Bless Me Now With Your Fierce Tears XI

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lagatta

Yes, I was referring to mainstream Orthodox, not the Haredi sects I encounter just south of here. What makes me saddest about the latter is how their children are denied an education and now supposedly "homeschooled", when in general the Jewish community has always respected learning, both secular and religious. But I feel just the same about extreme sects in any religion or belief system.

lagatta

People here can express their condolences and thoughts for Cohen and his familly (biological and chosen) at la Grande bibliothèque today and tomorrow. http://montrealgazette.com/news/local-news/leonard-cohen-montrealers-can...

Note that people who can't make it or who live elsewhere can sign the online register here:

http://protocole.gouv.qc.ca/registre

By the way, he's buried at the family plot at the cemetery founded by their historic synagogue, on Mont-Royal.

Some lovely photos of Cohen's Montréal, from Westmount to the old harbour and sailors' church, to the little Parc du Portugal and rue Vallières just east of the Main, with his old and dear friend, the sculptor Armand Vaillancourt - a force of nature, five years older than Cohen and still fighting fit.

http://www.ledevoir.com/culture/actualites-culturelles/484556/une-presti...

sherpa-finn

Evocative imagery lagatta - thanks!  

lagatta

This afternoon, despite the chill, I cycled down to Parc du Portugal to visit the memorial. Not surprisingly, I met several friends and acquaintances. I even ran into the sculptor Armand Vaillancourt, a very old friend of Cohen's (Suzanne Verdal of the song Suzanne was his wife, this must have been 50 years ago). Vaillancourt, whom I do know slightly from groups such as Les Artistes pour la paix, is a force of nature: 5 years older than Cohen was and still going strong. He had just finished and dedicated a very large-scale sculpture, La Force ouvrière, in honour of the late left-wing union leader Michel Chartrand (whom I also knew). There was also an Israeli friend who had moved here, fed up with what Israeli society had become, and some other progressive Israeli emigrants, chatting in Hebrew as well as French and English. The mourners also included Portuguese neighbours who congregate in the park, and a couple of semi-itinerants well known in the area.

Flowers, including a large bouquet of white lilies from le Gouvernement du Québec and offerings from florist creations to the tough remnants of peoples' gardens, Chinese tea in tins along with plates and bags of oranges, song lyrics, drawings etc. People could paint squares like the cobblestones of Parc du Portugal to be hung on a nearby wall, but I really didn't feel like kneeling on cobblestones and undoing all all the good my day's cycling had done for arthritic joints. "Take this waltz" was echoing from a speaker. Some visitors had left full bottles of beer and at least one of red wine, and a mostly empty bottle of Scotch.

 

sherpa-finn

Leonard Cohen was also a visual artist of sorts ... a bit of a scribbler, if you will. Not unlike John Lennon that way.

A few years back while in Montreal for a few days, I discovered that there was an exhibition of a selection of his drawings, - in the gallery above the offices of the Montreal Jazz Festival, if I am not mistaken. I spent a lovely afternoon there. Here is my favourite of his many self-portraits:

A collection of his sketches can be found online here: http://www.hambletongalleries.com/dynamic/artists/Leonard_Cohen_CC_GOQ.asp

And a major exhibition dedicated to his creative life ("There is a crack in everything") will be held at Montreal's Museum of Contemporary Art next Fall, to coincide with the city's 375th anniversary. http://www.macm.org/en/expositions/leonard-cohen/

 

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

I do wish that Leonard and Joni Mitchell had had a kid...just because she'd have rebelled by becoming an office manager.

I took my sister and brother-in-law to see his show in Portland on the last tour.  It was amazing and I know now how very lucky we were to experience that.

And while some raised issues about Dylan getting the Nobel instead of Leonard, I think it was incredibly gracious of ol' Bob to spend much of the last few months paying tribute to Leonard in various interviews.  

 

Unionist

Beautiful posts, everyone!

Sorry I couldn't make it there, lagatta. Anyway, I know "don't mourn, organize!", but I'm still in mourning. Plenty of time to organize later.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

(self-delete.  dupe post.)

