Hey good lookin', what's cookin'?

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Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Wasabi peanuts aren't????

progressive17 progressive17's picture

I've found mixing parsely up with mint and coriander is quite tasty in a given recipe, like tabouli salad for example.

WWWTT

lagatta4 wrote:

Parsley is exotic????

lol sorry lagatta4 yes for now too much fresh parsley I believe is a little over the top for my little ones. My eldest son is 4 and the boy/girl twins are 2. But they will eventually develop a taste for different flavours! My wife is Chinese so there’s a lot of different foods flavours being eaten in my house. 

WWWTT

progressive17 wrote:

I've found mixing parsely up with mint and coriander is quite tasty in a given recipe, like tabouli salad for example.

this sounds like something I can grow in the garden myself and make!  I put it in my notes for when the time comes around I will try it for myself at least and not the whole family thanks

lagatta4

On a whim, I bought two LARGE turkey thighs at a local poulterer. I'd like to marinate them. Could white wine vinegar go into the marinade, or would that be too sharp? I have some leftover white wine too, but that seems a bit too mild on its own. Of course I also have olive oil, fish and soya sauces, and various herbs and spices. Piri piri?

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Wine vinegar would be fine in a brine.  Dunno about a more concentrated marinade -- I'd be afraid of too much vinegar making the meat sloppy if left to pickle for too long.  But google "turkey brining vinegar" for lots of ideas.

progressive17 progressive17's picture

Where is that poulterer? Do they have decent prices? I find the prices for poultry at the Jean Talon market to be somewhat outrageous...

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Britain gets seedless avocados to prevent knife injuries

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This month, the British retailer Marks & Spencer has introduced a safer avocado, or at least one that’s seedless. These pint-sized avocados, also known as cocktail avocados, are grown in Spain and are only about 2 to 3 inches long. And because there’s no pit, there’s no need for a sharp knife to hack it out.

That matters to doctors in the UK, where the medical community began referring to the gashes one gets when the seed removal goes wrong as “avocado hand.”

Really?  It's a seed the size of a golf ball, encased in soft fruit.

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Nerves and tendons were being slashed with such frequency that the British Association of Plastic, Reconstructive and Aesthetic Surgeons warned people about the safety risk, and one doctor even suggested avocados carry safety labels, according to the San Francisco Chronicle.

Warning:  do not attempt to remove avocado pit if you're stupid or totally wasted.  Better that you just eat that pit, for safety reasons.

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

I have never injured myself pitting an avocado. Trying to figure out how to go about it. 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

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And because there’s no pit, there’s no need for a sharp knife to hack it out.

Well, TB, maybe you're just not HACKING it out.  With a sharp knife.

FWIW, I'm familiar with the trick of halving the avocado, then holding the half that still has the pit and giving the pit a light tap with a knife, and then a twist.  But it never occurred to me that I should need to really lean into it, or follow through.

lagatta4

Zinman's. Yes, a bit expensive, but it is hard to find turkey thighs. It is remarkably hard to find turkey parts in general.

Epicurous (US site) also has an annoying video about people unable to open an avocado. A false problem.

progressive17 progressive17's picture

lagatta4 wrote:

Zinman's. Yes, a bit expensive, but it is hard to find turkey thighs. It is remarkably hard to find turkey parts in general.

Epicurous (US site) also has an annoying video about people unable to open an avocado. A false problem.

Thank you very much lagatta4! 

I am going to try to make confit turkey sometime soon...

lagatta4

When Al Khair (the Moroccan place just east of the market) Jean-Talon and Henri-Julien - has turkey parts, they are excellent, but they have drumsticks more often than thighs. Just as tasty, but hell dealing with the little shin bones, especially if there are children or elders who have trouble dealing with them.

You can find cheap poultry very close to there at Marché Africa (St-Denis and Jean-Talon, just north of Marché Oriental, and some on the west side of that corner, at the southeast asian grocery there, forget its name.

The cheapest place as far as I know for poultry parts is Iasenza, on Bélanger just east of St-Michel. http://www.iasenza.com/index.html  Not the same choice or quality as Zinman, but I certainly shop there, especially when there is no snow. It is pretty much due east from where I live and easy to cycle there.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Last week my local No-Frills had ducks on sale -- not even listed in the flyer -- and I got a 2kg young duck for about $6.75!  Quite a deal, and I'm kicking myself for not picking up two.

So, on Xmas day, we had Peking Duck.  It's a bit tedious, but not all that hard to do, and the result is awesome.  Basically:

- make a hot "broth" of equal parts of the classic "five spice" mix:  some cinnamon sticks, some cloves, fennel, star anise and Szechuan peppercorns

- hang (and hold) the duck by a hook, and ladle the broth over the duck, making sure to get it everywhere

- hang the duck to dry for an hour or so

- repeat the basting and drying until you've no more patience for it

- hang the duck to dry one last time

- make a glaze from some of the "broth", honey (or brown sugar or maltose) and some soy

- roast the duck @400F, basting with the glaze about every half hour, watching to make sure the glaze doesn't burn

That's about it.  Nice, crispy, duck-fatty skin, tender meat.  Serve traditionally with Chinese pancakes (more like a tortilla) and green onion, or with rice and a veg, or however you like a very Asian duck.

