new stuff!

 

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

Well done, rr. Fight the Power.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Any free (and fun!) games that don't take a long time to download? I'm stuck in a hospital residence until next Monday, with lousy internet access.

Michelle

Frozen Bubble is possibly THE most addictive game ever.

If you want to try it online first, click here.

Here's where you download it if you're using Windows.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Thanks Michelle, I'll have a look!

Frustrated Mess Frustrated Mess's picture

You might add photography:

Digikam

f-Spot

My favorite music player:

Amarok

 

My Cat Knows Better My Cat Knows Better's picture

If you are going to go with free software, why not go the whole way and download an open source operating system. There are hundreds of various Linux distributions out there for the downloading. Most are highly configurable and in spite of some of the stories of past problems configuring, most are a piece of cake to install. I am not a big fan of the KDE desktop so have settled on Ubuntu with the Gnome interface. For my purposes, its quicker, safer and a breath of fresh air after a career using Windows. Virus control at this point is something other people worry about. Paying for software that doesn't live up to expectations is not an issue and software piracy is something Linux users don't need to do to cut costs.

My Cat Knows Better My Cat Knows Better's picture

Frustrated Mess wrote:

My favorite music player:

Amarok

Amerok is nice and I have used it but my preference is Banshee, works well with an iPod. I installed "Sound Converter" with Synaptic to take care of some of the more obscure audio file formats.

My Cat Knows Better My Cat Knows Better's picture

Google Picassa for Linux is handy for cataloguing digital pictures and nice for uploading to the net.

My Cat Knows Better My Cat Knows Better's picture

deleted double post.  Embarassed

peterjcassidy peterjcassidy's picture

For free games:

The Battle for Wesnoth

The Battle for Wesnoth is a free, turn-based tactical strategy game with a high fantasy theme, featuring both single-player, and online/hotseat multiplayer combat. Fight a desperate battle to reclaim the throne of Wesnoth, or take hand in any number of other adventures... more »

The Battle for Wesnoth team is proud to release version 1.6 of The Battle for Wesnoth. We really hope you enjoy Wesnoth 1.6 as much as we enjoyed creating it. You can learn more and read the in-depth, translated release notes »
-->

Download Wesnoth 1.6.5 (stable):

Download Wesnoth 1.7.6 (development):

  • Source (256.7MB)
  • Linux
  • Windows (239.9MB)
  • MacOSX (260.7MB)
  • and more.
  • ...................................
  • Online
  • Grand Strategy Grand Strategy was inspired by the board game Risk. It is a multiplayer game of strategy where the object is simple: eliminate your opponents and achieve global domination!

     


    Play Grand Strategy

Frustrated Mess Frustrated Mess's picture

Just installed Linux Mint 7 ( http://www.linuxmint.com/ ). A beautiful desktop.

ETA: With ext4. Blazingly fast.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

My Cat Knows Better wrote:

If you are going to go with free software, why not go the whole way and download an open source operating system. There are hundreds of various Linux distributions out there for the downloading. Most are highly configurable and in spite of some of the stories of past problems configuring, most are a piece of cake to install. I am not a big fan of the KDE desktop so have settled on Ubuntu with the Gnome interface. For my purposes, its quicker, safer and a breath of fresh air after a career using Windows. Virus control at this point is something other people worry about. Paying for software that doesn't live up to expectations is not an issue and software piracy is something Linux users don't need to do to cut costs.

I quite agree...but if users "get used" to running free software applications on their proprietary operating systems then it's very easy to make the switch over to a GNU/Linux operating system.

I kind of like the KDE desktop...but I'm running a Gnome desktop version of Linux Mint 7 on this notebook.   I run Ubuntu Studio edition on my main desktop right now...and have been running versions of Linux with the "lighter weight" XFCE desktop on some older machines...of PII and PIII vintage.

 

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Frustrated Mess wrote:

You might add photography:

Digikam

f-Spot

My favorite music player:

Amarok

 

 

I see that there is a bit of work being done on porting some of the KDE desktop applications over to Windows...so that Windows users can eventually get a taste of what we GNU/Linux users have been enjoying for years....but the KDE for Windows stuff is a little on the experimental side right now.

