Hey good lookin', what's cookin'?

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lagatta

I've never seen such a GOOSE in our little Chinatown. I know what I'd be doing if I were inviting friends anytime during the Solstice-Christmas-New Year's holiday season, if I lived in Toronto.

This Guardian story about a Perón-Perón café mentioned an Argentine version of shepherd's (or cottage) pie. I've also had the same thing made by friends from Chile, so I guess it is the whole Southern Cone.

http://www.theguardian.com/travel/2015/nov/08/peron-peron-resto-bar-buen...

I posted the first version I found. It's in (simple) Spanish, but running it through Google translate will make it understandable and save me unwelcome free work: http://recetasdeargentina.com.ar/pastel-de-papas

About the only instruction it failed to translate was descarozar, (to stone or pit fruit).

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Oldgoat mentioned food in another thread, and it did get me to thinking that the Holiday season should have at least one or two reasons to mention food in some way.  That said, I haven't really had any food epiphanies lately.

I did, however, make this today:  The Fanny Farmer Dark Fruitcake.  My wife LOVES Christmas fruitcake, and demands at least one every year -- homemade, store-bought, whatever.

No idea how it turned out -- it's still cooling, and I haven't yet brandied it up.  I cut the recipe in half (because I only have the one loaf pan, and there's only the two of us) but I promised her that if this one turns out good I'll make a second and top it with this.  I've made it before, and it's glorious (and easy). 

And FWIW, I totally get that many people don't really care for fruitcake.  What's more, I totally get that fruitcake is the unloved, unwanted butt of many a Holiday joke.  But evidently all kinds of cultures have their own version of fruitcake -- some sort of "festive occasion" "treat" that people exchange, but don't actually like.  If you're Chinese, it's Moon Cake.  If you're Italian it's Pannetone.  If you're Muslim it's "Laddu".  Typical me, I kind of like Moon Cake (even with that hardboiled egg in there) and I kind of like Laddu, too.  Pannetone I might like if I were to ever try some that wasn't stale and dry.  Which could just mean buying one before it's on sale.

Oh, and in the spirit of the season I also made this.  So who needs food anyway?  As my father used to say "Never spoil a million dollar drunk with a ten cent meal".

 

lagatta

There are a couple of places here in Mtl that make their own panettone.  There must be some in Toronto! If you buy a commercial one, make sure that it is made with butter and not some mystery fat. The fewer ingredients (except for raisins, candied fruit etc.) the better. Tre Marie is a decent "commercial" one. Now if you get a slightly stale one on sale, don't just cut it up and serve it. There are two basic things to do with it then 1) toast it, and serve with butter and 2) make a luxe version of French Toast or bread pudding. It will be fine.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

I get that this is totally not what you're recommending, but I'm thinking "wait until they're on sale for $2, then French Toast for miles!  Aw yiss!!".

lagatta

No, not at all. Just that there are tasty things you can make with panettoni that are a bit dry. When they hit $2 it is probably too late.

I saw Tre Marie (a decent, all-butter commercial brand) at Pharmaprix here (Shoppers to you) for about $11. I haven't bought one yet; I don't know whether I'm having any guests over. I'm not doing anything much for that nasty holiday.

6079_Smith_W

Regarding fruitcake, I think part of the problem is that it isn't meant to be wolfed down like a fluffy birthday cake. One of the more palatable forms - stollen - is actually meant to be buttered like bread before you eat it. As for the English version, I think six months soaking in rum probably helps.

Made some mincemeat this last week. Took awhile to find suet, and I wound up having to candy my own orange peels, but the result was very nice.

 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

I made some mincemeat a couple of years ago -- my wife loves all Xmas stuff -- and also had to hunt around a bit for the suet.  I imagine that suet was a staple of the neighbourhood butcher shop thirty years ago, but I got a lot of shrugs when I asked around, and eventually found some at St. Lawrence Market.  Worked out well, as I recall.  I think I used some Buddha's Hand that I'd candied, and some raisins that had been soaking in rum for literally several years.

Today is brandy day for the fruitcake.  It looks right.  It smells right.  Fingers crossed.

Timebandit

I'm drooling over the fruitcake, Magoo! I love dark fruitcake, but you can never find the good stuff in stores.  My mum makes good fruitcake, but I'm on the naughty list for not coming back to Saskatchewan, so I likely won't see any this year.  Might have to make my own - but you start in July and leave it soak in rum for a few months and I'm not that organized these days.

