Electoral Maps - 2011 Federal Election Poll-by-Poll Results

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adma

Though I haven't parsed all ridings yet, one other thing that's not apparent in riding maps is a sharp divide btw/e-day and the advance polls--for instance, if it were all about the advance polls, both Iggy and Duceppe would have held on solidly enough...

Krago

Counting only Advance Poll votes and votes under the Special Voting Rules (Group 1 and Group 2), the results would have been:

  • CONS - 159 - 41%
  • NDP - 76 - 24%
  • LIB - 60 - 23%
  • BQ - 12 - 7%
  • GRN - 1 - 3%
  • OTH - 0 - 1%

janfromthebruce

You are way too sweet Krago - have a great day Mr. Map maker! Kiss

 

Krago wrote:

I can't say no to a happy rural NDP member... Wink

Huron-Bruce - 2011 Federal Electoral Map

Huron-Bruce - 2007 Provincial Electoral Map

and you get Stratford and Owen Sound thrown in at no extra cost!

______________________________________________________________________________________ Our kids live together and play together in their communities, let's have them learn together too!

Vansterdam Kid

Hey, is there any way you could do a Greater Victoria map, and maybe a mid to north Vancouver Island map?

ScotianGuy1981

These maps will be fun to use for when the 2015 EDA are drawn up if the Census Data is available in time to see if there is any obvious Gerrymandering. Usually due to the fact Elections Canada is independent, Gerrymandering is difficult to prove but federally the most obvious is the rural-urban ridings of Saskatchewan which quartered up Saskatoon and Regina with the rural surroundings. 

 

Stockholm

The thing is that when the last redistribution occurred in 2002-2003 - the NDP wasn't so weak in the rural areas around Regina and Saskatoon like it is now - so at the time the map didn't seem so bad. Considering that the Liberals were in power federally and the NDP was in power in Saskatchewan at the time of the last redistribution - its hard to point to a Tory conspiracy.

ScotianGuy1981

Saskatchewan was actually an NDP Gerrymander that backfired, they thought it would equal more seats but they didn't forsee the twist of fate and their decline in rural Saskatchewan. 

Krago

I discovered a problem with the website that hosts all of my maps - it has no security!  So I will have to shut it down until I get it fixed early next week.

My apologies to all those addicts who will have to go cold turkey for the next few days.

Ippurigakko

Strong NDP polls in Ottawa-Vanier and would likely more vote NDP in 2015, Ottawa-Vanier is a franco-ontario,

I am curious, are French people (outside of Quebec) getting more and more NDP support?

pebbles

ScotianGuy1981 wrote:

These maps will be fun to use for when the 2015 EDA are drawn up if the Census Data is available in time to see if there is any obvious Gerrymandering. Usually due to the fact Elections Canada is independent, Gerrymandering is difficult to prove but federally the most obvious is the rural-urban ridings of Saskatchewan which quartered up Saskatoon and Regina with the rural surroundings. 

Elections Canada doesn't draw the boundaries.

pebbles

Stockholm wrote:

The thing is that when the last redistribution occurred in 2002-2003 - the NDP wasn't so weak in the rural areas around Regina and Saskatoon like it is now - so at the time the map didn't seem so bad. Considering that the Liberals were in power federally and the NDP was in power in Saskatchewan at the time of the last redistribution - its hard to point to a Tory conspiracy.

That's simply not true. The NDP has lost the rural area of the "rurban" ridings to Reform/CA/CPC in almost every contest since 1993.

What does the party in power provincially have to do with anything? Provincial governments have nothing to do with federal redistribution.

ottawaobserver

Pebbles, the NDP may have lost the rural areas around Regina and Saskatoon back then, but just not as badly as lately. The other difference is that the Liberals have since totally collapsed and can't soak up any of the Conservative vote either anymore.

Your comment about the NDP being asleep at the switch for the 1996 redistribution should take into account that it had just lost official party status and was mostly concerned about surviving at all. Granted, most of the 1993-1997 federal caucus was from Saskatchewan. But, while you say that provincial governments have nothing to do with federal redistribution, provincial parties were running the organization for the federal party back then, and tended to priorize accordingly.

