Canadian federal election 2019 part 3

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Sean in Ottawa

Big if not true.

bekayne wrote:

Big if true:

Misfit Misfit's picture

Actually, this is a serious gaffe but it isn’t an election issue unless the Minister of Veterans Affairs personally approved of the guy’s benefits to be offered if he didn’t serve in the military. But that would be an issue with the MP and not the party.

How does someone get DVA benefits without providing proof of service in the military and why would the guy apply for DVA benefits if he didn’t serve?

i find the issue to be bizarre and more tabloid style information than from a credible source.

NDPP

BIG AND True!

"...On Monday, 15 Haitian community activists and allies occupied Justin Trudeau's election office for a little over three hours. The office occupation took place in solidarity with mobilizations in Haiti and elsewhere against President Jovenal Moise and an apartheid-like class/race system enforced by Washington, Paris and Ottawa..."

Canadian Imperialism in Haiti in the Spotlight

https://yvesengler.com/2019/10/05/canadian-imperialism-in-haiti-in-the-s...

More questions to ask your candidates...

Misfit Misfit's picture

Ok. It did happen. CTV covered the story. It isn’t tabloid journalism.

CTV

This still isn’t an election issue. According to the article, the murderer’s father served in the Canadian military and suffers from PTSD. The family of the father also qualify for PTSD treatment because DVA treats it as a family issue.

IMO, if he suffers from PTSD, and he is serving time in prison for murder, then the federal government would be paying for his treatments anyway since he is in prison.

The optics are bad. I am more concerned about the nature of the crime and the length of time he is serving for the crime that he committed.

Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

I don't expect this to work as well as Willie Horton did in 1988.

Aristotleded24

radiorahim wrote:
I'm not one of those folks who believes that you just elect a left government and then you can go to sleep for the next four years while your lefty government does progressive things.    Mass based social movements have to pressure governments no matter what party is in government.   It's just a whole lot easier generally when it's the social movements that got you elected in the first place.

That's why it was actually a conservative government that brought medicare to Manitoba.

bekayne

It seems I was misunderstood. The way the tweet was written suggested it was Veterans Affairs that murdered the man.

Left Turn Left Turn's picture

radiorahim wrote:
The Liberals have always been about sprinkling a very thin layer of fairy dust around...just enough to keep social discontent under wraps so that folks don't look to more left-wing alternatives.

The Liberals are the party of "Look at the left hand and pay no attention to what the right hand is doing."

Badriya

dp

Badriya

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

Big if not true.

Here's the story, which appears to be true though not exactly as represented in the tweet.

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/pay-for-a-killers-therapy-to-overcome-t...

bekayne wrote:

Big if true:

NorthReport
kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Thanks for that last article NR. This article is one of the best analysis of the ethnic Chinese Canadian voters available. I wonder how many ridings are affected by the potential 300,000 Hong Kong/Canadian voters. They can only vote in ridings that they have previously lived in. If they decide to vote in numbers theoretically they could outnumber the resident voters in Richmond ridings, that would be a Lulu.

Andres Malchaski, president of MIREMS International, which monitors the ethnic-language media and helped create Diversityvotes.ca, says that, while a large portion of Canadians tell pollsters the environment is their top election issue, that issue is far outweighed in the Chinese-language media by debates over immigration and refugees.

Chinese-Canadian media outlets, including their discussion forums, contain frequent criticism of Liberal leader Justin Trudeau for bringing in more than 60,000 Syrian refugees since 2015, said Machalski, who has analyzed Canada’s ethnic media for three decades.

Media outlets that target Canadians from China are often wary of refugees from Muslim countries, Machalski said, an attitude that reflects the way China’s authoritarian leaders have restricted the religious freedom of millions of Uighur Muslims.

“The feelings expressed by some of the calls and comments on phone-in shows and in newspaper columns (in Canada) certainly support the idea there will be segments of Chinese voters that might even go so far as to support the People’s Party of Canada,” which is calling for reducing immigration and refugee levels, Machalski said.

Still, Machalski emphasized that the views expressed in the Chinese-language outlets in Canada offer a “kaleidoscope” of perspectives, which often reflect whether their respective audiences are connected to Hong Kong, Taiwan, Hanoi or Beijing.

That is especially so in regards to the recent anti-Beijing protests in the financial centre of Hong Kong.

More than 300,000 people living in Hong Kong hold Canadian passports — and Oct. 21 marks the first Canadian election in which they can cast a ballot, says a Diversityvotes.ca article by Blythe Irwin.

