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swallow swallow's picture

In real news: Georgina Jolibois’ bill to make Sept. 30 (orange shirt day) a national holiday for truth and reconciliation has passed the House of Commons. 

https://www.quesnelobserver.com/news/bill-passes-to-make-sept-30-national-day-for-truth-and-reconciliation-statutory-holiday/

Mighty Middle

Jagmeet Singh to publish his memoirs to be released prior to the election - book entitled "Love and Courage"

Tom Mulcair and Justin Trudeau did the same (publish a memoir) four years ago prior to the election.

NorthReport

Jagmeet Singh's NDP are going to tax the offshore tax-free havens (former Liberal Prime Minister Paul Martin / Canada Sreamships anyone?) to help pay for some of their proposed programs. Excellent!

https://environicsresearch.com/insights/nine-ten-canadians-think-morally-wrong-canadian-corporations-use-tax-havens-new-poll/

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Pondering wrote:

Party renewal isn't just about this election. Of course it would be great to do well in this election but the NDP has bigger issues to tackle. It is a house divided struggling with its identity. Singh may not be the leader that can bring the party together but neither were any of his opponents in the leadership race. I don't see anyone better than Singh in terms of uniting the party. 

I know it's difficult to wait for Singh to step up announcements. I'm getting impatient. I still think strategically he is doing the right thing. He is upping his visibility but not too much. His comments on SNC-Lavalin have been good. 

If I recall 2015 the parties were quiet on platforms until rumours started to abound that the election was going to be called early. I think that was around May/June and the election was called late July or early August which was considered a long election period. We are still in March. 

Singh did start saying more during his campaign for his seat but no one here discussed it. The following is very different from the kinds of things Mulcair used to say:

https://thetyee.ca/News/2019/02/20/Jagmeet-Singh-Lays-Line/

In Singh’s opinion the housing crisis now faced in places like Metro Vancouver and Toronto was caused by “consecutive Liberal and Conservative governments” who refused to invest in new affordable housing supply. Singh proposes building 500,000 co-op and non-market units and using the tax system to rein in the speculators who help drive up prices.

On pipelines he wants a new regulatory regime capable of denying projects that compromise Canada’s Paris climate targets, as well as the principles behind the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples. He supports the idea of large-scale infrastructure investments, similar to those proposed in the Green New Deal framework, rapidly shifting Canada away from fossil fuels and towards 100 per cent renewable energy.

Singh believes it’s fundamentally unjust that less than 90 Canadian families have as much wealth as everyone in Newfoundland, New Brunswick and Prince Edward Island combined. He wants to tax the rich more heavily, specifically by ending the capital gains exemptions and getting rid of the CEO stock option, in order to help close the gap.

“My goals,” Singh said in conclusion, “Are to reduce inequality, to tackle climate change and to build a more just and equitable society.......

I asked him why, given his answers to my questions, his website lacked much substance about the ideas and policies he supports. “There’s a certain amount that people want to know about me as leader,” he replied. “We’re planning on releasing a lot of our details and our platform well in advance of the [federal] election.”

I've been saying for ages that inequality is the key issue preventing progressive action. As long as the rich keep getting richer they will have more and more power. Climate change is the key divider between generations and the boomers are losing power to younger generations that put a much higher priority on the environment. Each successive generation feels more strongly about it. It may or may not help the NDP this election but longterm it is really easy to see that the party that gets out in front of this issue will broaden its support year by year. It has the potential to be a disruptor that crosses partisan lines in terms of its appeal to younger people. Housing crosses partisan lines and impacts almost everyone. He also touched on universal pharmacare. 

How he intends to address these issues will be shared through the platform. It is great that Trudeau has required the PBO to evaluate the platforms for fiscal plausibility. He shot himself in the foot on that one. Progressive policies are actually good for the economy. 

There's no longer any case for waiting.  It's going to be too late for anything he says to make any real difference if he holds off 'til the actual campaign.  Parties in opposition are SUPPOSED to use the time between elections to make a case for change.  When they don't to that, they waste the opportunity and end up focusing on things that can't make a difference to any part of the electorate like, say, endless parliamentary crusades to nail a powerless, irrelevant Conservative senator on corruption.

And I don't think I need to remind you that the NDP approach before and during the 2015 election led to comprehensive failure at the polls(other than in B.C., where there were gains, and congratulations to the candidates who made them, but gains too few to matter when weighed against the collapse in the Maritimes, Quebec, Ontario and Manitoba).  

robbie_dee

Quote:
OTTAWA – Struggling to field in all 338 ridings for the 2019 federal , the is now offering members who decide to run some free perks, including a ‘pretty nice’ brand tote bag.

“Just by signing up to run in Markham-Stouffvile or Fundy-Royal you will get this limited edition, environmentally friendly tote,” said leader as he lightly ran his fingers across the front, showing how soft the material is.

“You don’t even have to win. In fact, you almost certainly won’t! You just need to try your best,” Singh added.

Party brass were quick to point out how useful a good tote can be in this day and age. Members can use them for their grocery shopping, or to carry the binders of policy information they will need to prepare for their candidates’ debates.