I absolutely LOVE AmaRoK as an audio player.   AmaRoK 1.4 is fantastic...for playing your audio files, streaming audio, subscribing to podcasts etc.    AmaRoK 2.0 still needs some work though.   I have 2.0 on my Linux Mint 7 machine and some of the features that I used to love on 1.4 aren't there yet...but I guess they will come.

For photography, I've always kind of liked "Gwenview" on GNU/Linux

 

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

My Cat Knows Better wrote:

Google Picassa for Linux is handy for cataloguing digital pictures and nice for uploading to the net.

Google Picasa is freeware but it is proprietary software.   The license does not give you the "four freedoms" of free software as defined in the "free software definition".

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

My Cat Knows Better wrote:

Frustrated Mess wrote:

My favorite music player:

Amarok

Amerok is nice and I have used it but my preference is Banshee, works well with an iPod. I installed "Sound Converter" with Synaptic to take care of some of the more obscure audio file formats.

I don't have an iPod.   I have a portable music player made by Cowon and "out of the box" it plays patent-free audio formats like ogg vorbis and FLAC (Free Lossless Audio Codec).    CD's ripped to FLAC format are compressed without any of the losses that you get with "lossy" audio formats like mp3.   Of course the files are quite a bit larger.

The Cowon players are the only ones I know of that will play FLAC files.

 

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

In related news, Dell Computers has been obliged to

REFUND A PC USER FOR REJECTING WINDOWS OPERATING SYSTEM.

Dell refunds user for rejecting Windows.

 

HOO RAH!!!!

Tigana Tigana's picture

Firefox now offers a lovely bell add-on -

"Plays a Tibetan bowl chime at random intervals to evoke mindfulness."

https://addons.mozilla.org/en-US/firefox/addon/4997

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

N.Beltov wrote:

In related news, Dell Computers has been obliged to

REFUND A PC USER FOR REJECTING WINDOWS OPERATING SYSTEM.

Dell refunds user for rejecting Windows.

 

HOO RAH!!!!

It's possible, with some difficulty to get a refund on the Windows license.   I've seen a few stories on the net over the years where folks have gone to small claims court to get a refund.

On the bright side, Dell does offer a limited number of computers for sale with Ubuntu Linux pre-installed.   You have to dig through their website to get one though...they don't actively promote them.

 

 

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Another way to install Ubuntu Linux on your Windows machine is to use "Wubi" (Windows Ubuntu Installer).

There are a couple of ways to do it.

One way is to simply pop a Ubuntu disk into your Windows machine, and then the "Wubi" installer dialogue box pops up on your screen. You tell Windows how much hard drive space you want to allocate to Ubuntu, do a few simple mouse clicks and in a few minutes, it's installed.

When you boot up, you'll have the option of either going into Windows or going into Ubuntu Linux.

I did this on my office machine and to tell you the truth, even though Ubuntu Linux is running "inside" of Windows XP as a programme, it seems to run faster than Windows XP.

The other way to do a "Wubi install" is simply to download "Wubi" from here.

You just run the installer and it'll grab Ubuntu off the net and install it.   Obviously you'll need a high speed internet connection to do this.

Another way to make use of a GNU/Linux operating system...even if you are using a Windows computer is when you're doing secure transactions like online banking or online purchasing...particularly if you're not using your own computer and might be worried about how secure that Windows system is.

Most GNU/Linux distros these days can be run in "live CD" or "live DVD" mode...or can be installed to a USB thumb drive.

So, you just boot the machine from the "live CD/DVD" or USB thumb drive, do whatever transactions you have to do, and then when you're finished your work, just remove the media and reboot the machine back into Windows.

There won't be any records of that transaction stored on that machine's hard drive.

The beauty of GNU/Linux is that there isn't just one distribution...there are dozens of them.   So, if you happen to have an old first generation Pentium with limited RAM and hard drive space, you can find a GNU/Linux version that will make that system run.   It might not be fast but it'll work!