The Chinese media is picking up on everything Canadian politicians are saying about the special administrative region of China. Ethnic-Chinese media commentators, she says, are both approving and sceptical of the way Trudeau says he is “extremely concerned” about Hong Kong, while Conservative leader Andrew Scheer went further by declaring in a tweet: “We are all Hong Kongers.”

Fenella Sung, a former Chinese-language radio show host, said that Chinese-media perspectives about the conflict largely reflect whether the Canadian-based outlets are aimed at audiences rooted in Hong Kong or China.

It’s not surprising that readers of media directed at the large mainland-Chinese population in Canada “would think the Hong Kong issue is China’s internal affair and that it would not be appropriate for Canadian politicians to comment,” said Sung, who is a member of Canadian Friends of Hong Kong.

Long-time immigrants from Hong Kong, Taiwan and other parts of East Asia, Sung said, tend to have political concerns that are in line with Canadians at large, such as jobs, housing and protecting the environment.

“But newer and younger immigrants, mostly from mainland China, are very consistent and focussed on economic growth, expansion of trade, less government bureaucracy, and lower taxation. They don’t like social spending.”

Prior to the B.C. election in 2016, some opinion polls suggested that, even while the province’s more than 500,000 ethnic Chinese voters held diverse views, they generally leaned to the centre-right B.C. Liberals, and had almost no interest in the Greens.

https://vancouversun.com/opinion/columnists/douglas-todd-how-the-electio...

https://vancouversun.com/opinion/columnists/douglas-todd-how-the-electio...

Sean in Ottawa

My impression from the Chinese contacts is that while some think there is a Chinese block of voters in fact there are many different motivations, loyalties, priorities and feelings and they are not leading to the same party.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

My impression from the Chinese contacts is that while some think there is a Chinese block of voters in fact there are many different motivations, loyalties, priorities and feelings and they are not leading to the same party.

Thats what the article says only in some depth. I lived and worked in Burnaby for decades and fought elections there. Saying the Chinese vote is like saying the European vote or indigenous vote. There are so many diverse communities within the terms it is a meaningless phrase. I am sure that both Svend's and Jagmeet's campaigns have Mandarin phone banks going constantly in the peak hours.

Svend and Bill had very good support from the Taiwanese community including their business leaders but not so much from the smaller numbers of immigrants from Hong Kong. But most of the people of Chinese descent that I worked with on the executive and campaign were second, third and fourth generation Canadians who spoke little or no Chinese.

NorthReport

 

Where are they getting these dinosaurs from anyway? 

https://globalnews.ca/news/6004097/green-party-abortion-social-media/

NorthReport
josh
KarlL

josh wrote:

338 projection for Quebec:

Liberals 43

Bloc 21

CPC 12

NDP 2

https://www.macleans.ca/politics/ottawa/a-338canada-projection-have-the-tories-blown-it-in-quebec/

Don't know that I agree with the Macleans analysis.  The Conservatives only had 11 Quebec seats at dissolution, so 12 is hardly a bad outcome for a pipeline-favouring Conservative leader with weaker French than the other leaders.  The bigger story is the rise of the Bloc and how that has stunted the Liberal growth potential to make up for inevitable seat losses in Atlantic Canada, Ontario and Alberta. 

Any new Bloc seat that would otherwise have become a Liberal seat is a victory of sorts for Scheer - not least because it opens up a hypothetical path to minority government for Scheer if he were to win a plurality of seats, though I don't know how he and Blanchet would ever square the pipeline issue.  It wasn't going to happen with NDP or Greens support and Mad Max looks likely to win only his own seat.

NDPP

On Target: Canada's Looming Federal Election Leaves Questions

https://www.thechronicleherald.ca/opinion/local-perspectives/scott-taylo...

"...There is little difference between the two major parties when it comes to their policies in defence. Regardless of who wins, expect that we will continue to support the forward deployment in Latvia, the training mission in Ukraine and the two separate contingents we have in Iraq..."

And probably buy the most expensive F-35 flying lemons in the world only because Washington wants it that way.

NorthReport
pietro_bcc

I heard something interesting today on CJAD that I have no reason to doubt. Apparently if you add up what we know of the cost of each parties promises the NDP's platform would actually be cheapest to implement, even cheaper than the Conservatives. This is because the Conservatives and Liberal's  platforms are heavy on boutique tax cuts, while the NDP had a few big cost promises but fewer of these tax credits and benefits. Interesting.

bekayne
NDPP

Making Stealth Privatization of Canada's Water Infrastructure An Election Issue

http://gorillaradioblog.blogspot.com/2019/10/making-stealth-privatizatio...

