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A Canadian Jeremy Corbyn/Bernie Sanders?

CanadaApple
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Joined: Dec 1 2011

It's been awhile since I posted here, but I though this might merit some discussion....

 

As you may have heard, Jeremy Corbyn won the leadership of the UK Labour Party this weekend, challenging the status-quo from the left of the political spectrum. In America, Bernie Sanders is also doing the same and is starting to poll well against Hillary Clinton, though I'm still not sure he can win the nomination. However, both of these two got me thinking: do we have anyone here in Canada on the Federal scene who could challenge the status-quo from the left? Someone who could run for the leadership of the NDP or the Liberals if either Mulcair or Trudeau has to step down after this election? Any ideas?


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alan smithee
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Joined: Jan 7 2010

Sadly,Canada doesn't have a Bernie Sanders or a Jeremy Corbyn.

Mulcair and Trudeau are as moderate of a choice you can ask for in this election. I don't see anyone taking up those roles any time soon.


swallow
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Joined: May 16 2002

Come back, Svend! 


clambake
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Joined: Apr 21 2011

Linda McQuaig


clambake
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Joined: Apr 21 2011

edit: double post


Mr. Magoo
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Joined: Dec 13 2002

6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010

Sounds great!

Shall we see if we can get it done in the next week, or would five more years of Harper give us time to wrap up all the loose ends?


NDPP
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Joined: Dec 28 2008

What Could a Canadian Syriza do?

Sell the people out. Just like the Greek one did. There is no Canadian equivalent to Corbyn. But there may be to Tony Blair. Next time maybe...

More:

"The lessons of Syriza's abject capitulation in Greece must be understood, so that workers are not blindsided by the manoeuvers, compromises and betrayal that will inevitably follow Corbyn's victory.

If some in the political establishment and the media now speak with horror of an electoral 'earthquake' that could change the political landscape in Britain, it is not Corbyn that makes them nervous, but the mass movement that is developing and which they fear he will not be able to contain."

The Political Issues Posed by Corbyn's Election and UK Labour Party Leader

https://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2015/09/14/pers-s14.html


NDPP
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Joined: Dec 28 2008

Chris Hedges poses a similar question. Although American close enough in some ways..

Where is Our Jeremy Corbyn?

http://www.truthdig.com/report/item/where_is_our_jeremy_corbyn_20150913

"I will not support a politician who sells out the Palestinians and panders to the Israel lobby..."

Unfortunately, lots will.


Unionist
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Joined: Dec 11 2005

swallow wrote:

Come back, Svend! 

That's two votes.

 


6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010

As for the actual question, I wasn't completely taking a piss there.

It is a good question, even if the timing is a bit absurd.

Honestly, it ain't going to become clear until after this election, because the circumstances around that - whether it is within an existing party, or something entirely new - won't be know until we know how this election is going to shake down.

And another possibility is that that alternative might not be in the form of a political party at all. As some here like to go on about, the party and electoral system are kind of overrated. I don't think it is a complete lost cause, but I think there is some sense there.

 

 


kropotkin1951
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Joined: Jun 6 2002

Unionist wrote:

swallow wrote:

Come back, Svend! 

That's two votes.

From a local perspective the best part of Svend was always Bill. He was doing the heavy lifting in the background while Svend delivered the message.

Come back Bill Siksay!! We need a man of peace.


kropotkin1951
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Joined: Jun 6 2002

The original post contains the absurd notion that the Liberal party is a party that a socialist peace activist would run to lead. That idea is far fetched for the NDP but ridiculous for the Liberals.


alan smithee
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Joined: Jan 7 2010

I think Mulcair and Trudeau are moderates. Not socialists,not revolutionists,not even left wing. Just moderate compared to Herr Harper.


ikosmos
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Joined: May 8 2001

alan smithee wrote:
Sadly,Canada doesn't have a Bernie Sanders or a Jeremy Corbyn.

Someone else quoted Chris Hedges and I think it was Hedges that pointed out how Sanders is still a full on supporter of the MIC in the US. Corbyn is actually anti war.

Anyway, I have no doubt that we have such people. They are, however, nowhere near winning the leadership of the NDP and, since we're in election mode, the latter is doing a fine job of taking advantage of the situation to throw all the left wing candidates under the bus (on Israel, you name it) and do a little house cleaning.

If the NDP can form a government, and silence the left indefinitely, they can do wonderful harm to the very idea of a Canadian Corbyn. As much as I hate to agree with Smith, I'd be more inclined to look outside the Parliamentary cretins for such a leader.


swallow
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Joined: May 16 2002

So, as we get a bit more serious.... Bear in mind that Corbyn struggled to get nominated for leadership. At that point, people in Britain would have been asking who their socialist champion could possibly be in the shitshow that was the Labour party. Any such figure in Canada will be a virtual unknown, who may one day manage to crystaliize a message and be elected based on the hard work of social movement activists. There's no point waiiting for a saviour to emerge in organized politics. We have to do the work, not wait for the leader. 