Anyways, turning back to the present, I do wonder if people might not be in danger of always fighting the last redistribution battle, just like some parties are always fighting the last election. If the populations of Regina and Saskatoon are growing so much, and more of the formerly rural areas are becoming more ex-urban, isn't it at least possible that as the federal Conservatives become unpopular and Brad Wall wears out his welcome (say, by 2015) ... that by then the current boundaries wouldn't become advantageous for the NDP? I don't know that they would, but it's worth at least asking the question. We did hike our vote by 10 points or so in the province this past time -- do the poll-by-polls show any of that coming from the rural areas at all, or did we just intensify our support in the cities so much?

Threads

(Technically, it was only a seven-point vote hike over 2008.)  According to my big spreadsheet of estimates of how the NDP did in the cities of the prairies, the NDP got...

  • 19.59% in Estevan (12.01% in 2004, 11.77% in 2006, 18.51% in 2008),
  • 24.59% in Humboldt (19.66, 22.52, 23.70),
  • 20.16% in the Saskatchewan portion of Lloydminster (23.78, 17.41, 22.75)
  • 23.72% in Martensville (16.95, 20.44, 19.47),
  • 29.53% in Meadow Lake (13.07, 13.16, 14.91).
  • 23.59% in Melfort (22.03, 22.03, 22.92),
  • 27.09% in Melville (21.49, 26.54, 27.29),
  • 43.35% in Moose Jaw (38.00, 35.42, 37.32),
  • 37.85% in North Battleford (28.70, 22.70, 36.58),
  • 40.58% in Prince Albert (29.52, 26.84, 34.00)
  • 35.66% in Regina (27.40, 27.16, 26.71)
  • 42.88% in Saskatoon (28.28, 33.95, 33.11)
  • 23.11% in Swift Current (20.67, 19.95, 16.81)
  • 23.33% in Weyburn (20.29, 19.19, 22.75)
  • 21.72% in Yorkton (18.37, 19.79, 21.64)

I'd say at least some of that gain had to come from rural areas.

ottawaobserver

So, the biggest jumps were in Meadow Lake (15 points), Regina (10 points), Saskatoon (10 points), Prince Albert (7 points), Swift Current (6 points), Moose Jaw (6 points), and Martensville (4 points and a bit). The others showed up as insignificantly different from 2008, if I eyeballed it correctly.

You're right, now that I look at it Threads, about the 7 point hike rather than 10 overall provincially. What is telling is that we got a higher vote share in Saskatchewan (32.3%) than in Manitoba (25.8%), and still won no seats. Crazy.

ETA: And it looks like the Conservatives picked up about 2.5 of the combined 9.5 points dropped by the other two parties (6.5 points down for the Liberals and 3 from the Greens). We picked up the other 7 of them.

This means that winning seats for us now requires winning over Conservative votes, and/or getting better boundaries drawn.

Stockholm

It makes sense that the NDP picked up a lot in Meadow Lake since it is part of DMCR where in 2008 the NDP ran a token effort and came in a distant third compared to 2011 where it was a top target and the NDP vote ent from 17% to 44% across the riding!

Aristotleded24

Threads wrote:
(Technically, it was only a seven-point vote hike over 2008.)  According to my big spreadsheet of estimates of how the NDP did in the cities of the prairies, the NDP got...