One of the other common "tragedies" that I often hear about is when someone takes their Windows computer into a repair shop.  Usually the machines are going to the shop due to virus or spyware infections or perhaps a corrupted Windows registry.

And these poorly trained techs "solution" is frequently to completely wipe the computer users hard drive and to then re-install Windows.   The computer user ends up completely losing all of their personal data in the process.   Often these poorly trained techs don't even tell the computer user that's whats going to happen.

GNU/Linux comes to the rescue here too.   You can just boot your machine up using a "live" version of GNU/Linux, copy your personal data off the machine onto an external hard drive or USB thumb drive.    Then once you're satisfied that you've saved everything you need to save you can do your Windows re-install (not that I'd want to do that ;)  )

Knoppix is usually the best distro to use for "rescuing" Windows machines.   I've used it plenty of times.

 

 

 

 

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

For DVD or Video CD authoring you might want to try:

DeVeDe

The Windows version is available here

Windows users might also want to try DVD Flick

JimSterling JimSterling's picture

Nice freeware - Thanks!

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

radiorahim wrote:

Another way to install Ubuntu Linux on your Windows machine is to use "Wubi" (Windows Ubuntu Installer).

There are a couple of ways to do it.

One way is to simply pop a Ubuntu disk into your Windows machine, and then the "Wubi" installer dialogue box pops up on your screen. You tell Windows how much hard drive space you want to allocate to Ubuntu, do a few simple mouse clicks and in a few minutes, it's installed.

When you boot up, you'll have the option of either going into Windows or going into Ubuntu Linux.

Done. So my new notebook is dual boot. Thanks for the reminder, rr.

I'm having a little trouble getting the Linux OS to connect to the wireless network in the house, however. Helpful advice cheerfully accepted. Heh.

 

 

Frustrated Mess Frustrated Mess's picture

I have become a devotee of Mint Linux -- Through freedom came elegance. It is based on Ubuntu, artfully presented, and everything but DVD decryption right out of the box. No need for libraries and codes to play media. They're already there. And software ... a dream. Start typing what you're looking for and an option on the right is 'Install". It is a Gnome desktop but I can't live without some K apps such as Digikam. Luckily they co-exist quite nicely.

Brian White

Is sea monkey just the old netscape suite updated? So it is a bit more than a web browser. (I only use it for composing webpages and it does it well enough for me.   And I have always found the learning curve for blender to be like a thousand meter cliff. Its start page is horrific and has been since the dawn of time.

I use art of illusion which has an easy learning curve.  Art of illusion is free but it has copywrite.

Perhaps you should include some screen capture programs too?

I now have a good linux screencapture program (with audio capture). Only problem is that it saves in ogg video format and my video editing program does not read ogg.

Brian

 

radiorahim wrote:

Web Browsers:

Sea Monkey

E-Mail and Calendaring

Thunderbird

Web Page Creation

Kompozer
(Composer feature in Sea Monkey)

Office Suite (Word Processing, Spreadsheets, Presentations, Databases)

OpenOffice

Word Processing

Abiword

Spreadsheets

Gnumeric   (primarily for GNU/Linux, the Windows version is a bit unstable)

Desktop Publishing

Scribus

Vector Graphics

Inkscape

Photo/Image Editing

The Gimp

FTP

Filezilla

Podcast Receiver

Juice

Media Players

VLC Media Player
Miro
Real Alternative (Windows only)
Quicktime Alternative (Windows only)

"Stand Alone" RSS Feed Agregator

RSS Owl

Instant Messaging

Pidgin

Audio Editing

Audacity

Video Editing (simple)

Avidemux

3D Modelling and Animation

Blender

CD/DVD Burning

Infrarecorder  (Windows only)

Streaming Audio Capture

Streamripper

Hopefully this is enough to get you started, so that you can begin to free your computer from the shackles of proprietary software.

Experiment and have fun trying out some new stuff!

 

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Sea Monkey is what used to be the "Mozilla Web Suite" which was Netscape before they released the software code to the community.  Sea Monkey uses the "Gecko" rendering engine just as does Firefox, Flock, K-Meleon, Galeon, Epiphany and probably a few others I can't think of off the top of my head.    Some of the Firefox extensions will also work with Sea Monkey.