I've settled on my menus for Christmas Eve and Christmas Day - Goose with madiera and oranges and salmon stuffed with fennel and tomato, respectively. 

 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Why can't someone breed a "Cornish Game Goose" -- a goose, but a li'l one that clocks in at about three pounds?  When you're cooking for two, a goose makes as much sense as full leg of lamb, or an 8 pound brisket.

I've only cooked one once, when I was 23 and lived in Hamilton in a tiny little one-bedroom and hosted a winter dinner party.  I had a "mini" stove (it was about 20" wide) and there was just enough room in the wee oven for a goose, and a vegetarian lasagna.  Turned out good, but I like to think I'd do it better now.

Enjoy that goose, and don't forget to save that fat.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Oh, I've also got to give a quick plug to that mulled wine recipe.  I made it pretty much as Jamie did, except that I used one dry bay leaf instead of three fresh ones, and I added a couple of cardmom pods because why not?  Also, instead of dumping in a couple of bottles of wine once the syrup was made, I just poured the syrup into a pint jar.  Now, when my wife craves a mulled wine, I just have to put a couple of tablespoons of the syrup in a mug, add some hot wine, and "ho ho ho".  Could not be easier.

6079_Smith_W

Can you get mulled wine teabags here? It isn't one of my favourite things, but I have seen them.

Still on the fruitcake tangent, this is what the other half of that lump of suet is destined for:

http://dangerousminds.net/comments/george_orwells_recipe_for_christmas_p...

(though I would have thought almonds were hard to find in Britain during the war)

 

 

 

Timebandit

Magoo, we love goose for christmas.  I wanted to change things up this year, but the wild girls lobbied hard for the goose. Not that I mind, it's a lovely recipe. (I always save the fat!)

I suppose you could sub in duck for the goose, but it isn't quite the same.

I was in Vienna for a conference a couple of weeks ago and the big thing in the christmas markets is "glühwein" or mulled wine.  It was so tasty and warming. So you sightsee a little while, grab a mug at the outdoor market, do a little shopping, get another on the way out... :)

http://www.chowhound.com/recipes/german-mulled-wine-gluhwein-30925

 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

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Still on the fruitcake tangent, this is what the other half of that lump of suet is destined for

Looks good.  Who can't love a recipe whose final step is "and set fire to it"?

Do you have a good lead on the two different types of almonds?  I didn't even know there is two.

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I suppose you could sub in duck for the goose, but it isn't quite the same.

Sadly, not quite.  Though even if there did exist a wee goose, my wife might veto it as she most often does duck.

I did consider the possibility of roasting up a silkie this year, just to do something different.  Find 'em all over Chinatown, at a slightly premium price.  They kind of look like a regular chicken with argyria.

[IMG]http://i67.tinypic.com/19t6bs.jpg[/IMG]

Well, change of plan.  I guess they're not really roasters.  Pretty funky to look at, though.

6079_Smith_W

Thanks to Big Brother looking out for us, it has gone the way of laudanum drops, real marmite, and real tiger balm.

From wikipedia:

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All commercially grown almonds sold as food in the United States are of the "sweet" variety. The US Food and Drug Administration reported in 2010 that some fractions of imported sweet almonds were contaminated with bitter almonds. Eating such almonds could result in vertigo and other typical bitter almond (cyanide) poisoning effects.[38]
Certain natural food stores sell "bitter almonds" or "apricot kernels" labeled as such, requiring significant caution by consumers for how to prepare and eat these products

If I wanted to try to fudge it, I might try acorns. I have made bird stuffing with the sweet kind, but depending on the species, some of them can be really bitter.

Or perhaps, as wikipedia suggests, an apricot kernel might be better.

 

pookie

There are only four of us, and I am not in my own kitchen.  So I have decided to ditch the traditional Christmas menu and instead offer filet mignon, potatoes cooked in duck fat and glazed carrots.  Plus a small cake from a bakery.  

It is most definitely not cheaper, but can be on the table in 45 minutes.

Tomorrow I will make Belgian waffles with raspberries for breakfast, and gourmet tourtiere (bought from the same obscenely expensive Toronto butcher which supplied the steaks).

 

Unionist

We had leftovers. Me: Pork scallopini. She: Confit de canard.

And we're toasting our planet and humanity!