  • 19.59% in Estevan (12.01% in 2004, 11.77% in 2006, 18.51% in 2008),
  • 24.59% in Humboldt (19.66, 22.52, 23.70),
  • 20.16% in the Saskatchewan portion of Lloydminster (23.78, 17.41, 22.75)
  • 23.72% in Martensville (16.95, 20.44, 19.47),
  • 29.53% in Meadow Lake (13.07, 13.16, 14.91).
  • 23.59% in Melfort (22.03, 22.03, 22.92),
  • 27.09% in Melville (21.49, 26.54, 27.29),
  • 43.35% in Moose Jaw (38.00, 35.42, 37.32),
  • 37.85% in North Battleford (28.70, 22.70, 36.58),
  • 40.58% in Prince Albert (29.52, 26.84, 34.00)
  • 35.66% in Regina (27.40, 27.16, 26.71)
  • 42.88% in Saskatoon (28.28, 33.95, 33.11)
  • 23.11% in Swift Current (20.67, 19.95, 16.81)
  • 23.33% in Weyburn (20.29, 19.19, 22.75)
  • 21.72% in Yorkton (18.37, 19.79, 21.64)

I'd say at least some of that gain had to come from rural areas.

Where could I find a list of similar statistics for the Manitoba cities of Selkirk, Dauphin, Brandon, Portage la Prairie, Winkler, Morden, and Steinbach?

Threads

Here's Manitoba (including Flin Flon, Thompson and Winnipeg).  As above, bracketed percentages are 2004-2006-2008 in that order.

  • Brandon: 32.32% in 2011 (27.25, 26.55, 21.78)
  • Dauphin: 30.65% in 2011 (22.06, 22.61, 18.32)
  • Flin Flon: 44.55% (54.56, 25.05, 40.43)
  • Portage la Prairie: 17.05% (18.00, 21.76, 12.30)
  • Selkirk: 32.53% (40.25, 47.85, 33.35)
  • Steinbach: 10.33% (4.15, 5.70, 7.00)
  • Thompson: 45.75% (52.53, 32.53, 49.33)
  • the NDP dead zone otherwise known as Winkler: 3.29% (2.32, 3.25, 1.89)
  • Winnipeg: 27.18% (26.32, 28.50, 27.43)

I didn't have Morden in the spreadsheet already (Wikipedia didn't list it as a city, and that's basically the principle I used for compiling the spreadsheet in the first place), but since it's also in Portage—Lisgar it was pretty easy for me to check.  My estimate for Morden is 8.34% in 2011 (7.50, 7.38, 5.29).

Aristotleded24

So Brandon, Dauphin, and Portage la Prairie show the most growth in the last election. I think Brandon, Dauphin, and Selkirk cities are winnable.

ottawaobserver

I must say, that Dauphin result is very gratifying. While we've held the seat provincially, the federal push there in the by-election has obviously had a lasting impact, which can perhaps be built on. Layton's visit there during the by-election seemed to have gone very well, as well, I hear.

Aristotleded24

Brandon is traditionally a staunch Conservative seat federally, having only elected a non-Conservative in 1993. Incidentally, the low-water mark for the right-wing in Brandon federally was in 1980 when the PC MP won with less than half the vote. Provincially it's traditionally Conservative, but the NDP is making inroads into Brandon, as evidenced by the NDP holding Brandon West from 1999-2007 and the fact that Shari Decter-Hirst defeated then-incumbent PC Mayor Dave Burgess. While I'm disappointed to see that the Conservatives still won Brandon, that 30% still is nothing to sneeze at. In 2003, the NDP also came close to sweeping the entire area provincially. If during the federal election that followed everyone voted federally the same way they had provincially, the NDP would have won.

The Dauphin-Swan River-Marquette seat is held provincially by NDP and PC MLAs. The right-wing brand has to be espeically tarnished before the riding will elect anyone other than a Conservative on a federal basis. This happened in 1980 as a backlash against the then-unpopular PC government of Sterling Lyon and in 1993 when the federal PC party was decimated and Reform ate into the right-wing vote.

I'm quite glad that someone sought to put some effort into Dauphin. Most other people would have said "Jack, it's a strong Conservative riding, that's how it will be afterwards, you're wasting your time." Thankfully, he did not listen, and I would hope that that campaign would bear fruit. Now, being that Layton is from Toronto and the by-election was held in the winter, maybe he would have won if he promised the soldiers at CFB Shilo would be responsible for local snow clearing! :p

ottawaobserver

There was just an announcement of a provincial candidate for Brandon West, wasn't there, Aristotled24? Who was that, and how will he do, do you think?

pebbles

ottawaobserver wrote:
Pebbles, the NDP may have lost the rural areas around Regina and Saskatoon back then, but just not as badly as lately.