"With the Canadian federal election just days away, it's amazing that there's been no media focus on the Liberals' plan to privatize our municipal water and wastewater systems...?"

bekayne

Maxime Bernier's People's Party says it won't take action against one of its candidates in Nova Scotia who called Islam "pure evil" and "not compatible with democracy" in numerous social media posts.

Sybil Hogg, the PPC candidate for Sackville-Preston-Chezzetcook, made a series of posts on Twitter and Facebook with anti-Islam statements within the last year.

The posts include a response in March to a 2017 tweet from former Justice Minister Jody Wilson-Raybould, sent after the minister visited a mosque just days after the deadly Quebec City mosque attack. Hogg's response: "Islam is pure evil. Islam has no place in Canadian society."

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/peoples-party-nova-scotia-hogg-bernier-islam-social-media-posts-1.5315943

NorthReport

Tory candidate says he apologized for letter urging people to dress ‘more modestly’ to avoid rape

 

https://globalnews.ca/news/6015432/tim-durkin-belleville-slutwalk/

NorthReport

Stand up to bullies, thugs, white supremists, whoever they are, right at the beginning!

I don't trust my neighbours:' Liberal riding association reports increased vandalism, threats of violence against supporters

CTVNews.ca also spoke to NDP candidate Melissa Coenraad who’s heard similar sentiments at the door.

"We’ve definitely had people say they’re NDP supporters but they’re not going to take a sign because they don’t want to let their Conservative neighbours know that they’re voting NDP, or they’re concerned what their Conservative neighbours will say, especially in areas with strong Conservative support," she said.

Coenraad said she’s also had several calls from closeted NDP supporters who were surprised to come home to a Conservative sign propped up on their lawn, without their permission.

"A lot ask for an NDP sign in replacement," she said. "They maybe weren’t going to take a sign but they don’t want their neighbours to now think they’re voting Conservative, and because they’ve had the Conservative team so boldly put up a sign on their lawn without requesting one, they want to display their support for the NDP."

A representative from the Conservative riding association said he’s aware of this happening and attributes it to a "data" error.

 

https://election.ctvnews.ca/i-don-t-trust-my-neighbours-liberal-riding-association-reports-increased-vandalism-threats-of-violence-against-supporters-1.4633034

NorthReport
NorthReport
bekayne

No, it was a result of Capobianco's comments in Fife's Globe story. Unless you're saying Fife is a Liberal.

Misfit Misfit's picture

NorthReport wrote:

Stand up to bullies, thugs, white supremists, whoever they are, right at the beginning!

I don't trust my neighbours:' Liberal riding association reports increased vandalism, threats of violence against supporters

CTVNews.ca also spoke to NDP candidate Melissa Coenraad who’s heard similar sentiments at the door.

"We’ve definitely had people say they’re NDP supporters but they’re not going to take a sign because they don’t want to let their Conservative neighbours know that they’re voting NDP, or they’re concerned what their Conservative neighbours will say, especially in areas with strong Conservative support," she said.

Coenraad said she’s also had several calls from closeted NDP supporters who were surprised to come home to a Conservative sign propped up on their lawn, without their permission.

"A lot ask for an NDP sign in replacement," she said. "They maybe weren’t going to take a sign but they don’t want their neighbours to now think they’re voting Conservative, and because they’ve had the Conservative team so boldly put up a sign on their lawn without requesting one, they want to display their support for the NDP."

A representative from the Conservative riding association said he’s aware of this happening and attributes it to a "data" error.

 

https://election.ctvnews.ca/i-don-t-trust-my-neighbours-liberal-riding-association-reports-increased-vandalism-threats-of-violence-against-supporters-1.4633034

in my constituency, there are reports of lawn signs showing up on the wrong lawns and the residences are not on the databases. Some think that it is not due to party error but rather vandals out at night moving political lawn signs around as a prank.

Misfit Misfit's picture

Oh, and Pondering,

It’s not just western Canada. Northern Ontario does not like southern Ontario. I have spoken to people from Thunder Bay who want their region of the province to separate from Ontario and join Manitoba. They identify with western Canada.

Oh, and Pondering, I am confident that we could get all of northern Ontario to join us. 

Oh, and Pondering, don’t feel too confident and secure about northern Quebec either.