And we're toasting... oh I said that.

Does this mean we go to hell??

 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

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There are only four of us, and I am not in my own kitchen.  So I have decided to ditch the traditional Christmas menu

Sounds good.  Maybe it'll be a new tradition.

One year -- at least 20 years ago -- Mrs. Magoo and I had somehow not planned ahead for dinner on Xmas day (too tired?  no ideas?  I forget why) and so we decided to go for some Chinese.  We got out the phone book (that was how people looked up telephone numbers back then) and found a place nearby in Hamilton that was open on Christmas day.  So, szechuan Xmas.

Most years I try to accomodate my wife's Christmas traditions which include celebrating Christmas eve moreso than Christmas day (so we always unwrap one present and get one reach into the stocking on Xmas eve) and also vetivorst for dinner on the eve.  Vetivorst is Estonian blood sausage, made with barley and marjoram.  And... well, blood.  The first few times we just bought Spanish morcillas and made the best of it, but the last few years we've boiled up the barley, soaked the casings and made our own.  It's a pretty easy sausage to make, not needing a grinder or packer or anything much more than a funnel, but as one recipe I saw pointed out, it's made with blood, and blood stains things like clothing pretty good, and of course when it's your first time making it and you're all left hands and thumbs, by the time you're done your kitchen looks like a crime scene.  But it's pretty tasty stuff.  Try it on your kids.

This year we didn't do it, so tonight it's ribeye, orzo with mushrooms and some choi sum.  Sorry, Martha Stewart.

pookie

Unionist wrote:

 

Does this mean we go to hell??

 

Yes.

pookie

Honestly, I think non-traditional foods are more delicious anyway.  Like fettucine alfredo, or a lamb curry.

For some reason people think of those things for NYE, not Christmas.

bagkitty bagkitty's picture

Thank the flying spaghetti monster that is over... baking 10 dozen almond cookies, 5 dozen gingerbread persons (they have no genitals so I can't tell), 7 dozen birdnest cookies and 5 dozen shortbread cookies. 'Tis the season to feel guilty... and baking is the best way I know of saying thank you to those wonderful neighbours of mine who make the snow magically disappear from my assigned stretch of walkway and stairs when I don't get out first thing in the morning. Now I am going to go munch on a piece of venison jerkey (one of my wonderful neighbours had a haunch from one of the deer he got this hunting season turned into jerky at Longview* and I shared with me... I have been doling it out a piece at a time, YUM!).

--------------------

* Longview Alberta, the most appropriately named place in Canada (picture is taken from the northern limit of the village looking south)

 

view from 1km north of town

lagatta

pookie, I'm sure it was cheaper and less stressful than a restaurant. It is always more expensive when one is far from one's kitchen and usual suppliers. I'm not making a tourtière this year, at least not so far. I usually make a duck one, but have had too many travails. Just a seafood rice, like a cheat paella, though I have been grinding the saffron and other spices in a mortar and pestle: saffron threads, a bit of smoked pimentón and a smidgen of turmeric... too much makes it bitter and kills the saffron. Soaking in a tablespoon or so of white wine, in a 125 ml (tiny) mason jar in the fridge. I'll also do a base of onion, garlic and a bit of sweet red pepper.

Too bad your butcher is so pricy. I'm sure Magoo and some other GTA babblers could find you good but cheaper sources. Next week I'm buying a three-litre metal container of Greek extra-virgin olive oil ($15) and lugging it home. Good to have supplies if it gets hard to carry stuff, with snow and cold.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

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Too bad your butcher is so pricy. I'm sure Magoo and some other GTA babblers could find you good but cheaper sources.

Beef has definitely gone way up in price here too.  Maybe still better than some other places, but I'm not so sure about that.  That said, the ribeye that I'll be cooking up came from Chinatown, where it's usually sold in 1.5-2.5 lb hunks for about $5.79/lb, or something close.  You can slice it into steaks of your liking (as tonight) but if you remove the ribeye "stuff" (some tendon, some silverskin) and tie it off then it also makes a good small roast.

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Next week I'm buying a three-litre metal container of Greek extra-virgin olive oil ($15) and lugging it home.

Nice.  A six month supply for you; a 3 week supply for a Greek.  :)

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in a 125 ml (tiny) mason jar

Fun Food Fact:  that's a salmon jar.