I'm not so sure of that. The rural-urban pattern in SK is well-established. It certainly shows up in the 88 results.

Quote:
Your comment about the NDP being asleep at the switch for the 1996 redistribution should take into account that it had just lost official party status and was mostly concerned about surviving at all. Granted, most of the 1993-1997 federal caucus was from Saskatchewan.

Exactly. Asleep at the switch. It's not as if the implication wasn't blindingly obvious to anyone who wasn't trying to preserve that one particular riding's boundaries:

But, as ripe as the times should be for a big NDP comeback in Saskatchewan, other factors are conspiring against the party. Not the least of these is that federal riding redistribution has been absolutely vicious to the NDP here.
The 1993 election results in Saskatchewan were: five New Democrats, five Liberals and four Reformers.
If voters voted exactly the same way under the new 1997 boundaries, the results would be eight Liberals, four Reformers and two New Democrats.

That's from a Murray Mandryk column in the Star-Phoenix, before the 1997 writ drop.

Quote:
Anyways, turning back to the present, I do wonder if people might not be in danger of always fighting the last redistribution battle, just like some parties are always fighting the last election. If the populations of Regina and Saskatoon are growing so much, and more of the formerly rural areas are becoming more ex-urban, isn't it at least possible that as the federal Conservatives become unpopular and Brad Wall wears out his welcome (say, by 2015) ... that by then the current boundaries wouldn't become advantageous for the NDP?

The rural areas aren't exurbanizing at a fast enough rate to overcome the structural disadvantage of the "rurban" boundaries.

Quote:
I don't know that they would, but it's worth at least asking the question. We did hike our vote by 10 points or so in the province this past time -- do the poll-by-polls show any of that coming from the rural areas at all, or did we just intensify our support in the cities so much?

It could well be that the NDP vote rose in both the urban and rural polls, but as long as those rural and urban polls are lumped together, the Tories have a permanent structural advantage against the NDP and, in those occasional blips, sometimes Liberal candidates in the urban areas.

The Tories know this full well, and will do everything - EVERYTHING - to keep Regina and Saskatoon electorall drawn and quartered in the coming redistribution.

EV. RY. THING.

They will stop at NOTHING.

Don't say no one told you so, either! :)

pebbles

ottawaobserver wrote:
Pebbles, the NDP may have lost the rural areas around Regina and Saskatoon back then, but just not as badly as lately. The other difference is that the Liberals have since totally collapsed and can't soak up any of the Conservative vote either anymore.

Also, I just went back and checked my own research materials. Since the "rurban" map was put into place, in the five elections from 1997 to 2008 inclusive, the rural parts of the rurban ridings have voted at least a plurality for the Reformatory party (whichever one it happened to be at the time) in ALL EIGHT rurban ridings, in EVERY election, with only the exceptions of:

1997: Regina-Qu'Appelle and Saskatoon-Rosetown-Biggar (NDP pluralities both.)

2000: (three CA rural pluralities, five CA rural majorities)

2004: Wascana (Liberal plurality for Ralph); the crackpot ex-CA-turned-Independent took a plurality in rural Sask-Humbolt.

2006: (two CPC rural pluralities, six majorities)

2008: (CPC majorities across the board in rural areas)

 

By contrast, the urban results:

1997: 1 NDP majority, 2 Liberal pluralities, the rest NDP pluralities.

2000: 5 NDP pluralities, 1 Liberal plurality, 2 CA pluralities

2004: 1 Liberal majority, 2 Liberal pluralities, 4 NDP pluralities, 1 CPC plurality

2006: 4 CPC pluralities, 3 NDP pluralities, 1 Ralphie majority

2008: 1 NDP majority, 2 NDP minorities, 1 Ralphie majority, 4 CPC pluralities.

