Conservative leadership race #1

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Wilf Day
Conservative leadership race #1

You read it here first.

Caissa

Rex Murphy.

Unionist

What race? Habemus Harper.

Fiat voluntas sua sicut in caelo et in terra.

 

Caissa

Dulce et decorun est pro patria mori.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Don Cherry.

Ippurigakko

hope they picks Alison because next election cpc would completely lose! lol

Sean in Ottawa

My neighbour's dog might want to run. I'll wish him well.

mtm

Jim Prentice will come back.

flight from kamakura

mad max!

seriously surprising how young most of those folks are (relatively speaking).

Mr.Tea

I think it will be Jason Kenney vs. Jim Prentice.

Ippurigakko

Dean Del Mastro! bwahahahaha

Wilf Day

Mr.Tea wrote:

I think it will be Jason Kenney vs. Jim Prentice.

Remember the Conservative Party has equality of ridings. Quebec Conservatives will have 78 votes for every 34 votes from Alberta.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Ippurigakko wrote:

Dean Del Mastro! bwahahahaha

That's just mean! Laughing

Wilf Day

Out of the 12 listed so far (not including Del Mastro Tongue out ), how many are bilingual now? How many have recently signed up for French language training?

Caissa

Do the Cons really need a bilingual leader in order to win a phony majority, Wilf?

Ippurigakko

theres only 5 quebeckers conservative francophones, idk if outside quebec can speak french? Last cons leadership race was Tony Clement and Belinda Stronach, both speak French?

 

Oh yeah Andrew Scheer, he said he bilingual from Sask. the Speaker.

Wilf Day

Caissa wrote:

Do the Cons really need a bilingual leader in order to win a phony majority, Wilf?

Maybe not; but with 23% of the votes in the leadership contest being cast in Quebec (not to mention francophone New Brunswickers like Bernard Lord, and franco-Ontarians), a unilingual candidate will be at a disadvantage.

David Young

Forget about Peter McKay going for the Conservative leadership again.

I suspect he will look to provincial politics after the provincial Conservatives are routed once again in next year's election, and the Tories quickly show Jamie Baille the door and start looking for a new leader.

 

Ippurigakko

Oh wait! Pierre Poutine of Separatist Street in Joliette, QC, he should be there on cpc next leader! hahahah

theleftyinvestor

Just to toss it out there: Kevin Falcon will be 50 and probably recently retired. He's mused about not running again. If the BC Liberals fall apart in 2013, I could see him going to federal Conservatives rather than splash around in the swampy muck of the BC Conservative Party.

Wilf Day

theleftyinvestor wrote:

Kevin Falcon.

Anytime you hear of him taking his summer holidays in Chicoutimi, let us know. Otherwise, I'm sceptical.

adma

I wouldn't be surprised if Mike Chong runs.

CanadaApple

Ippurigakko wrote:

Dean Del Mastro! bwahahahaha

Let's raise the stakes...Rob Ford. Tongue out

Pogo Pogo's picture

Who is working the membership?  I would think that there will be a defiantly unilingual candidate of some measure, just because there is a constituency that will be attracted to that kind of candidate.

Doctor Manderly

 Mackay is the  biggest contender..hence the extra cuts directed  at his department,....who all loved the man....

Maysie Maysie's picture

Take Rob Ford. Please.

Wilf Day

In November 2014, after eight years as Prime Minister and twelve years as party leader, lagging in the polls behind Tom Mulcair, Stephen Harper (then 55) announces his resignation as Conservative Party leader. The party decides to chose a new leader in April 2005, six months before the election due Oct. 19, 2015.

Who are the contenders?

Peter MacKay will be 49.

John Baird will be 45.

Tony Clement will be 53.

Jean Charest will be 56.

Jason Kenney will be 46.

Lisa Raitt will be 46.

Alison Redford will be 49.

Maxime Bernier will be 51.

Bernard Lord will be 49.

Christian Paradis will be 40.

James Moore will be 38.

Jim Prentice will be 58. 

Who am I missing?

Wilf Day

Wilf Day wrote:

theleftyinvestor wrote:

Kevin Falcon.

Anytime you hear of him taking his summer holidays in Chicoutimi, let us know. Otherwise, I'm sceptical.

So, Parliament has resumed. Is anyone more bilingual after taking summer holidays in Chicoutimi?

theleftyinvestor

Wilf Day wrote:

Wilf Day wrote:

theleftyinvestor wrote:

Kevin Falcon.

Anytime you hear of him taking his summer holidays in Chicoutimi, let us know. Otherwise, I'm sceptical.

So, Parliament has resumed. Is anyone more bilingual after taking summer holidays in Chicoutimi?

No idea, but he's now on a more permanent sort of vacation :P

mark_alfred

Perhaps some old Liberals like Manley or McKenna, or perhaps Mark Carney would be interested.

Wilf Day

Steve Paikin:

Quote:
This summer, Harper will have been a member of parliament for eleven consecutive years and 15 altogether (he served a previous term from 1993-97, before leaving, temporarily as it turns out).

* This summer, Harper will have been leader of his party (Canadian Alliance/Conservative) for eleven years.