I recently found about a dozen of them, discarded, along with some rings, and some pint jars.  Lord knows I've bought Mason jars too, but at least half of my hundreds have been foundlings.

lagatta

6-month,no. More like 3-month. I make even crusts for savoury pies with olive oil; I use very little butter. Non-olive oil is for Asian cooking. If I had more money (if only!) I'd buy two.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

I guess that only works out to about a cup a week.

I'm sure most North Americans eat at least a cup of fats and oils a week, and probably for the most part hydrogenated coconut oil or some other worse thing.

I'm currently out of sesame oil.  I looked at the bottle -- not the small one -- and wondered "didn't I JUST buy a big bottle of this?  I guess the answer is "yes, and there's the bottle".

pookie

Oh definitely, lagatta.  What I just cooked for us would have been $400 in a restaurant.  Easily.

Yes I could have gotten the meat more cheaply.  But we are downtown, I had limited time and am not familiar/comfortable with Chinatown butchers and was absolutely unwilling to drive today.  

So...Queen St W for me. 

 

6079_Smith_W

Coconut is my go-to frying oil. That or lard or peanut.

You aren't going to deep fry anything in olive oil, after all.

Oh... fondue at our house tonight, A cheese one, and a chocolate one.

 

bagkitty bagkitty's picture

@6079 - I know they produce lard in Canada (even if it violates dietary laws for Jews, Muslims and the vegan crowd), but coconut oil and peanut oil... not so much. Try Canola.

6079_Smith_W

I use lard from bacon, not the store stuff, except for pastry. I'm not a big fan of the canola industry, so I avoid using it. If I was to use something local, and I do on occasion, it would be sunflower .

But considering I drink coffee and eat oranges which come from someplace else, I have no problem using coconut and peanut.

lagatta

I have a very good less-refined sunflower oil that tastes ... like sunflower seeds. However, like extra-virgin olive oil, it can't be used for high-heat frying (either deep or wok-type). I have cheaper sunflower oil for the wok.

I do sautée with olive oil (not a very expensive one) as I'd sautée with butter - not at a high heat.

I utterly loathe canola oil. Not everyone gets the "rotten-fish" aftertaste, but I do. Odd, as I like fish sauce that acutally is made with fermented fish.

 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

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Yes I could have gotten the meat more cheaply.  But we are downtown, I had limited time and am not familiar/comfortable with Chinatown butchers and was absolutely unwilling to drive today. 

Best you didn't.  You wouldn't get filet in Chinatown.

It's actually kind of interesting to me how different cuisines butcher meat.  Chinatown is full of big cuts like ribs and backs and ribeye (sold as a hunk, not a steak) and pork butt and gnarlier things like oxtail.  Little Portugal favours big cuts too, lots of strangely big, flat pot roasts and such, but also lots of much smaller "scallopini" type cuts.  And my closest butcher is, like many Canadian butchers, all about the "popular" cuts -- Sirloin steaks, t-bones and striploins, butterflied pork chops and so on.  Sadly, never any of the more fancy cuts like a flatiron or a bavette -- for that I need to go to Kensington and pay Sanagan's prices. 

All the same animals, but totally different prep.

lagatta

I certainly don't use a cup of olive oil a week in day-to-day cooking. I measure everything; oil into littlle glass prep bowls. I use more oil when I'm doing projects such as foccaccia/fougasse, savoury tarts and pies and similar stuff, not all of which is eaten by me, then the use goes up.

pookie, your choices were definitely wise. I hope you had a lovely time.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

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I use lard from bacon, not the store stuff, except for pastry.

If you want to use bacon lard for pastry, reduce the salt by 300%.

I always have a small bowl of bacon drippings in the fridge.  When I want to fry up some hashbrowns (or whatever), I take some out.  When I cook some bacon I put some in.  It's pretty "old school", I suppose, but sometimes it's just the right thing. 

mark_alfred

I ran outta rice, so I made stir fried pearled barley with vegetables and hot sauce.  Not bad, actually.  The pearled barley was like pudgy rice.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Barley:  It's not just for beer any more.

lagatta

It never was just for beer. But of course, it is also for beer! Barley is also great in soup.

Does anyone like to cook buckwheat? I bought something (on sale) called "white buckwheat" - think it is the same thing as kasha but not toasted yet. I'll probably toast it.