I can't comment on Blender, not being someone into animation stuff.   But there seems to be alot of online help with it including this Blender Wikibook.

I find it a bit strange that a free software video editing programme can't handle a file that's in the ogg theora video format.  Wonder what you're using?   My video editing experience is quite limited... but I've had difficulty from time to time with Quicktime .mov files using free software video editing tools.   I have a video camera that shoots video in that format.

As for screencapture programmes I usually just use whatever is installed with the distro...Ksnapshot for KDE based distros and Gnome Screenshot for Gnome based distros.

 

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Frustrated Mess wrote:

I have become a devotee of Mint Linux -- Through freedom came elegance. It is based on Ubuntu, artfully presented, and everything but DVD decryption right out of the box. No need for libraries and codes to play media. They're already there. And software ... a dream. Start typing what you're looking for and an option on the right is 'Install". It is a Gnome desktop but I can't live without some K apps such as Digikam. Luckily they co-exist quite nicely.

I'm also a Linux Mint fan...current version is Linux Mint 7.  They usually build around the Gnome desktop first...but also have an XFCE desktop version for older machines with a little less computer horsepower and a KDE version for KDE fans.

I'm not the biggest Gnome fan in the world...always kind of preferred KDE but I really like what the Linux Mint folks have done with their Gnome desktop.

Many GNU/Linux developers don't include proprietary audio and video codecs, add-ons etc. in some distributions for a combination of political and legal reasons.

They require you to install proprietary stuff yourself outside of the "default out of the box" installation.   That way if for example you live in the U.S. where they have the Digital Millenium Copyright Act (DMCA), you take whatever legal risks there are installing proprietary stuff instead of the developer.

In the case of Linux Mint, the main developer is based in Ireland and his attitude is "screw the U.S." and he includes this stuff in the "out of the box" install.   But he also makes a version of Linux Mint available that doesn't include patented audio/video codecs for folks in the U.S.

In the case of Debian (the distro that Ubuntu and others are based on), they don't even include Firefox but instead distribute a modified version of Firefox called "Ice Weasel".   The Debian developers play very close to the "free software definition" and consider certain "branding" rules on the distribution of Firefox by the Mozilla Foundation to be too restrictive.

So, they stripped out all Mozilla Foundation "branding" and distribute Ice Weasel instead.

Edited to add....

Hmmm...hard to keep up-to-date with this stuff.   Apparently "Ice Weasel" is now called "GNU Ice Cat"

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

N.Beltov wrote:

 

Done. So my new notebook is dual boot. Thanks for the reminder, rr.

I'm having a little trouble getting the Linux OS to connect to the wireless network in the house, however. Helpful advice cheerfully accepted. Heh.

Is it a problem with the wifi card device driver or is it a connection problem?   I know that wifi cards that are based on the "Broadcom" chipset can be a royal pain in the ass...as I understand Broadcom wouldn't release the specs of their cards to the community so that free software drivers could be developed.

Wifi cards built with the "Atheros" chipset should pretty much work right out of the box as they have free software drivers.   So, if you have to install an "add-on" wifi card and either currently use or plan to use GNU/Linux look for cards based on this chipset...they're "free software-friendly".

Michelle

Question - if you already have a bunch of programs installed on a Windows computer and then you decide to do a dual boot install of Linux, do you have to reinstall all the programs you've already installed in Windows?

Also, would you have to format your hard drive in order to install Linux with your Windows program?

I'd like to move to Linux entirely since pretty most of the programs I use now are free software, but there is one game that my son LOVES and that he plays with his friends that he can't live without - and wouldn't you know it, the people who make the game don't do one that's compatible with Linux.

So a dual boot is probably the best route for me.  I just wonder how much of a pain in the ass it would be to do it, that's all.

Michelle

Laptop.  Reliable backup.  Lots and lots of disk space.

Frustrated Mess Frustrated Mess's picture

The short answer is "No." The long answer is still "no" but leads to a whole bunch of questions like disk size? Available disk space? Desktop or Notebook? Reliable backup?