And presumably no one needs reminding that Corbyn ain't going to deliver the new Jerusalem on a plate, either. 


CanadaApple
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Joined: Dec 1 2011

I should clarify, when I talk about a Canadian Jeremy Corbyn/Bernie Sanders, I don't mean that they would be a carbon copy of either of them. I'm talking about someone who could challenge the centre-right/neoliberal orthodoxy of their respective party from the left. Bernie Sanders may not be left-wing on Israel/Palestine but he is on other issues that challenge the status quo of the Democratic Party. That's the kind of person I'm talking about. Yes, I realize the idea of that happening in the Liberal Party is rather unlikely but I don't think it's impossible since I'm not expecting them to be a socialist, necessarily. Do you see any people on the federal scene who could possibly move the centre to the left in a fashion similar to Sanders or Corbyn?

Also, I'm by no means trying to suggest that people should just wait around for this hypothetical leader the emerge. I just think it's interesting to look at the possibility and who that person could be.

 

 


Slumberjack
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Joined: Aug 8 2005

Any socially minded front person would have to clean house in their respective parties.  How such a person would even begin getting rid of so many lackeys, stooges, sycophants, water carriers, bagmen, get-a-way drivers and charletans is difficult to imagine.


Brachina
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Joined: Feb 15 2012

 Lets not judge how leftwing Mulcair is until the platform in released. And the those of you who think Isreal and Palastine should be the ballot box question, I know this hasn't occurred to you, but this isn't Palastine or Isreal, and believe it or not Canada will not be deciding the fate of the middle east, although Harper also doesn't seem to understand that either. How about we decide how to fix Canada before we decide how to fix the rest of the world.


josh
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Joined: Aug 5 2002

Brachina wrote:

 Lets not judge how leftwing Mulcair is until the platform in released.

Is that before or after the release of his book, Maggie and Me.


Slumberjack
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Joined: Aug 8 2005

It would certainly be different for a change if, politically speaking, someone would emerge to stir the pot.  Seems like such a long time since we last had our pot stirred.  Bernie Sanders is quite challenged on the global imperialism front.  Read someplace, not sure where at the moment, that what politicos have in mind for people overseas is generally a harbinger of their true attitude toward domestic audiences, ie: they're to be exploited for the gain of the few.  American style liberalism should have had it up the wazoo with hopey change gimmicks by now....or have they?  It remains to be seen what the UK's socialist will roll out.


ikosmos
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Joined: May 8 2001

Brachina wrote:

 Lets not judge how leftwing Mulcair is until the platform in released. And the those of you who think Isreal and Palastine should be the ballot box question, I know this hasn't occurred to you, but this isn't Palastine or Isreal, and believe it or not Canada will not be deciding the fate of the middle east, although Harper also doesn't seem to understand that either. How about we decide how to fix Canada before we decide how to fix the rest of the world.

 

Just to be clear; today's NDP has decided, itself, that any genuine advocacy of Palestinian rights are grounds for expulsion from candidacy for the Party. (And they're done it in a Kafka-esque way in relations to what is, and what is not, Party policy. See unionist's contribution on the appropriate thread. ) So they've decide on their own to "solve" that issue before they move on to "fixing Canada".

Nice try for spin.


ikosmos
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Joined: May 8 2001

SIDEBAR

Slumberjack wrote:
  Read someplace, not sure where at the moment, that what politicos have in mind for people overseas is generally a harbinger of their true attitude toward domestic audiences, ie: they're to be exploited for the gain of the few.

I recently read an article by a European historian who argued that what was unique about Hitler was that he introduced a colonial barbarity to relations with other Europeans. The Europeans were used to treating others this way, in their own colonies, and not suffering in the same manner themselves. It's a fascinating idea and perhaps that's where you heard it.

Supplemental: other related facts. 1. As a result of the Treaty of Versailles (1919), all of Germany's colonies were taken away. 2. Hitler, in response to denunciation of his genocidal anti-Semitism, pointed out that the Turks had their own genocide in Armenia and, of course, the North American colonies had their genocide with the indigenous peoples. "Who remembers the Armenians?" (or something like that) was his comment.


6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010

Hitler introduced colonial barbarity?

Perhaps you should talk to someone from Ireland or Scotland. And as for Germany, I think Henry the Lion (who used up so many men that he had to import more from Poland) set that bar half a millenium before Mr. Hilter

Sorry, he invented a few things; that wasn't one of them.

As for SJ's comment at #17, you don't have a party, or any organization, without some dead weight. That is a myth, which is why I think the messiah some here might be looking for may be outside the party system.

Parties are by their nature dirty machines, as is electoral politics. Putting the whole focus on purging comes with its own problems and pitfalls. Besides, this isn't the first time. Who do you think is most likely to be doing the purging?

 

 


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