Quack!

I used some of the leftovers (some meat, all the bones) for duck dumplings (the meat) in soup (the bones).  Sort of a heartier version of wonton soup.

I still have the drums and most of the wings, so I'm thinking of making a very improv'd cassoulet with them.  If it's good then that's three different meals from a bird that set me back less than seven bucks.

Also, I made these, and highly recommend them.  They're super easy, and I suspect you could even make them in a toaster oven.

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

Nice! It's been a while since I've done Peking duck! I did goose with Madiera and orange sauce for Xmas dinner for 10 of us! Two geese, actually. With creme caramel and /or panna cotta for desert.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

I could be wrong, but I feel like this might be a holiday tradition in this thread.

1. you mention cooking a goose

2. I say how jelly I am that you got to cook a goose, and maybe go off on a tangent about cooking for two

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Two geese, actually.

FML.

The duck cassoulet worked out well, tho.  We got in some "bill to tail" eating on that cheap duck.  I went back to NF, hoping they'd still have some, but they didn't.  I got a $5 chicken instead, brining for tomorrow.  But it was only after I bought just one duck that I realized that if I'd bought another, I could try making confit.

lagatta4

IGA has the $2lb duck sale again. I'll probably buy one; I didn't before Christmas as I'd bought two large turkey thighs and that was more than enough meat for me for a week. The duck would be too, and of course provides a splendid soup carcass and some lovely duck fat. I don't have a full-size stove, so I'll have to braise it, which is fine.

They are $6 now at Fruiterie Milano.

Panettoni have started to go on sale. There is one from Maina that has NO fruit (and is less sweet than a pandoro) and is meant to be used as a base for canapés etc.

http://www.bellaitaliafoodstore.com/maina-gran-chef-panettone-gastronomi... The description on this website (not the Maina one) claims that it has NO sugar, which is untrue. It contains 7 grammes, and is probably very slightly sweet as brioche often is.

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

Magoo, I keep doing goose every year because the family demands it! But it was nice introducing my friends' preteens to something new. 

The he duck cassoulet sounds amazing. We had duck sausage from the butcher shop nearby with poached eggs for brunch yesterday. Seems like duck is in vogue this year. 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

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Magoo, I keep doing goose every year because the family demands it! But it was nice introducing my friends' preteens to something new.

Good enough reason.  I'd demand it too!

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The duck cassoulet sounds amazing.

I can't complain.  I was initially regretting having used the duck frame for the stock that I used for the dumplings, but then I remembered that I had a few chicken thigh bones in the freezer, and for some reason had saved the duck wings -- a meagre banquet if ever there was one -- so I used them all to make the stock for the cassoulet, and I still had the drums to throw in for meat, along with a piece of smoked slab bacon from a Portuguese butcher.

Also, ALL my bean dishes that call for a plain white bean got a "level up" when I switched from navies and haricots to Great Northerns.  You wouldn't think that a bean that's the same size, shape and colour could be a game changer, but they really are. 

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Seems like duck is in vogue this year.

The first good news for 2018.  Bring it.

Tomorrow I plan to make some stock from the frame of today's chicken, so that the next day I can make some chicken congee.  My wife's workplace recently had a nice holiday lunch at a good Dim Sum place, and I had proper congee for the first time and now I really, really need to make some.  Also, I had some chicken feet.

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

Huh, I thought they were pretty much the same bean. Will have to do a comparison!

did a small beef roast with Yorkshire pudding for the 3 of us at home. Thing 1 is off ringing in the new year with her beau. Butter chicken marinating for tomorrow. 

Happy new year, darlings!

lagatta4

Time flies, eh?

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

I assume you're referring to TB's daughter being all growed up now?  Or maybe just that it's 2018 now?

Anyway, spending this frozen day indoors, making up some chicken stock from yesterday's bones, and trying to decide what to do with a simmering steak I got on sale.  Chinese beef noodle soup is what I usually do, but I'm also thinking of maybe a riff on burritos that would use up some cooked beans I've got.

I think I'm also going to make this.  I'll probably sub in some more flour for the almond meal, even though that's awesome, because for some reason almond meal is super expensive these days -- probably a California drought thing, or inflation, or both -- and anyway, I don't have any and nothing is open today.  I've made this without almond before, and it's still awesome.  I might go with a drop or two of almond extract though, for fun.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Kim Jong Un obsessed with scientific kimchi-making

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On the outskirts of Pyongyang, surrounded by snow-covered farms and greenhouses, stands one of Kim’s latest pet projects, the Ryugyong Kimchi Factory, which produces 4,200 tons of the iconic Korean pickled vegetable dish a year. The shiny new facility replaces an older factory and opened in June last year after getting Kim’s final seal of approval, according to manager Paek Mi Hye.