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture
lagatta

A post from Outremont writer Mary Soderstrom, with a lovely photo of the gates to Shaar Hashomayim cemetery:

http://marysoderstrom.blogspot.ca/2016/11/saturday-photo-after-very-dark...

Unionist

lagatta wrote:

A post from Outremont writer Mary Soderstrom, with a lovely photo of the gates to Shaar Hashomayim cemetery:

http://marysoderstrom.blogspot.ca/2016/11/saturday-photo-after-very-dark...

Sorry to be picky, lagatta, but that's a different cemetery - Shearith Israel - established by the oldest Sephardic synagogue in town (Spanish and Portuguese synagogue). Shaar Hashomayim is Ashkenazi.

Here's a view of the Cohen family plot at Shaar Hashomayim - I imagine he's buried in one of the as yet unmarked areas:

 

lagatta

Yes, that was her mistake, not mine. She wrote the correct name but got the photo wrong, I guess (I couldn't see the name on my monitor). Are those two cemeteries next to one another? Yes, of course I knew Shaar Hashomayim was Ashkenazi, like Cohen's ancestors.

Here are other interviews, with Christiane Charette, a Radio-Canada host,  the sculptor Armand Vaillancourt (Suzanne's companion way back when) and Martha Wainright

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/emissions/medium_large/2016-2017/chronique.as...

http://www.tvanouvelles.ca/2016/11/11/cet-homme-la-sest-donne-a-lhumanit... Armand Vaillancourt is 87 years old (!) and has just completed and dedicated a monumental sculpture in honour of the leftwing union leader Michel Chartrand, La Force ouvrière.

Unionist

lagatta wrote:

Yes, that was her mistake, not mine. She wrote the correct name but got the photo wrong, I guess (I couldn't see the name on my monitor). Are those two cemeteries next to one another?

Yes - in fact, there are three cemeteries in a row on Chemin de la Forêt - first Shaar Hashomayim, then Spanish and Portuguese, then Cimetière Mont-Royal. I know it was her mistake - I just wanted to note the correction.

The amount of coverage of Leonard Cohen in the local media is amazing and so gratifying. Haven't heard a negative (or barely even an unenthusiastic) word from anyone. Even those who criticize his singing voice seem to love him. 

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

(self-delete.  dupe post)

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Robert Vaughn, last of The Magnificent Seven.

The "Man From UNCLE" says "uncle'.

OK, bad joke.

 

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Leon Russell, age 74.

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/14/arts/music/leon-russell-hit-maker-and-...

Elton John found him, late in life, barely eking out a living touring small towns in the South and Midwest.  Recorded a duet album with Russell called "The  Union".

A musical and instrumental voice that was always there, now stilled.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Janet Wright

We recently watched Corner Gas: The Movie, and in it Wright's character, Emma, was using a scooter (which she did not during the run of the show).  No explanation was offered for this, which was kind of cool.  But it also suggested declining health of some sort.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

I liked her on that show.

sherpa-finn

Missed this news somehow in the past week ... Gwen Ifill died on Monday. Ground breaking journalist who was my Friday night companion for a decade or more, working through the mysteries and absurdities of US politics on PBS's Washington Week. 

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/11/14/business/media/gwen-ifill-dies.html?_r=0

lagatta

Unfortunately, I'd never heard Gwen Ifill when she was alive. Dommage.

An interview with Cantor Gideon Zelermyer, of the Shaar Hashomayim congregation, on Leonard Cohen and making the "Darker" album: http://www.theglobeandmail.com/arts/music/leonard-cohen-remembered-his-r...

He has a splendid voice.

There is a downloadable album of the Cantor and choir, for those of you who enjoy liturgical music: http://www.cdbaby.com/cd/cantorgideonzelermyerthe Funny, I really do, and I'm not remotely religious, in any faith.