* This summer, Harper will have been prime minister for seven-and-a-half years, which may not sound like a long time, but it puts him in ninth place (out of 22 PMs) overall in terms of tenure. He'd have to spend another year and a half in office to pass Louis St. Laurent, who's eighth on the list.

Arthur Cramer Arthur Cramer's picture

Maysie wrote:

Take Rob Ford. Please.

ME: Doctor, doctor it hurts when I do that

Doctor: Don't do that.

NorthReport

The Conservatives Party

 

 

Ron Paul, Preston Manning, and Ezra Levant walk into a bar. Welcome to the Manning Networking Conference, a political gathering like no other.

Notably absent from the conference roster is Dr. Tom Flanagan, the intellectual "godfather" behind Harper's rise to power. Flanagan was dropped from the program last week after publicly airing his "grave doubts" about jailing consumers of child porn -- then chuckling, unprompted, about his years on the mailing list of NAMBLA. Thirty seconds of cellphone video, and Flanagan's career was over. If the supposed master strategist is capable of such a spectacular misstep, then so is anyone.

An ominous poll from Nanos this week put Conservative support nationally at 31.5 per cent, lower than it has been since August 2009. The Liberals are in second place, even before the official coronation of Justin Trudeau, while the NDP is hoping to build off a likely provincial victory in the upcoming B.C. election.

Meanwhile, Manning Conference sponsors Enbridge and TransCanada face grassroots opposition and regulatory uncertainty in building pipelines west, south and east from the oil sands. Landlocked Canadian bitumen, and where to send it, is the subject of a panel debate this weekend between Dr. Wenran Jiang of the Asia-Pacific Institute, U.S. Chamber of Commerce delegate Matt Koch, and Blaine Higgs, Finance Minister of New Brunswick and a longtime employee of Irving Oil -- owners of the massive Saint John refinery.

Here to discuss the role of women in conservative politics are MPs Michelle Rempel, Candice Bergen (formerly Hoeppner, best-known for the bill she introduced to eliminate the long-gun registry), and Joan Crockatt (former managing editor at the Calgary Herald and winner of the November byelection in Calgary Centre). This is an important conversation for a party that still faces a gender gap at the polls.

"Is the federal Conservative Party at a high water mark? How can we continue to attract new supporters?" So asks another panel featuring ethnic outreach guru Jason Kenney, along with cabinet colleague Maxime Bernier -- one of only five Conservative MPs to survive the "Orange Wave" in Quebec.

Each topic provides a clue as to the movement's current preoccupations. The urban-rural divide, the legacy of Attawapiskat, Canada's reputation abroad -- expect more frank discussion of the Conservative government's missteps and weaknesses than you will ever hear in Question Period.

Throw in "Free Thinking Film screenings" (on the program: Atlas Shrugged!) and free-flowing hospitality in the sponsor suites. Toss in a keynote address by libertarian presidential candidate Ron Paul (spotted enjoying the show in the House of Commons yesterday), and a panel with "Harper's Aussie Advisor," former prime minister John Howard. Sprinkle in pollsters, pundits, pro-lifers, and petroleum execs. It's a big tent, as they say.

What new vocabulary and tactics are coming to Canada? Which advocacy groups or opposition politicos do conservatives most fear? Where does the party still feel it can break through? Will Ezra dance?

http://thetyee.ca/News/2013/03/08/Manning-Networking-Conference/

Sean in Ottawa

This is a warning to those who over-demonize Harper personally rather than acknowledge that this is the party and its culture.

A switch at the top and nothing much would change. Those thinking otherwise are delusional. But if the rhetoric is just about Harper the switcheroo could work. Scary that.

Debater

Steve Paikin rasies some interesting ideas, and it's always possible that Harper could pack it in before the next election given that he has failed to grow support for the CPC in the polls since 2011.  But I tend to think he wants to have one more election and try to take on Justin Trudeau and Thomas Mulcair.

Btw, Steve Paikin's son, Zach Paikin is a rising young LPC star.  Weekly political panelist on CTV Newsnet and columnist for Ipolitics.ca Smile

NorthReport

Well said Sean.

 

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

This is a warning to those who over-demonize Harper personally rather than acknowledge that this is the party and its culture.

A switch at the top and nothing much would change. Those thinking otherwise are delusional. But if the rhetoric is just about Harper the switcheroo could work. Scary that.

Arthur Cramer Arthur Cramer's picture

Debater, Zach Paikin is a rabidly overly partisan Liberal activist who is a lot like those on their way to the top in your party. Suck up to the establishment, and trump the party line. I have read his Huff Post blogs, and aside from the usual LPC propaganda, they contain nothing else of content. Try again.

Debater

AC, I made a passing reference to the fact that Zach Paikin is a young man on the rise.  A partisan personal attack on Zach from you is not required.  As Catchfire suggested to you yesterday, perhaps you should take a break from chatting about politics if it's going to cause you a heart attack every 2 minutes.

Btw, Zach was at the CJPAC gathering last night - he does a lot of work in Canada's Jewish community.  Perhaps you will run into him sometime! He's a very smart young man, so be aware that he can take you in a debate. Wink  He's Steve Paikin's son - he's no dummy!