The only people who really like southern Ontario and southern Quebec politically are people from southern Ontario and southern Quebec. As people, we like you and we care, but financially and politically no one does.

Politically, you have no friends outside of your own little bubble of the Windsor-Quebec City corridor or perhaps northeast to Gaspe with the accent ague.

I have also heard negative remarks about Quebec from New Brunswick Acadians. One lady in particular told me that French is her first language and New Brunswick is fully bilingual. She told me that they achieved full bilingual status without holding the rest of the country perpetually hostage. She obviously does not speak for all Acadians in her province but her words speak volumes of a sentiment about Quebec that I have heard expressed from others as well from that province.

When Lower Canada entered confederation, it was a narrow strip of land along the St. Lawrence river. Canada gave Quebec massive sections of land after confederation. If you decide to separate, there will be a fight for all that land back, and by rights it should be put up to a vote on what the residents of the North want. That should be their decision and not yours.

We have been heavily subsidizing you, northern Quebec included. You want more power and clout for yourself in the House of Commons. You might just get everything that you want.

Be very careful what you wish for.

lagatta4

Scheer said as a father of five children, he wants to leave behind a cleaner planet, mainly by funding technological advances in greener energy.

A father of five in a wealthy country has a much higher carbon footprint than parents of twice that many in poorer countries. Frankly, Andy, get a vasectomy.

lagatta4

Scheer said as a father of five children, he wants to leave behind a cleaner planet, mainly by funding technological advances in greener energy.

A father of five in a wealthy country has a much higher carbon footprint than parents of twice that many in poorer countries. Frankly, Andy, get a vasectomy.

NorthReport
NorthReport

 

The irony of the First Nations’ vote

Pam Palmater: Here’s a hard truth about Canadian federal elections. When Indigenous peoples vote, they vote for their next oppressor.

https://www.macleans.ca/opinion/the-irony-of-the-first-nations-vote/

NorthReport

Canada's brand rose with Trudeau. Now both their reputations are on the line.

https://www.politico.com/news/2019/10/11/justin-trudeau-canada-image-044277

jerrym

ETA: We have some actual voting numbers now as opposed to poll numbers and they are good for first of all for the NDP, then the Greens because they are overwhelmingly youth votes. The national campus vote, which is now finished, is 111,300 compared to just over 70,000 in 2015, which was considered the best year for the youth vote. That is an increase of 59% in the campus vote over 2015. (https://election.ctvnews.ca/turnout-at-early-on-campus-polls-significant...)

This is good news for the NDP because, unlike 2015 when the youth overwhelmingly voted Liberal, the youth vote shows the greatest increase in the 18-35 age cohort compared to its percentage support in the entire decided population voter percentage, according to the latest Leger poll, with 25% NDP support in the 18-35 age cohort versus 18% (+7) support for the total population.

The Greens are +4% for 18-35 age cohort compared to its percentage support (15%) in the entire decided population voter percentage (10%).

The Liberals are -3% for 18-35 age cohort compared to its percentage support (28%) in the entire decided population voter percentage (31%).

The Cons are -6% for 18-35 age cohort compared to its percentage support (31%) in the entire decided population voter percentage (25%).

Of course, most campus voters are in the 18-24 age cohort rather than a 18-35 cohort, a cohort that is even more likely to support the NDP or Greens than the other parties, so it is highly likely that the margins would be even greater if one had a poll of actual campus voters. If youth comes out anywhere in the ballpark of the 59% increase in campus votes, the polls which are typicallly modeled on the last election(s) and therefore under-representing youth voters would mean that that actual NDP and Green votes could be significantly above their poll percentages.

It is not easy to get percentage increases in other age cohorts to offset a large increase in the youth vote, because the older cohorts already vote at much higher percentages. 

There is also the question of whether youth who head home for the Thanksgiving weekend from campus and have already voted start influencing their parents vote, especially with regard to the issue of climate change. 

For reference here is the Leger poll url. 

https://leger360.com/wp-content/uploads/2019/10/Federal-Politics-Oct-9-2...

 

NorthReport
Pondering

Misfit wrote:

Oh, and Pondering,

It’s not just western Canada. Northern Ontario does not like southern Ontario. I have spoken to people from Thunder Bay who want their region of the province to separate from Ontario and join Manitoba. They identify with western Canada.

Oh, and Pondering, I am confident that we could get all of northern Ontario to join us. 

Oh, and Pondering, don’t feel too confident and secure about northern Quebec either.

