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swallow swallow's picture

In real news: Georgina Jolibois’ bill to make Sept. 30 (orange shirt day) a national holiday for truth and reconciliation has passed the House of Commons. 

https://www.quesnelobserver.com/news/bill-passes-to-make-sept-30-national-day-for-truth-and-reconciliation-statutory-holiday/

Mighty Middle

Jagmeet Singh to publish his memoirs to be released prior to the election - book entitled "Love and Courage"

Tom Mulcair and Justin Trudeau did the same (publish a memoir) four years ago prior to the election.

NorthReport

Jagmeet Singh's NDP are going to tax the offshore tax-free havens (former Liberal Prime Minister Paul Martin / Canada Sreamships anyone?) to help pay for some of their proposed programs. Excellent!

https://environicsresearch.com/insights/nine-ten-canadians-think-morally-wrong-canadian-corporations-use-tax-havens-new-poll/

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Pondering wrote:

Party renewal isn't just about this election. Of course it would be great to do well in this election but the NDP has bigger issues to tackle. It is a house divided struggling with its identity. Singh may not be the leader that can bring the party together but neither were any of his opponents in the leadership race. I don't see anyone better than Singh in terms of uniting the party. 

I know it's difficult to wait for Singh to step up announcements. I'm getting impatient. I still think strategically he is doing the right thing. He is upping his visibility but not too much. His comments on SNC-Lavalin have been good. 

If I recall 2015 the parties were quiet on platforms until rumours started to abound that the election was going to be called early. I think that was around May/June and the election was called late July or early August which was considered a long election period. We are still in March. 

Singh did start saying more during his campaign for his seat but no one here discussed it. The following is very different from the kinds of things Mulcair used to say:

https://thetyee.ca/News/2019/02/20/Jagmeet-Singh-Lays-Line/

In Singh’s opinion the housing crisis now faced in places like Metro Vancouver and Toronto was caused by “consecutive Liberal and Conservative governments” who refused to invest in new affordable housing supply. Singh proposes building 500,000 co-op and non-market units and using the tax system to rein in the speculators who help drive up prices.

On pipelines he wants a new regulatory regime capable of denying projects that compromise Canada’s Paris climate targets, as well as the principles behind the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. He supports the idea of large-scale infrastructure investments, similar to those proposed in the Green New Deal framework, rapidly shifting Canada away from fossil fuels and towards 100 per cent renewable energy.

Singh believes it’s fundamentally unjust that less than 90 Canadian families have as much wealth as everyone in Newfoundland, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island combined. He wants to tax the rich more heavily, specifically by ending the capital gains exemptions and getting rid of the CEO stock option, in order to help close the gap.

“My goals,” Singh said in conclusion, “Are to reduce inequality, to tackle climate change and to build a more just and equitable society.......

I asked him why, given his answers to my questions, his website lacked much substance about the ideas and policies he supports. “There’s a certain amount that people want to know about me as leader,” he replied. “We’re planning on releasing a lot of our details and our platform well in advance of the [federal] election.”

I've been saying for ages that inequality is the key issue preventing progressive action. As long as the rich keep getting richer they will have more and more power. Climate change is the key divider between generations and the boomers are losing power to younger generations that put a much higher priority on the environment. Each successive generation feels more strongly about it. It may or may not help the NDP this election but longterm it is really easy to see that the party that gets out in front of this issue will broaden its support year by year. It has the potential to be a disruptor that crosses partisan lines in terms of its appeal to younger people. Housing crosses partisan lines and impacts almost everyone. He also touched on universal pharmacare. 

How he intends to address these issues will be shared through the platform. It is great that Trudeau has required the PBO to evaluate the platforms for fiscal plausibility. He shot himself in the foot on that one. Progressive policies are actually good for the economy. 

There's no longer any case for waiting.  It's going to be too late for anything he says to make any real difference if he holds off 'til the actual campaign.  Parties in opposition are SUPPOSED to use the time between elections to make a case for change.  When they don't to that, they waste the opportunity and end up focusing on things that can't make a difference to any part of the electorate like, say, endless parliamentary crusades to nail a powerless, irrelevant Conservative senator on corruption.