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

radiorahim wrote:
Is it a problem with the wifi card device driver or is it a connection problem?

I dunno. How would I know?

Quote:
Wifi cards built with the "Atheros" chipset should pretty much work right out of the box as they have free software drivers.   So, if you have to install an "add-on" wifi card and either currently use or plan to use GNU/Linux look for cards based on this chipset...they're "free software-friendly".

 

It's an Atheros product.

Fidel

[url=http://apcmag.com/how_to_dual_boot_windows_xp_and_linux_xp_installed_fir... to dual boot Windows XP and Linux (XP installed first)[/url] -- the step-by-step guide with screenshots

Maybe RadioRahim, F.M., My Cat Knows Better or someone could look at this tutorial and approve of or disapprove since they seem to be the Linux gurus around here. It's for XP, and I don't know if or what the diffs would be with installing on a partition alongside Vista or Win7.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

I don't have a great deal of experience with dual booting Windows and Linux but in general as I understand if you want to do this you you'll want to install Windows first and then install Linux.   It's just because Linux can "play" with other operating systems and Windows doesn't do this so well.

Also, you'll want to first do a very thorough defrag of your hard drive before installing Linux.   Windows has this habit of spraying files all over the hard drive and you don't want to accidently wipe some essential file when you re-partition your hard drive to make space for Linux.

The other thing you'll want to watch out for is Windows overwriting GRUB whenever they issue the inevitable "Service Pack".

The "Wubi" method of installing Ubuntu is much less "geeky"...Ubuntu simply runs as a programme within Windows.   You take a bit of a performance hit when you do it this way...but I've done this on my WinXP machine at my office and I think that Ubuntu still runs faster than WinXP...even running "within" XP.

 

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

N.Beltov wrote:

radiorahim wrote:
Is it a problem with the wifi card device driver or is it a connection problem?

I dunno. How would I know?

Wifi cards built with the "Atheros" chipset should pretty much work right out of the box as they have free software drivers.   So, if you have to install an "add-on" wifi card and either currently use or plan to use GNU/Linux look for cards based on this chipset...they're "free software-friendly".

If it's an Atheros card, it shouldn't be a problem with the driver.

I guess my question would be simply...what happens when you try to connect to your wifi router?

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Here are some online Linux Magazines that folks might find helpful

Free Software Magazine

Full Circle Magazine - Put out by the "Ubuntu" family of distros i.e Kubuntu, Xubuntu, Edubuntu, Mythbuntu, Ubuntu Studio Edition etc.

PCLinuxOS Magazine - Put out by the community around the "PCLinuxOS" distribution.

Regardless as to what Linux distro you use...and even if you're a Mac or Windows user you'll probably find some useful articles in these publications.    Many of the "free software" applications are "cross platform" in that they run on GNU/Linux, MacOSX and Windows.

Frustrated Mess Frustrated Mess's picture

Michelle wrote:

Laptop.  Reliable backup.  Lots and lots of disk space.

Then it won't be a problem. Most modern Linux distributions can resize your Windows partition to allow installation and dual-booting.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

"The Linux Link" is a website with links to dozens of Linux and free software related podcasts.

Enjoy!

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

I've sent you a PM, rr. When I try to connect using Network Manager, the choices available to me are nothing like the choices that are described in the help files. It's as if my Ubuntu 8.10 is some different version from the ones they are describing.

When I click on Network Manager there is no "list" that comes up. Nada.

thanks

the thing with 'free' software is its never really free.

like 'the map', as was mentioned last winter on a related blog, or squirrel, which has been raised many times, and seen at a police station too. 

the conundrum for me has always been that the price for access seems to be around handles.  there are obvious questions about feeling comfortable, aka being truly honest, in another's skin, about confusion for others, and also about the pollution of crass jokes and worse - commentary on things like 'father stalin' - inserting themselves into one's own name space. 