I've been lucky to find some decent green vegetables and eggplant on sale. The price of greens is just terrifying, and even the price of a lot of stuff grown or produced in Canada has risen terribly.

I was so happy to have bought a three-litre jug of Greek olive oil for $15 - I bought two, actually, one for a neighbour, who reimbursed me. So happy not to have to worry about that during the winter.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

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The price of greens is just terrifying, and even the price of a lot of stuff grown or produced in Canada has risen terribly.

Boy howdy.  I had the intention of picking up some decent vegetable for a side dish the other day, and mine eye fell upon some green beans at Metro.  But when I got closer, I saw that they were 3.99/lb.  Not on my watch.

Today I kind of wanted some kind of reasonable tomato.  Metro had them for the same price - 3.99/lb -- and one of my local vegetable shacks had them for the same price, only they were uglier, and my go-to local vegetable place had them for between 2.99 and 3.99/lb, only every single tomato they had for sale was a sad, pale orange.  Not even as rich and deep as "pumpkin" orange. 

I get that the loonie is down, but it's not THIS down.  And I know it's mid-winter, and I know that I shouldn't expect fruits and vegetables to be priced to move, but when did it get this bad?

On the good side, though, one of my local Asian groceries had mushroom on sale -- a big ol' tray of them for a buck.  So tonight's  cream of mushroom soup was glorious.

mark_alfred

Mmm, cream of mushroom soup.  Mushroom and barley soup is good too. 

Speaking of barley, I occasionally enjoy barley coffee (aka roasted grain beverage).  You usually find it in European sections of grocery stores (or at Honest Ed's in Toronto).

lagatta

I've always found the Asian groceries have something. Yes, when the loonie was down before it never had such an impact. I try not to buy "fresh" tomatoes in the winter, though it is always tempting to make a taboulé. At some places parsley is still $1 a bunch, and that is rich in vitamins. This mini-chain (3 stores, one not far in Mile-End (a couple of blocks south of the railway viaduct) http://supermarchepa.com/ always has some decent bargains. They are Greek, so they have goat and ewe's cheeses... I'll look at their Roma tomatoes, for taboulé, but doubt I'll find them inspiring.

I like barley coffee as a hot beverage, but need my hit of caffeine in the morning. Going back to bed now... Something woke me up.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Roma tomatoes @ $1.39/lb?  I'd have been all over that.  Mind you, the flyer probably should have said "Photograph for entertainment purposes only".

All I wanted was one or two non-pulpy, not-rock-hard tomatoes for a couple of BLTs.  I mean, we can put a man on the moon...

lagatta

I'll check them out tomorrow. They certainly won't be the pretty deep orangey-red of the photo in the flyer, but I just hope they aren't little rocks.

lagatta

The Romas really didn't appeal. I bought a LOT of other stuff though, for under $16. Three of those chicken legs, which were large, and locally-sourced chicken. They came to 1.250g or so, meaning they were about all I could put in my small old crockpot along with pot vegetables (onion, carrot, the hard stems of kale, frozen veg scraps...) The cooked chicken has been removed from the crockpot and is in the fridge, the bones put back in withe the pot veg to keep on cooking for the rest of the night at least.

Here is a recipe for caldo verde. http://leitesculinaria.com/7580/recipes-portuguese-kale-soup-caldo-verde... I dont have any chouriço but might buy a piece tomorrow as I have to go near a Portuguese "intermarché" superette. However, I think my chicken will be going into the soup, which will be more of a soup-stew (simple meal for cold weather).

Timebandit

That sounds very nice, lagatta!

I made a quick lentil soup last night - green lentils, carrots, celery, onion, diced canned tomatoes, garlic and some basil and oregano. Cornmeal muffins on the side.

We are still in the midst of renovation chaos. It's been 4 months now, or as I refer to it, Week 15 of 6. Credit for the three weeks over Christmas and new year, plus a work trip the first week of January where I had them stay out. It's nice to be able to cook in the evenings, though. I had three months where it was crock pot, microwave and outdoor grill - that was into December.

lagatta

Yes, I julienned the kale and reduced my stock a bit, early this morning. The soup won't take long to put together. I might substitute quinoa for the potatoes, because I have some leftover quinoa and it is good in soup - that is how it is often used in the Andes.

About time you can cook indoors, Timebandit!