And I don't think I need to remind you that the NDP approach before and during the 2015 election led to comprehensive failure at the polls(other than in B.C., where there were gains, and congratulations to the candidates who made them, but gains too few to matter when weighed against the collapse in the Maritimes, Quebec, Ontario and Manitoba).  

robbie_dee

Quote:
OTTAWA – Struggling to field in all 338 ridings for the 2019 federal , the is now offering members who decide to run some free perks, including a ‘pretty nice’ brand tote bag.

“Just by signing up to run in Markham-Stouffvile or Fundy-Royal you will get this limited edition, environmentally friendly tote,” said leader as he lightly ran his fingers across the front, showing how soft the material is.

“You don’t even have to win. In fact, you almost certainly won’t! You just need to try your best,” Singh added.

Party brass were quick to point out how useful a good tote can be in this day and age. Members can use them for their grocery shopping, or to carry the binders of policy information they will need to prepare for their candidates’ debates.

Although a tote bag may seem like poor compensation for the months of work a candidate would need to do fundraising, giving speeches and canvassing, Singh was quick to point out that this tote bag had ‘super thick handles’ which means they won’t rip for at least a few years.

“Call now and we’ll even throw in same day shipping on the tote!” advised Singh, although it wasn’t clear exactly what phone number prospective candidates should call.

If the ‘tote’ strategy does not pay off for them, the NDP is confident they have other tricks up their sleeves. These include steak knives, two tote bags, and begging to run for them.

https://www.thebeaverton.com/2019/04/ndp-offers-free-tote-bag-to-any-mem...

Pondering

Ken Burch wrote:

 

There's no longer any case for waiting.  It's going to be too late for anything he says to make any real difference if he holds off 'til the actual campaign.  Parties in opposition are SUPPOSED to use the time between elections to make a case for change.  When they don't to that, they waste the opportunity and end up focusing on things that can't make a difference to any part of the electorate like, say, endless parliamentary crusades to nail a powerless, irrelevant Conservative senator on corruption.

And I don't think I need to remind you that the NDP approach before and during the 2015 election led to comprehensive failure at the polls(other than in B.C., where there were gains, and congratulations to the candidates who made them, but gains too few to matter when weighed against the collapse in the Maritimes, Quebec, Ontario and Manitoba).  

He isn't waiting. He has started highlighting the priorities of the party, the issues that will be addressed in the platform. 

In the olden days of the slow news cycle and thoughtful editorals opposition parties said more. Now elections are decided in the last few weeks based on platforms and very current events. Anything said in between is more likely than not to be cut up and used for attack ads. 

The NDP came within a hairsbreath of forming government in 2015. 

You do realize that Singh cannot afford to look like an angry man?

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Pondering wrote:

Ken Burch wrote:

 

There's no longer any case for waiting.  It's going to be too late for anything he says to make any real difference if he holds off 'til the actual campaign.  Parties in opposition are SUPPOSED to use the time between elections to make a case for change.  When they don't to that, they waste the opportunity and end up focusing on things that can't make a difference to any part of the electorate like, say, endless parliamentary crusades to nail a powerless, irrelevant Conservative senator on corruption.

And I don't think I need to remind you that the NDP approach before and during the 2015 election led to comprehensive failure at the polls(other than in B.C., where there were gains, and congratulations to the candidates who made them, but gains too few to matter when weighed against the collapse in the Maritimes, Quebec, Ontario and Manitoba).  

He isn't waiting. He has started highlighting the priorities of the party, the issues that will be addressed in the platform. 

In the olden days of the slow news cycle and thoughtful editorals opposition parties said more. Now elections are decided in the last few weeks based on platforms and very current events. Anything said in between is more likely than not to be cut up and used for attack ads. 

The NDP came within a hairsbreath of forming government in 2015. 

You do realize that Singh cannot afford to look like an angry man?

In what universe is losing over 50 seats "com(ing) within a hairsbreath of forming government"?