The only people who really like southern Ontario and southern Quebec politically are people from southern Ontario and southern Quebec. As people, we like you and we care, but financially and politically no one does.

Politically, you have no friends outside of your own little bubble of the Windsor-Quebec City corridor or perhaps northeast to Gaspe with the accent ague.

I have also heard negative remarks about Quebec from New Brunswick Acadians. One lady in particular told me that French is her first language and New Brunswick is fully bilingual. She told me that they achieved full bilingual status without holding the rest of the country perpetually hostage. She obviously does not speak for all Acadians in her province but her words speak volumes of a sentiment about Quebec that I have heard expressed from others as well from that province.

When Lower Canada entered confederation, it was a narrow strip of land along the St. Lawrence river. Canada gave Quebec massive sections of land after confederation. If you decide to separate, there will be a fight for all that land back, and by rights it should be put up to a vote on what the residents of the North want. That should be their decision and not yours.

We have been heavily subsidizing you, northern Quebec included. You want more power and clout for yourself in the House of Commons. You might just get everything that you want.

Be very careful what you wish for.

I'm not sure what it is you think I want. I'm just describing the landscape as I see it. Under PR geography doesn't matter. Unlike now every vote is equal. Rural ridings have fewer people in them. 

Southern Ontario and Quebec would have more power under PR because that is where most Canadians live. 

If ever a moment comes where a province declares itself independent you can bet within hours the indigenous people within that province would declare themselves independent. Treaties are with the federal government not the provinces. They would absolutely not agree to Canada handing them over to a province especially unceded territory. As soon as the borders of Canada are up for discussion all bets are off.

I think Canada would be insane to separate. We are greater than the sum of our parts. When politicians say unity is threatened by not allowing pipelines through they have it backwards. It is trying to force one through a province that doesn't want it that threatens unity. People feel the need to protect their land. 

No provinces pay into the fund from which equalization payments are made. As citizens of Canada we pay federal taxes. That is where equalization funds come from, not provinces. The point is so that all citizens of Canada can get equal services. I don't like the way the money is distributed because I feel it is misdirected but social services are a provincial jurisdiction so that it the route the money takes.

There is no doubt in my mind that Canada will remain one country. Neither Quebec nor Alberta will separate so they should both get over themselves. 

It will not be possible to shut down oil production in Alberta. Alberta will never willingly put a cap on how much oil they will sell. Not even for a better price unless they are absolutely forced to. The reason there is a glut is that Alberta is over producing. Alberta wants to triple production. Alberta's argument is that if they don't sell it someone else will. Someone else will sell it either way. The cheap oil is the hardest to stop. Alberta oil does not displace other oil it just adds to what is available. Alberta will be selling oil at todays rates for some time to come. During that time Alberta should be planning its transition not crying because it is being stopped from tripling production. 

We are living climate change. We already have the technology to switch. There are other things we need to do but taking more oil out of the ground to burn is not one of them. 

 

NorthReport
kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Pondering wrote:

Southern Ontario and Quebec would have more power under PR because that is where most Canadians live. 

You actually mean Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec. Strange how you used the modifier for one province but not the other. The Quebec City to Windsor corridor is where elections are won and lost because you can win a majority government there without needing seats hardly any where else. It is why I hate the idea of national interest because it really means the interests  of the people in that corridor.

The NDP have always needed to make the breakthrough in seat rich Southern Ontario to add to its Western MP's. This election it needs to stay alive in Quebec as the only real left party in the race and win in the 905 region.  That is where the Liberal seats are that should be NDP because voters voted for a lie and instead of the real deal. I still fear the Conservatives will win back seats on VI if the Greens surge. It is interesting because on VI the Greens are running against Horgan not Singh. The issue they are hammering the federal NDP about is the Provincial NDP's  Site C and LNG sellout.

Pondering

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Pondering wrote:

Southern Ontario and Quebec would have more power under PR because that is where most Canadians live. 

You actually mean Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec. Strange how you used the modifier for one province but not the other. The Quebec City to Windsor corridor is where elections are won and lost because you can win a majority government there without needing seats hardly any where else. It is why I hate the idea of national interest because it really means the interests  of the people in that corridor.

I intended for the modifier to apply to both Ontario and Quebec. Not only is it seat rich. It would have even more influence under PR than it does now. 

"The national interest" doesn't mean that area. The pipeline has been declared in the national interests and that's all about Alberta, although not really. It's what it is always about. How the rich can get richer. 