People are still singing and lighting candles at little Parc du Portugal. I was riding my bicycle yesterday down to that area (the nearby charity shop Le Chaînon, which supports a refuge for women in crisis - drat, I still didn't find a winter coat, and may wind up buying new from the after-Christmas sales) and two young men from France in a car stopped to ask me for directions to "la maison de Leonard Cohen". I explained them (one-way streets, so they had to go to St-Urbain and then turn on Marie-Anne). I guess I look like a boho of a certain age who'd know that...

Armand Vaillancourt was there again.

lagatta

No doubt. I suspect my two young guys from France might have been continuing down there afterwards. I haven't had time. The house is just a short bicycle ride from my place, and an easy walk, but it takes me a while to get all the way down there and ESPECIALLY to ride uphill back to here.

Notre-Dame de Bon-Secours is also known as "the Sailors' Church" and there are lamp fixtures that are miniature ships made by sailors, probably in thanks to being saved from a storm.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Have people been making pilgrimages to Notre Dame de Bon-Secours, the church Leonard referred to as "Our Lady Of The Harbour" in the song?

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Fidel Castro Ruiz. His brother, and comrade, Raul Castro, speaks on his brother's death ...

Fidel Castro

 

We salute you!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!!

 

Quote:
Fidel Castro, a true legend, has passed away. He is one of the few people to have taken on the US empire, and won. His life has inspired and will continue to inspire revolutions around the world...

 


lagatta

This passing probably deserves its own thread as a historic event. It is late at night here; probably someone will open an appropriate thread when it is morning in Canadian time zones.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Ron Glass.

Shepherd Book, from Firefly, and some other stuff too.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

He was great as the detective and would-be crime novelist "Ron Harris" on Barney Miller, back in the 70s.  That show had a lived-in humanity you don't see much on television now.

bekayne
mark_alfred
lagatta4

Thanks, Mark!

More on Sister Moran:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/toronto/susan-moran-death-1.3906423 Visitation today for any interested people in the GTA.

https://www.thestar.com/news/2007/01/25/true_sister_of_mercy_to_homeless... This article, almost a decade old, also cites Rabble contributor, street nurse Cathy Crowe.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Somehow we neglected to mention Alan Thicke.

I never really watched Growing Pains, but I always enjoyed Thicke of the Night.

Seems he died following an aortic dissection. :0

 

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

I hated Growing Pains and can't say I was ever a big fan of Thicke's but thought he was all right. Then there was his son, Robin Thicke, who put out that rapey hit single, which Alan defended. My estimation of him fell significantly.

That said, though, I like to think the idea of watching his kid grow up would have trumped any feeling that this was a good way to go.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Well, it's true that something he loved precipitated his death, but he evidently died about three hours after the dissection began, so he probably died on a gurney, with an IV in his arm and some cardiac monitor wires stuck to his chest, and probably about when the pain was starting to subside and it was looking like just one of those things. 

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

You're right.  I'll delete the post.  It was meant to be comforting and failed in the attempt.  Sorry. 

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

(self-delete).

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

It does seem odd, given that the doctors knew it was a serious cardiac event, that they didn't rush him into surgery.  As you had occasion to learn, Magoo, seconds count in a situation like that, let alone minutes.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

I read a piece somewhere that suggests that he had been diagnosed and was in or on his way to surgery, but then I've also read articles that say he died of a "heart attack", so who knows?  If I recall correctly, John Ritter died in surgery, but after having had a whole day wasted by a misdiagnosis, and a doctor dropping some pills on him and sending him home (leading to the development and publication of what are now called "Ritter Rules" for differentiating this from a heart attack or other more common heart stuffs.)

I also read something recently suggesting that the target wait time for emergency surgeries in Ontario is two hours, but it seems Thicke waited three (not in ON, and I don't know the whole story, but still).  I waited approximately seven.  Go figure.

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

Every individual case has impossible variables to predict. The overall outcomes dictate the policy. You were very lucky, Magoo, and I'm glad you dodged that bullet!