Timebandit

We got stove and oven capabilities back in the second week of December. We should have been totally done the second week of November.  It's been frustrating.  BUT, it's made being able to cook again a very appreciated ability!

lagatta

I took a break from work to finish off the Caldo verde soup - it involved a lot of fine chopping, but I enjoy fine chopping. That would not be the case if I had four kids! I did get the chouriço. One thing I did differently from the recipe I shared was that it called for ALL the onion-garlic-potato-kale mix to be puréed with a stick blender. That seemed too much like baby food, and the types I'd eaten in Portuguese restaurants had more texture, so I puréed half (as one often does with legume-based soups). I had put some of those baby-cut carrots (which I NEVER buy), leftover from a co-op Christmas party in the stock (I don't like eating them; find them hard and tasteless). I sliced them into tiny rounds, if nothing more some colour contrast (as was the sausage). Some fresh parsley on top would be nice too, but I'm out of it. It made quite a lot, but I think it will freeze well.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:

That sounds very nice, lagatta!

I made a quick lentil soup last night - green lentils, carrots, celery, onion, diced canned tomatoes, garlic and some basil and oregano.

I guess I kind of combined both of your meals the other day.  I'd found a nice plump chicken leg in my freezer and wasn't sure what to do with it, so I browned it up in the Dutch oven, added the usual vegetables, and a big old handful of beluga lentils and some stock.  I gave myself a good rating on Yelp after that one.

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but I enjoy fine chopping.

+1

Do you know, is there a difference between caldo verde and sopa verde?  I've made at least one -- the classic Portuguese soup one.  I'm not a huge kale eater, but we sure did like that soup.

The portuguese grocers and butchers around here sell an impressive selection of chorizos, cured meats and other dry sausage-type things, but I'm not very good at knowing which is what, exactly, though I do generally think that the more red there is on the package, the more likely it'll be to be spicy.

One of my local butchers, Pavao, sells vacuum packs of chopped up Portuguese bacon (which seems kind of like ham, but a bit more smokey and a bit less salty) for potato prices.  Think of maybe two cups of chopped ham (only better) for under $3.  I've taken to picking up a couple, dividing them into ziplocs and freezing them for those times when it's a bacon/lentil soup day, or I want a really fat omelette or whatever.

lagatta

The old Segall's grocery at the corner of St-Laurent and Duluth sells bags of hunks of prosciutto (offcuts that couldn't be sliced by machine) for a similar price, but they don't also have them. I also buy those for the same reason. I haven't found the Portugese ham on sale. And Segall's is a lot more Portuguese than Italian. As the name indicates, it was originally Askhenazi Jewish, and the old owner's son is still there, but most of the staff are Portuguese. But a lot of their customers, other than Portuguese and other "ethnic" shoppers of a certain age, are university and Cégep students, as it is about half way between McGill and Université du Québec à Montréal (UQAM) and Cégep du Vieux-Montréal.

This prosciutto is local, of course, but it is perfectly fine for the uses you state, and if one slices it carefully into little canapé sizes, is very popular with any friends popping in for drinks and snacks.

lagatta

A few Madhur Jaffrey recipes, perused at the Pest while reading an article posted by a babbler on Ontario colleges and Saudi Arabia. We know that this was lifted from some other media outlet, but what the hell. Yes, there is cauliflower - I've already seen it cheaper, and no reason you couldn't use frozen if you can find it.

http://news.nationalpost.com/life/food-drink/madhur-jaffrey-godmother-of...

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

I had an old paperback copy of her first book, basically "stolen" from a friend.  We lost touch for quite a while, but I never lost the book (nor forgot whose it was -- it had her name in it).  About 20 years after I'd first borrowed it we met up again and I gave it back.  But I got a lot of mileage out of those recipes, particularly back when I was first starting to try to cook well.

Funny, we don't really eat that much Indian anymore, but when we lived in Hamilton the "go to" place for a fancier, grown-up "real tablecloth" meal was "Gate of India" on John (or James... I forget). 

And our "go to" lunch place was a little all-you-can-eat place on Main called "Shehnai" -- all the usual Indian buffet suspects (basmati rice, dal, naan, tandoori chicken, a few wet curries that varied from visit to visit, and pickle) for $5.99.  Mind you I'm talking about $5.99 in 1990.

mark_alfred

Popcorn done in a pot using a bit of coconut oil turns out very well.  It's so good that I don't even need to add salt or anything else to it afterword. It's yummy just as it is. 

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