Somewhere I have the transposed 1993 results. Somewhere.

 

pebbles

Threads, I had it in my mind to do that same research, so thanks for letting me be lazy! Nice work! :)

Aristotleded24

ottawaobserver wrote:
There was just an announcement of a provincial candidate for Brandon West, wasn't there, Aristotled24? Who was that, and how will he do, do you think?

There's quite a story behind that. The incumbent, Rick Borotsik, is a popular former Brandon mayor. In 2007, he barely took that seat for the PCs despite his popularity, and had the NDP not messed up that campaign Borotsik would have lost. Borotsik is now stepping down, and given the Decter-Hirst victory, you would expect that seat to be a sure-fire NDP pick-up, wouldn't you?

So Jim Murray, who has been on the school board, was acclaimed as the NDP's candidate. Thing is, everyone I talk to would peg his politics as being more right-of-centre. What's more, the Liberals are running former school division trustee George Buri, who was originally thought to be considering a run for the NDP. Will the NDP machine pull it off? Can George Buri mount a serious challenge? Will Reg Helwer of the PCs get in on a vote split?

ottawaobserver

Interesting background on the Brandon seat; thanks, Aristotled24.

I guess I'll concede the point to Threads and Pebbles, and thanks for the rigourous efforts at documenting it. It had just seemed to me that with 30-some percent of the rural vote, incumbents were able to hang on to the northern Regina seats in 1997, plus Palliser. I originally attributed the 2000 loss to the absence of a PC candidate against the Cdn Alliance, but of course that situation was only going to get worse, wasn't it. If, as you say Pebbles, the exurbanization is not going that quickly, then there isn't a community of interest between the urban and rural communities, and the seats should be drawn as urban ones in any event.

adma

pebbles wrote:
Also, I just went back and checked my own research materials. Since the "rurban" map was put into place, in the five elections from 1997 to 2008 inclusive, the rural parts of the rurban ridings have voted at least a plurality for the Reformatory party (whichever one it happened to be at the time) in ALL EIGHT rurban ridings, in EVERY election, with only the exceptions of:

1997: Regina-Qu'Appelle and Saskatoon-Rosetown-Biggar (NDP pluralities both.)

2000: (three CA rural pluralities, five CA rural majorities)

2004: Wascana (Liberal plurality for Ralph); the crackpot ex-CA-turned-Independent took a plurality in rural Sask-Humbolt.

2006: (two CPC rural pluralities, six majorities)

2008: (CPC majorities across the board in rural areas)

By contrast, the urban results:

1997: 1 NDP majority, 2 Liberal pluralities, the rest NDP pluralities.

2000: 5 NDP pluralities, 1 Liberal plurality, 2 CA pluralities

2004: 1 Liberal majority, 2 Liberal pluralities, 4 NDP pluralities, 1 CPC plurality

2006: 4 CPC pluralities, 3 NDP pluralities, 1 Ralphie majority

2008: 1 NDP majority, 2 NDP minorities, 1 Ralphie majority, 4 CPC pluralities.

Somewhere I have the transposed 1993 results. Somewhere.

Well, plurality, schmurality.  In the end, it's all just a matter of degree--that is, if the NDP wants to win such seats in lieu of more favourable redistribution (hey, let's suppose), reducing the rural CPC plurality will do. Doesn't mean you actually have to win the hinterland, just make sufficient inroads in order to ballast the existing inherent urban advantage...

Stockholm

Let's keep in mind that any way you slice it - the next electoral map of Saskatchewan can only be better for the NDP. Ideally, the next map simply has three purely urban seats in each of Regina and Saskatoon. But even if the commission wants to keep having four ridings in each city - because there has been so much population growth in the cities and de-population in the rural areas - at the very least the commission would have to cut away rural chunks from the "rurban" ridings to make their population more equal to the popualtion of the rural seats in the province.