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

I was just thinking how hard this must be on Thicke's 17yr old son. It would be so hard not to wonder if you had something to do with it.

lagatta4

Very sad news for Russians and music lovers everywhere. A plane carrying the Russian military's official choir, the Alexandrov Ensemble (the famous Red Army Choir in Soviet days) and dancers, musicians and journalists, has crashed into the Black Sea near Sochi:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/dec/25/russian-military-plane-mis...

I put this sad story here, but it can be moved to international news if babblers and mods prefer...

 

lagatta4

Very sad news for Russians and music lovers everywhere. A plane carrying the Russian military's official choir, the Alexandrov Ensemble (the famous Red Army Choir in Soviet days) and dancers, musicians and journalists, has crashed into the Black Sea near Sochi:

https://www.theguardian.com/world/2016/dec/25/russian-military-plane-mis...

I put this sad story here, but it can be moved to international news if babblers and mods prefer...

 

6079_Smith_W

That is terrible news

And terrible how many musicians wind up going that way, en route to a gig.

 

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

The Duran: The tragic loss of the Alexandrov Choir

 

Adam Garrie wrote:
All but three members of Russia's most beloved vocal ensemble have died in the tragic plane crash.

Today’s news of the Tupolev-154 crash is personally devastating. Of the 92 souls on board, the vast majority were members of the Alexandrov Choir, colloquially known  as the Red Army Choir. The rest were civilian journalists and charity workers, including Elizaveta Glinka who has worked tirelessly to help the children of Donbass whilst the west lets them starve.

The Alexandrov Choir were en route to Syria to perform for the troops and civilians as they have done in every major conflict abroad since Alexander Alexandov formed the ensemble in 1926. The choir’s music helped comfort civilians and entertain soldiers during The Great Patriotic War. They provided the soundtrack for the most harrowing years in all of Russian history. Many of the most beloved songs composed during the war were by Alexander Alexandrov, including my personal favourite The Sacred War.

Perhaps most enduring was Alexandrov’s composition of the Soviet Anthem whose music is used as the current anthem of the Russian Federation. Few people in the world have not heard the basses, baritones and tenors of the choir. The signature sound was unlike anything in the world. The instrumentalists of the ensemble were equally talented playing a mixture of orchestral instruments, folk instruments and modern pop instruments....

Today’s loss is a colossal blow for Russian culture. The choir will continue, it will have to be re-built from the ground up, but the voices silenced in the plane crash will continue to haunt many.

May God rest the souls of all those lost in this terrible tragedy.

The Duran story has a link to a YouTube video of the choir.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

A great loss.

lagatta4

It would be good if we could find some representative concerts, tributes etc. Thrilling voices: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=lOfvkmJ7AR0

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

George Michael, age 53....

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-38432862

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

What a brutal year.

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

Ken Burch wrote:

George Michael, age 53....

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-38432862


*sob*

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

lagatta4 wrote:
It would be good if we could find some representative concerts, tributes etc.

Try YouTube or Google with "АЛЕКСАНДРОВ хор". You'll find lots.

Today, December 26, is a National Day of Mourning in Russia for the victims of the Tu-154 passenger jet tragedy.

See "Russia mourns victims," etc.

RBTH wrote:
Russia is observing on Dec. 26 a nationwide day of mourning in remembrance of 92 people, who died in a passenger aircraft crash near the resort city of Sochi in the early hours of Dec. 25.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

The CBC radio coverage regarding the Sochi plane crash had a very creepy, voyeuristic feeling to it. I could almost hear the lip-smacking pleasure of the reporter. It was quite obscene. Breathless narration. Blechh. Emphasis on Orthodox services, prayer, the military aircraft (that transported the musicians, ballerinas, humanitarian workers, journalists and crew), and, oh yes, the National Day of Mourning, mentioned almost casually, at the very end of the "report" ...

Thanks CBC. Fuck you and die.

6079_Smith_W

I know ikosmos, it doesn't feel good to hear people cheering about other people being slaughtered,

... or even imagining that people might be doing so.

It is the kind of sentiment that really has no place in public discourse.

 

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