Whether or not Singh can sound like "an angry man", he has nothing to lose by a passionate, commited man who offers a REAL program for change.  And there's no good reason for his positon on Venezuela to be anywhere close to Trudeau and Scheer's-there's no "Left" case for U.S.-orchestrated "regime change", and no broad demand in Canada that the existing, elected president of Venezuela be removed from office and replaced by a Milton Friedman freak like Guaido.

NorthReport

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Pondering

Ken Burch wrote:

In what universe is losing over 50 seats "com(ing) within a hairsbreath of forming government"?

Whether or not Singh can sound like "an angry man", he has nothing to lose by a passionate, commited man who offers a REAL program for change.  And there's no good reason for his positon on Venezuela to be anywhere close to Trudeau and Scheer's-there's no "Left" case for U.S.-orchestrated "regime change", and no broad demand in Canada that the existing, elected president of Venezuela be removed from office and replaced by a Milton Friedman freak like Guaido.

NDP Foreign Affairs Critic, Guy Caron, issued the following statement:

"The NDP strongly deplores the Venezuelan constituent assembly’s decision to remove parliamentary immunity for Juan Guaido.

New Democrats are deeply concerned about politicizing judicial systems, the reversal of democratically-made decisions and the deterioration of human rights.

Only free and fair elections can bring a sustainable resolution to this political crisis, which is seriously impacting everyday life for people in Venezuela.

The Canadian government must work with its counterparts and partners to provide unconditional humanitarian aid, and ensure that available aid can enter the country and bring help to civilian populations.

The NDP reiterates its opposition to the use of force and military interventions in Venezuela; they will never be an appropriate response and will not foster political, social or economic stability.

We call on the Canadian government to show leadership and arrive at a diplomatic and peaceful solution."

Mulcair was in first place during the election period until he blew the deficit issue and refused the debates. 

I haven't seen any comments from the NDP suggesting regime change or installing Guaido. 

Unionist

Ken Burch - your efforts are appreciated, but you're wasting your breath.

See, that was a correct use of the English word "breath".

Not like Pondering's solipsistic neologism "hairsbreath".

Which I assume was supposed to be "hair's breadth".

But who cares, it's only words. 

Pondering

Unionist wrote:

Ken Burch - your efforts are appreciated, but you're wasting your breath.

See, that was a correct use of the English word "breath".

Not like Pondering's solipsistic neologism "hairsbreath".

Which I assume was supposed to be "hair's breadth".

But who cares, it's only words. 

Yes  I did indeed mean hair's breath. You managed to comprehend what I was saying despite my misspelling so it seems the goal of communication was achieved. You must be so smart to have figured it out!  The putdown, (or is it put down?) well either way that was downright clever of you. I had to look up the meaning of the word solip whatever but I couldn't care less. I care so little I am not even going to try to remember what it means. What I will remember is that people who use the solip word in any but an academic sense are full of hubris. Close enough.  I am not even going to bother with the neological shit. Old logical is fine by me. 

I do usually make an effort to use correct grammar and spelling. I am sorely tempted not to just to aggravate you, or is it agravate? No I think aggravate. Whatever, it looks right. Who cares anyway? Or is that Who care's anyway? Who knows! 

SNC-Lavilen, or was it SNC-Lavalin, I think Lavelin. Yeah that's it. From now on I will refer to SNC-Lavelin in your honor, or should I say honour, or maybe honeur? I like the sound of honeur. Makes me feel like a 3-musketeer. 

I really like this je ne sait quoi joie de vive sort of approach to writing. Lavelin, Levalen, what's in a name? Is not a rose still a rose? This is all so freeing I feel like a hippie. I know, I know, step away from the pipe. Just because it is Friday night is no reason to get all crazy with non-traditional spellings. What is this world coming to!

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Unionist her approach to words is the same as her approach to politics. She thinks that political philosophies like liberalism and democratic socialism and socialism are all the same and people like JWR have no fixed political views and therefore can be slotted into any party as leader with no concern for the views of the membership.

eastnoireast

hare's breath - like, you gotta get weally, weally, close to a hare to feel it's breath.

anyway, you're just splitting them. which is cruel to the wabbits.