'so what?' some might say, but the problem is then trust that sensible comments to the contrary would be made, when there are time constraints, which are huge.  users of the software would be subject to the ramifications of their own invasion, and to date i haven't seen much evidence on this blog that people are willing to stand up to leninist and stalinist garbage sufficiently.  the best i got was a broken statue on the former.   so that means the movements, as evidenced here, stand a good chance of shooting themselves in the foot. 

so i remain outside, put in the odd comment when i can, but at least there is some clarity on some issues.

it's not an enjoyable space to be in.  maybe there's a way i can use my own name for clarity, keep that for my use only, and otherwise participate.  but i'm not sure what the steps are in any case.  do you people just start using eachother's names and, presto?

these are the kinds of questions i've been thinking about.

 

 

 

thanks

and before i forget,

i understand that peoples have migrated. 

for example, while there have been tribes in the region of Ukraine traced back to prehistory, [another contradictory word], um, ok, say, accessible only through archaeological evidence,

these tribes over the centuries welcomed or otherwise integrated with tribes from other regions.  i understand there were people from Iran which crossed the Caucasus mountains and became integral to Ukrainian culture.  And where did those peoples come from ?  India? Africa originally? 

then there is the question of genes.  genes carry over from when who-flung-the-chunk. amoeba-like.  so we can't deny our animal roots.  try doing that on babble and see where it gets you.

and the question of water.  of ions.  of negative and positive charges.  of energy.

so i understand completely the compulsion of people to jump in the pool,and the reality of it.

but at the same time there are threads of continuity, of tendencies, of time and space and necessity, of limits and boundaries.

of conundrums.

and we all find life where we find it.

[i'm waiting for the rain to stop ...looking out the window]

talk later.

hope the three-fifty goes well.

 

 

 

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

rr, I'm still struggling if you have any ideas. There's a local LINUX user's group, of course, but I don't really know if they will help me here.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Check your PM's! ...hope it helps.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Here are some Linux magazines that come in "dead tree" format.   Some of them publish their back issues...say those over six months old are archived on the site.

UK Magazines

Linux Pro

Linux Format

Linux User & Developer

Ubuntu User

U.S. Magazines

Linux Journal

Linux Magazine

 

N.Beltov N.Beltov's picture

Thanks, rr. Problem solved.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Distrowatch is a really great site that tracks all of the latest and greatest GNU/Linux distros.   They have links to reviews, newsletters, podcasts and all kinds of cool stuff!

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Sea Monkey "Web Suite" Version 2.0 has just been released.

You can download the latest version from here

The release notes listing the new features and issues involved in migrating from the old 1.1x versions to 2.0 are here

The internal "guts" of Sea Monkey are now the same as Firefox version 3.5.4

Sea Monkey 2.0 will not work with older versions of Windows like 95,98,ME and NT4.   Also no longer works with old versions of MacOSX (10.3 Panther and 10.2 Jaguar) and if you're on GNU/Linux or Unix you need to have GTK 2.10 or higher installed.

Sea Monkey 2.0 has an "add-on Manager" similar to Firefox so that you can add all kinds of cool "extras".

 

 

Brian White

Anyway, I just took a look and it does contain the composer AND mail/newsgroup applications.  The composer is really useful if you sometimes need to write simple webpages. And right now I do not think there is a decent "what you see is what you get" alternative to it.  I used it to make comparison charts for different solar reflector designs.  (You get 20 or 30 pictures of raw data and seamonkey composer was the only way I could get it coherent and easy to analyze.)

You make your html with seamonkey and drop it in an empty folder.  Then you run your image producing program and output the images to the empty folder.

Then when you open the html file in any webbrowser, the pictures are automatically ordered  and easily compared in the chart.

Brian

radiorahim wrote:

Sea Monkey "Web Suite" Version 2.0 has just been released.

Brian White

Anyone want to give xml editor info?  I think xml replaced html a few years ago and I was not paying attention.  There are a few gpl and some commercial xml editors but I have no clue.

Brian

abnormal

Michelle wrote:

Frozen Bubble is possibly THE most addictive game ever.

If you want to try it online first, click here.

Here's where you download it if you're using Windows.

Try this version - www.bubbleshooter.biz

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