I wasn't sure whether to put this in the North Korea thread or here.  :)

Nothing wrong with taking a modern approach to kimchi.  Like many North Americans (I'm guessing) the first I ever heard of kimchi was from watching M*A*S*H, when Frank dug up some kimchi crocks and thought they were bombs, but it's not stoneware pots buried by the shed any more.  Some Koreans actually buy dedicated kimchi fridges, most of which will have a fermentation program that maintains optimum temperature for lactofermentation, then drops the temperature for optimum storage when it's done.  Deluxe models will even have several compartments, so one can be fermenting, one can be storing, etc.  And if nothing else, I suppose it fixes the issue of your regular fridge smelling like a landfill for a few days. 

This year for Xmas, Mrs. M. gave me a sweet book on fermentation -- fruits, veggies, meats, fish, everything -- so it's a safe bet that I'll be letting stuff "rot" for most of 2018.  I've got a litre of sauerkraut on the go on my countertop (started before the book), and I recently made some fermented hot sauce, but any new thing gets me curious.

lagatta4

I'm cooking some beluga lentils I turned up. Sounds like a marketing term, claiming the small black lentils look like beluga caviar. They are probably the same or similar to the black dhal (usually split) that one sees in some South Asian cuisines. Except for making a cooking broth from scraps of vegetables I had frozen (usually to add to poultry stock) and making a brunoise, they will be fairly plain as I want to make a salad from them and some greens, perhaps a bit of feta.

I made some more curtido, with red cabbage this time. It is less pickled and fermented than sauerkraut or kimchi, but keeps far better than a fresh cabbage slaw.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Did you get the beluga lentils at Bulk Barn?

Because I once got some at Bulk Barn.  And ya, I think they got their name from being little round black things.  Surely other cultures have less evocative names for them (black lentils springs to mind).

They were good enough, for sure, but I still favour Moong Dal (split and hulled mung beans) for most of my lentil stuff, becaue they cook down to a tender slurry before you can even rinse the spoon.

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I made some more curtido, with red cabbage this time. It is less pickled and fermented than sauerkraut or kimchi, but keeps far better than a fresh cabbage slaw.

And should you ever forget some in the north-west corner of the bottom shelf of the fridge, it can be exactly as pickled and fermented as sauerkraut or kimchi (though, to be fair, kimchi has a huge head start from the fish sauce).

I've currently got on my countertop some sauerkraut (about six months?), some fermented chard stems (four?) and some kosher dills (about two and a half).  All good for you, and very digestible (once the Lactobacilli do the heavy lifting).  Knowing how easy they all are to make, I do sometimes wonder about "probiotic" pills, the same way that when I grill up some salmon and savour the skin I wonder about "fish oil" capsules, or "omega fatty acid" supplements.

lagatta4

Yes, different concentrations of the same stuff. But I did take biok plus after my UTI, also because I had zero appetite and food disgusted me.

There is a Bulk Barn somewhere in the Mtl area, but very far from where I live. If I recall, I just bought a plastic bag of lentils (and black beans) at a shop where they were cheap. Probably at Pa in Mile End, just south of me

progressive17 progressive17's picture

Bulk Barn is not such a great deal, except on a few items like plain peanuts. It is a bit of a scam. Maxi is generally better. However it is up by Acadie and Hwy. 40 in that huge Toronto-ized mall-thing where the car-texters go.

lagatta4

Do you mean Marché central? I don't recall a Maxi there. They are all in places with a lot of cars where it isn't very safe to cycle. The closest one to me (Papineau and Jarry) is a horror to get to. The one on Jean-Talon just east of Pie-IX  a bit better, because I can take the cycle path on St-Zotique. I leave my bicycle locked at le Centre Boulevard (a small shopping centre) and just walk across Jean-Talon.

I find some "ethnic" shops, especially Middle Eastern, are better for nuts than Maxi is. But Adonis has become far more expensive than it used to be, since it was taken over by Métro.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

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Bulk Barn is not such a great deal, except on a few items like plain peanuts.

Sadly true.  Though I do appreciate their typically diverse selection of stuff, and being able to buy as little of something as I want.   If I'm eager to try (let's say) a recipe that calls for a bit of chickpea flour, I don't necessarily want to buy a five pound bag at the supermarket.

lagatta4

South Asian shops for chickpea flour. That is the besan type. The Medterranean type will be found in Italian, Greek, Lebanese etc shops. Actually, I find chickpea flour useful, to make crêpes.  They need not be spicy ones. Full of protein

progressive17 progressive17's picture

Yeah the Maxi was the one on CDN, which I can get to fairly easily by taking the Jean Talon bus and walking under the bridge.

lagatta4

There is also a good Southeast Asian supermarket on the other side of CDN. http://kimphat.com/circulaire/ About the largest and most varied in the Mtl area (at least on the island -  I have no way of getting to Brossard) is Marché Hawaï, but the better one is in Ville St-Laurent and not close to a métro station there so it takes me forever to get there. I discovered Indonesian food in the Netherlands and Hawaï has the best selection of products for that, among other things. There is one in St-Léonard that I can cycle to, but it isn't as large and well-stocked.

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