Pondering

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Unionist her approach to words is the same as her approach to politics. She thinks that political philosophies like liberalism and democratic socialism and socialism are all the same and people like JWR have no fixed political views and therefore can be slotted into any party as leader with no concern for the views of the membership.

And you still think members of parties have power. The mix of hubris and naivete is amusing :)

I like hare's breath. 

P.S. Also enjoying the alternative views of JWR as either evil Liberal or indigenous Joan of Arc. 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Pondering wrote:

And you still think members of parties have power.

Your grasp of other people's views appears to be rather delusional.

Sean in Ottawa

Given the number of typos in my own posts that I often do not take the time to fix, I am very uncomfortable with spelling flames.

Interestingly: I have noticed how we type automatically -- I think there is some muscle memory in typing that sometimes comes out when it does not for pen on paper. I think the connection between sound and typing is somehow there as well. It is not as if people do not know the difference, for example, between there and their or hear and here but typing might actually have the wrong one come out.

There have been times when there was a joke I could have made related to a mispelling that I really (weally) wanted to make but held back for all these reasons as I cannot make it clear that I am going for the humour and not mocking the person for soemthing I could do myself.

And where again is a good spell check mechanism here? -- no, copying into word and back is just not viable.

Sean in Ottawa

Pondering wrote:

P.S. Also enjoying the alternative views of JWR as either evil Liberal or indigenous Joan of Arc. 

Interesting point -- there. I don't think that many people here think she is either. However, she is a symbol of a crisis in Canada around reconciliation. I cannot back away from that easily and I suspect others here who are very aware of her not being a social democrat feel similarly. My guess is that this perspective is shared by many in the NDP including the leader.

The NDP has made serious mistakes in candidates ... they could do worse than admit JWR. That said, there is a good argument to make that there are already other strong Indigenous voices within the NDP. Still, it is not my opinion that there are enough -- or near too many.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Actually the idea that there is a single "indigenous" politics is itself indicative of why we need more dialogue. Many indigenous leaders do not like JWR's acceptance of the treaty process and what they see as its fast track to assimilation while many others agree with her views and consider them pragmatic.

Strange how on this board Georgina Jolibois has no cachet as a indigenous woman's voice but a Liberal could lead the party.

 

Sean in Ottawa

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Actually the idea that there is a single "indigenous" politics is itself indicative of why we need more dialogue. Many indigenous leaders do not like JWR's acceptance of the treaty process and what they see as its fast track to assimilation while many others agree with her views and consider them pragmatic.

Strange how on this board Georgina Jolibois has no cachet as a indigenous woman's voice but a Liberal could lead the party.

There is no single Indigenous politics and more dialogue comes from more Indigenous voices being heard. This is not about a preference here.

I am not saying necessarily that JWR should be accepted but the NDP has accepted others who should not have been candidates. I can see the purpose of the consideration both for the NDP and for voters.

Unionist

JWR's claim to fame is that she is prepared to stand up for the "principle" of prosecutorial independence, even at the cost of her "dream job" (which is how she herself described her cabinet position).

If that suffices to make someone a member, or supporter - let alone leader - of a democratic socialist party, then we all need to take a significant quantity of pills, and wind down this progressive discussion site.

It would be hilarious if it weren't tragic.

 

Unionist

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

Given the number of typos in my own posts that I often do not take the time to fix, I am very uncomfortable with spelling flames.

I agree. I only ridicule spelling errors in the writing of self-important writers who can say and do no wrong. No danger that I will ever flame your spelling.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Actually the idea that there is a single "indigenous" politics is itself indicative of why we need more dialogue. Many indigenous leaders do not like JWR's acceptance of the treaty process and what they see as its fast track to assimilation while many others agree with her views and consider them pragmatic.

Strange how on this board Georgina Jolibois has no cachet as a indigenous woman's voice but a Liberal could lead the party.

 

I'm not sure Georgina Delabois has "no cachet" on this board..it's probably just that she hasn't been on the national news in the way JWR has been.  And in fairness, there has been a lot of skepticism as to whether JWR should be approached by the NDP or, for that matter if she'd even WANT to join the NDP(she may have been dropping a visual hint of her destiny when she word solid blue for her appearance before the committee).

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