NorthReport

Despite the Greens' protests, a former leader of the B.C. Greens, Stuart Parker, has written a lengthy blog post suggesting that May is actually dog-whistling to anti-abortionists for their votes.

First off, Parker pointed out that there's nothing in the Greens' constitution outlawing whipped votes in Parliament.

"Second, one of the reasons this prohibition of whipped votes does not appear in the Green Party’s constitution is that it would be unconstitutional, and consequently unenforceable even if it were," Parker added. "As a lawyer, May knows this. The constitution of the corporation of a party cannot interfere with the supremacy of parliament or with the ability of MPs to choose with whom they caucus."

Yet the Greens say they can't whip votes.

Moreover, Parker noted that two anti-abortion Green candidates from 2015 were renominated in 2019.

He claimed that the real agenda is to send a message that a Green MP could reopen the debate on abortion in Parliament—something all other party leaders, including the Conservatives' Andrew Scheer, won't permit.

"If Green Party members, candidates and supporters want to stop these insinuations that they are pursuing a dangerous agenda putting millions of women’s human rights and bodies at risk, the solution is clear: don’t call me," Parker concluded. "Call Elizabeth May and tell her that women’s bodily autonomy and integrity is just as meriting of caucus discipline as Canada’s territorial integrity, or, ideally, much more so."

https://www.straight.com/news/1313281/greens-cry-foul-over-ndp-leaflet-distributed-southern-vancouver-island-homes

Sean in Ottawa

Pondering wrote:

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Pondering wrote:

Southern Ontario and Quebec would have more power under PR because that is where most Canadians live. 

You actually mean Southern Ontario and Southern Quebec. Strange how you used the modifier for one province but not the other. The Quebec City to Windsor corridor is where elections are won and lost because you can win a majority government there without needing seats hardly any where else. It is why I hate the idea of national interest because it really means the interests  of the people in that corridor.

I intended for the modifier to apply to both Ontario and Quebec. Not only is it seat rich. It would have even more influence under PR than it does now. 

"The national interest" doesn't mean that area. The pipeline has been declared in the national interests and that's all about Alberta, although not really. It's what it is always about. How the rich can get richer. 

Sorry I think you are making a mistake here. PR is a group of models that may include an absolute proportional weighting between provinces but many models of it do not. If they did there would be more constitutional and political obstacles to PR than there are.

The proportion is about each party's representation in the unit. some of these unites are the regions, others the provinces and some are modified slightly, the design is to make the parties have a equal share of the seats as votes. It doe snot mean the provinces all have an equal share of the seats as their population.

I am in favour of the first and not the second. My reasoning is twofold: first I do not want the Constitution to be an obstacle to proportioning votes among the parties based on support.

Second with diffrent sized provinces if the proportion of seats is equal some will still have outsized power -- especially Ontario and this does not benefit Canada, other provinces or even Ontario itself (unity is a value). I have explained this before and can do it again if needed.

Given that splitting Ontario to help is not an immediate possibility, we have to do other things to balance this province. Sure we can imagine Eastern Ontario becoming a Province and the nother joining Manitoba but this still leaves an outsized influence. The alternative is to reduce the proportional number of seats for Ontario and increase the proportion of seats the smallest provinces have. This is what we now have and could increase it slightly more.

It is wrong to say that PR means proportional seat count to provincial population. It only means proportional seat count to votes.  Not all PR models have seats even allocated by geography at all. Many have balancing exttra seats.

Please stop saying that PR balances provincial seats by population becuase it is not about that.

NorthReport

Why did the unprepared Liberals call the election now as they could have waited for another year to call it?

josh

W

NorthReport wrote:

Why did the unprepared Liberals call the election now as they could have waited for another year to call it?

They could have?

NorthReport

Sure

They presently have a majority and could have changed the election date 

NorthReport
bekayne

NorthReport wrote:

Why did the unprepared Liberals call the election now as they could have waited for another year to call it?

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fixed_election_dates_in_Canada#Federal

pietro_bcc

The NDP's campaign has been impressive and they're peaking at the right time. They'll likely surpass Mulcair's result both in seats and popular vote (I'm thinking an increase in seats to maybe 50-60 and for popular vote maybe even reaching 25%.) They're even climbing in Quebec where they're at 18.9% according to today's Nanos poll. The most important factor is momentum, Mulcair ended the campaign with no momentum and got 20%. Right now Singh has essentially reached Mulcair's mark, has all the momentum and is peaking at the perfect time.

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