For all the talk about whether or not the NDP "blew it" with the last redistribution in Sask Its not clear that anything the NDP did at the time would have made any difference. The redistribution commissions are very independent and are under no obligation to pay any attention to submissions my political parties etc...

pebbles

Stockholm wrote:
For all the talk about whether or not the NDP "blew it" with the last redistribution in Sask Its not clear that anything the NDP did at the time would have made any difference. The redistribution commissions are very independent and are under no obligation to pay any attention to submissions my political parties etc...

No, but had the incumbent NDP not kicked up such a fuss about "Long Drive", the draft 1996 report might have been adopted instead of the redrawn one. What's that thing about rocking boats?

Threads

Did the 1996 Saskatchewan boundaries commission initially propose boundaries different from the ones that 1997 was ultimately conducted on?  (Your comment to "Long Drive" makes me think of the proposed Long Lakes riding from the 2003 draft, but you're referring to the 1996 commissions.)

adma

It puzzles me to no end that the NDP's so endlessly preoccupied with the Sask situation--but you have to realize: circumstances were different in the mid-90s, when it might even have been hoped that a Yorkton-Melville was still in play, rather than on a path t/w terminal 2/3 ReformAllianceConservative mandates.  Nobody realized that RefAllCon would keep going up and up and up in share.  Nobody realized that the Chretien/Martin Liberals would so brazenly "strategically" gouge out so much incumbent NDP base.  Right now, we're dealing with that legacy, *plus* Harper's "favourite Prairie son" advantage over Layton, *plus* Premier Wall's popularity and the current hapless state of the provincial NDP.  It isn't just unfavourably drawn boundaries, folks--sure, "urban" seats would help, but one can't help thinking of it as a last-ditch white-flag cop-out response.  At the very least, allow the reinstatement of more purely urban seats serve as a foundation for resurrecting the "grand coalition" circumstances of yore--maybe not that a Yorkton-Melville will be competitive ever again, but at least enough to halve the margin there...

E.P.Houle

Would someone explain why I can't view the maps.

Threads

Look for post #72 on this page; short story short, Krago discovered a problem with the hosting service he uses, and so he had to take everything down until he could get it solved.

Lens Solution

Elizabeth May's win in Saanich-Gulf Islands was certainly impressive.  I didn't think she could do it and I thought she would hand the seat to the Cons again, but she managed to obliterate Gary Lunn.  Not only did she beat him, but she beat him by 10 points.  I don't think anyone predicted that.  She even managed to get some of the Conservative vote in the riding.

Threads

This technically isn't a map and so might not be particularly on-topic, but I've already put half of the information in the following list in this topic, so why not put the whole thing together in one post?  (Includes the 16 cities entirely within Alberta, the 9 entirely within Manitoba, the 14 entirely within Saskatchewan, plus Lloydminster, Fort McMurray, and the two cities in BC's Peace River Regional District.)

  1. Thompson, Man.: 45.75%
  2. Flin Flon, Man.: 44.55%
  3. Moose Jaw, Sask.: 43.35%
  4. Saskatoon, Sask.: 42.88%
  5. Prince Albert, Sask.: 40.58%
  6. North Battleford, Sask.: 37.85%
  7. Regina, Sask.: 35.66%
  8. Lethbridge, Alta.: 33.11%
  9. Selkirk, Man.: 32.53%
  10. Brandon, Man.: 32.32%
  11. Dauphin, Man.: 30.65%
  12. Edmonton, Alta.: 30.31%
  13. Meadow Lake, Sask.: 29.53%
  14. Winnipeg, Man.: 27.18%
  15. Melville, Sask.: 27.09%
  16. Humboldt, Sask.: 24.59%
  17. Martensville, Sask.: 23.72%
  18. Melfort, Sask.: 23.59%
  19. Weyburn, Sask.: 23.33%
  20. Dawson Creek, B.C.: 23.18%
  21. Swift Current, Sask.: 23.11%
  22. Yorkton, Sask.: 21.72%
  23. Estevan, Sask.: 19.59%
  24. St. Albert, Alta.: 18.49%
  25. Fort St. John, B.C.: 18.43%
  26. Grande Prairie, Alta.: 17.27%
  27. Portage la Prairie, Man.: 17.05%
  28. Red Deer, Alta.: 16.86%
  29. Medicine Hat, Alta.: 16.75%
  30. Camrose, Alta.: 16.43%
  31. Fort McMurray, Alta.: 14.35%
  32. Wetaskiwin, Alta.: 13.41%
  33. Lloydminster: 13.11% (20.16% in the Sask. portion, 9.75% in the Alta. portion)
  34. Leduc, Alta.: 12.93%
  35. Spruce Grove, Alta.: 12.38%
  36. Calgary, Alta.: 12.35%
  37. Lacombe, Alta.: 11.52%
  38. Airdrie, Alta.: 11.24%
  39. Fort Saskatchewan, Alta.: 11.10%
  40. Cold Lake, Alta.: 10.94%
  41. Steinbach, Man.: 10.33%
  42. Brooks, Alta.: 8.21%
  43. Winkler, Man.: 3.29%