Btw, I have to laugh at the phrase "rabidly overly partisan Liberal activist"!  Because of course there are no rabid partisan NDP activists here! Laughing

Arthur Cramer Arthur Cramer's picture

Debater, you aren't a mod. I offered my opinion on Zach. And by the way, don't be so sure about what I can and can't do. Ok? Ok!

Sean in Ottawa

I think partisan personal attacks on public figurea are okay here-- otherwise how would we even speak about Harper?

The isues is personal attacks on members of this Board-- that is the distinction as I understand it but a mod could comment.

Sean in Ottawa

Justin Trudeau’s lacklustre reception outside Ontario, B.C. should worry Liberals: Hébert

"The bigger national picture, the wave of Trudeaumania that is sweeping the Liberal party’s leadership campaign features more sea foam than coast-to-coast momentum."

...

With Trudeau in the campaign, the third-place Liberals have enjoyed a disproportional amount of mostly positive media attention for months on end. It looks like it will take a lot more than that to put them back on the map of regions such as Quebec and the Prairies in which the party has become chronically weak.

If the past is any indication, popularity and the successful signing up of scores of non-paying supporters will not do the job — or at least not for long enough.

The precipitous 1993 election decline of the Progressive Conservatives under Kim Campbell demonstrated that fundamentals eventually reassert themselves, even in the face of an initially popular new leader."

http://www.thestar.com/news/canada/2013/03/08/justin_trudeaus_lacklustre...

Chantal Hébert can be hard to ignore because she has that nasty habit of being right very, very often.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Trudeau the First was despised in BC and its hard to see how the name will sway many voters in this province.  However I don't discount the Canadian Idol effect, after all many people love Michael Buble and Celine Dion.

Sean in Ottawa

You are right. Sigh.

But it is hard to say how long that will last. People could be well and truly sick of Just-in-Time by election day.

radiorahim radiorahim's picture

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

This is a warning to those who over-demonize Harper personally rather than acknowledge that this is the party and its culture.

A switch at the top and nothing much would change. Those thinking otherwise are delusional. But if the rhetoric is just about Harper the switcheroo could work. Scary that.

Agreed.

The attack on the working class, what's left of the social safety net, the environment, human/civil rights from the right-wing will continue no matter who is at the top.    It's just that some leaders may be better at carrying out this attack than others.

 

adma

I'm wondering if there'll be an "official SoCon" in the race, i.e. someone representing the Woodworth Caucus--sort of like Tom Wappel relative to the federal Liberals...

JKR

adma wrote:

I'm wondering if there'll be an "official SoCon" in the race, i.e. someone representing the Woodworth Caucus--sort of like Tom Wappel relative to the federal Liberals...

Jason Kenney?

I think he's the current front runner to replace Harper.

janfromthebruce

radiorahim wrote:

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

This is a warning to those who over-demonize Harper personally rather than acknowledge that this is the party and its culture.

A switch at the top and nothing much would change. Those thinking otherwise are delusional. But if the rhetoric is just about Harper the switcheroo could work. Scary that.

Agreed.

The attack on the working class, what's left of the social safety net, the environment, human/civil rights from the right-wing will continue no matter who is at the top.    It's just that some leaders may be better at carrying out this attack than others.

 

Ditto and which is why I don't buy into we have to come together to get rid of Harper. Drilling down what policies and positions do individuals don't like and would be different under a Liberal, Green, or NDP govt? That to me is the essence of what the conversation should be about?

In the last election one Conservative and Liberal argument was about the F15 fighter jets. They both agreed on wanting to buy them, but one was willing to buy without engines and other with engines.

Of course, the NDP didn't want to fight any stinking fighter jets with our without engines!

 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

janfromthebruce wrote:

In the last election one Conservative and Liberal argument was about the F15 fighter jets. They both agreed on wanting to buy them, but one was willing to buy without engines and other with engines.

Of course, the NDP didn't want to fight any stinking fighter jets with our without engines!

The NDP has changed its position on that as well. They are now calling on the government to buy a different jet because we "need" them.

adma

JKR wrote:
adma wrote:

I'm wondering if there'll be an "official SoCon" in the race, i.e. someone representing the Woodworth Caucus--sort of like Tom Wappel relative to the federal Liberals...

Jason Kenney? I think he's the current front runner to replace Harper.

The kind of "official SoCon" candidate I have in mind is the sort that might throw its support to Kenney after the first or second ballot, rather than Kenney himself, who I suspect would play more of a Harper-esque "grand coalition" card...

Wilf Day

JKR wrote:
Jason Kenney? I think he's the current front runner to replace Harper.

Tomorrow's shuffle will show who's moving up, eh?

David Young

Neither Stephen Harper or Stockwell Day were sitting in Parliament when they became the leader of the (C)onservative Party.  Neither was Joe Clark in 2000.

I don't think any current M.P. has the upper edge when it comes to winning a Conservative Party leadership contest.  They seem to like someone who wasn't a sitting M.P.

 

 

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