adma

Something seems *wrong*--spiritually, not statistically--about Fort McMurray being so low NDP.  (Though Fort Sask may be explainable through the CPC-vs-Ind. rematch hogging all the other-party energy.)

Threads

If you subscribe to the idea that NDP support is higher among the lower-turnout demographics than it is in the population as a whole, both the city in particular and the riding it's part of more generally having really bad turnout could explain at least some of the spiritual wrongness of the Fort McMurray numbers.

As far as Fort Saskatchewan goes, there was indeed a drop of about three points in 2008 over 2006.

MegB

Closed for length.

Krago

Witness the de-Gritification of Toronto:

Toronto - 2004 Electoral Map

Toronto - 2006 Electoral Map

Toronto - 2008 Electoral Map

Toronto - 2011 Electoral Map

Gotta love those NDP polls in Markham-Unionville!

Krago

Here is what an Orange Wave looks like:

Montreal - 2008 Electoral Map

Montreal - 2011 Electoral Map

 

P.S. Those gray blobs in Longueuil and La Salle-Emard are polls won by the Marxist-Leninists (according to Elections Canada).

Krago
Krago

I created these maps myself, using poll results and digital boundary files from Elections Canada.  I've left off riding names and street labels to avoid covering up data.

As requested, here are the maps for Winnipeg and South Shore-St. Margaret's.

Winnipeg - 2011 Electoral Map

South Shore-St. Margaret's - 2011 Electoral Map

Krago

And here's a personal favourite; a map of Windsor without a single speck of red!

Windsor - 2011 Electoral Map

Krago

Ask (politely) and ye shall receive:

Yukon and Western Arctic - 2011 Electoral Map

Krago
Krago

(The incredibly boring) Brandon-Souris - 2011 Electoral Map

(The far more exciting) Edmonton- 2011 Electoral Map

 
Remember at the start of the campaign when the BQ incumbent running against Romeo Saganash said that whites would never vote for a Cree candidate?  Well, Mr. Saganash did quite well in the southern portion of Abitibi--Baie-James--Nunavik--Eeyou.  It was the northern part where he had a close race.

  • Abitibi: NDP-44%, CONS-26%, BQ-18%, LIB-10%, GRN-2%
  • Baie-James: NDP-58%, BQ-25%, CONS-12%, LIB-4%, GRN-2%
  • Nunavik: NDP-30%, GRN-28%, LIB-21%, CONS-13%, BQ-8%
  • Eeyou: NDP-83%, LIB-8%, CONS-6%, BQ-2%, GRN-1%

Krago
Krago

oldgoat wrote:

Great stuff, thankyou!  I would love to see Oshawa (like I'm not depressed enough already) and the devolution over the past few elections.

So let it be written, so let it be done.

Oshawa - 2004 Electoral Map

Oshawa - 2006 Electoral Map

Oshawa - 2008 Electoral Map

Oshawa - 2011 Electoral Map

 

So, does this get me an official Babble Get-out-of-jail-free card? Laughing

Krago
Krago

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