Although a tote bag may seem like poor compensation for the months of work a candidate would need to do fundraising, giving speeches and canvassing, Singh was quick to point out that this tote bag had ‘super thick handles’ which means they won’t rip for at least a few years.

“Call now and we’ll even throw in same day shipping on the tote!” advised Singh, although it wasn’t clear exactly what phone number prospective candidates should call.

If the ‘tote’ strategy does not pay off for them, the NDP is confident they have other tricks up their sleeves. These include steak knives, two tote bags, and begging to run for them.

https://www.thebeaverton.com/2019/04/ndp-offers-free-tote-bag-to-any-mem...

Pondering

Ken Burch wrote:

 

There's no longer any case for waiting.  It's going to be too late for anything he says to make any real difference if he holds off 'til the actual campaign.  Parties in opposition are SUPPOSED to use the time between elections to make a case for change.  When they don't to that, they waste the opportunity and end up focusing on things that can't make a difference to any part of the electorate like, say, endless parliamentary crusades to nail a powerless, irrelevant Conservative senator on corruption.

And I don't think I need to remind you that the NDP approach before and during the 2015 election led to comprehensive failure at the polls(other than in B.C., where there were gains, and congratulations to the candidates who made them, but gains too few to matter when weighed against the collapse in the Maritimes, Quebec, Ontario and Manitoba).  

He isn't waiting. He has started highlighting the priorities of the party, the issues that will be addressed in the platform. 

In the olden days of the slow news cycle and thoughtful editorals opposition parties said more. Now elections are decided in the last few weeks based on platforms and very current events. Anything said in between is more likely than not to be cut up and used for attack ads. 

The NDP came within a hairsbreath of forming government in 2015. 

You do realize that Singh cannot afford to look like an angry man?

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Pondering wrote:

Ken Burch wrote:

 

There's no longer any case for waiting.  It's going to be too late for anything he says to make any real difference if he holds off 'til the actual campaign.  Parties in opposition are SUPPOSED to use the time between elections to make a case for change.  When they don't to that, they waste the opportunity and end up focusing on things that can't make a difference to any part of the electorate like, say, endless parliamentary crusades to nail a powerless, irrelevant Conservative senator on corruption.

And I don't think I need to remind you that the NDP approach before and during the 2015 election led to comprehensive failure at the polls(other than in B.C., where there were gains, and congratulations to the candidates who made them, but gains too few to matter when weighed against the collapse in the Maritimes, Quebec, Ontario and Manitoba).  

He isn't waiting. He has started highlighting the priorities of the party, the issues that will be addressed in the platform. 

In the olden days of the slow news cycle and thoughtful editorals opposition parties said more. Now elections are decided in the last few weeks based on platforms and very current events. Anything said in between is more likely than not to be cut up and used for attack ads. 

The NDP came within a hairsbreath of forming government in 2015. 

You do realize that Singh cannot afford to look like an angry man?

In what universe is losing over 50 seats "com(ing) within a hairsbreath of forming government"?

Whether or not Singh can sound like "an angry man", he has nothing to lose by a passionate, commited man who offers a REAL program for change.  And there's no good reason for his positon on Venezuela to be anywhere close to Trudeau and Scheer's-there's no "Left" case for U.S.-orchestrated "regime change", and no broad demand in Canada that the existing, elected president of Venezuela be removed from office and replaced by a Milton Friedman freak like Guaido.

NorthReport

.

Pondering

Ken Burch wrote:

In what universe is losing over 50 seats "com(ing) within a hairsbreath of forming government"?

Whether or not Singh can sound like "an angry man", he has nothing to lose by a passionate, commited man who offers a REAL program for change.  And there's no good reason for his positon on Venezuela to be anywhere close to Trudeau and Scheer's-there's no "Left" case for U.S.-orchestrated "regime change", and no broad demand in Canada that the existing, elected president of Venezuela be removed from office and replaced by a Milton Friedman freak like Guaido.

NDP Foreign Affairs Critic, Guy Caron, issued the following statement:

"The NDP strongly deplores the Venezuelan constituent assembly’s decision to remove parliamentary immunity for Juan Guaido.

New Democrats are deeply concerned about politicizing judicial systems, the reversal of democratically-made decisions and the deterioration of human rights.

Only free and fair elections can bring a sustainable resolution to this political crisis, which is seriously impacting everyday life for people in Venezuela.

The Canadian government must work with its counterparts and partners to provide unconditional humanitarian aid, and ensure that available aid can enter the country and bring help to civilian populations.

The NDP reiterates its opposition to the use of force and military interventions in Venezuela; they will never be an appropriate response and will not foster political, social or economic stability.

We call on the Canadian government to show leadership and arrive at a diplomatic and peaceful solution."

Mulcair was in first place during the election period until he blew the deficit issue and refused the debates. 

I haven't seen any comments from the NDP suggesting regime change or installing Guaido. 

Unionist

Ken Burch - your efforts are appreciated, but you're wasting your breath.

See, that was a correct use of the English word "breath".

Not like Pondering's solipsistic neologism "hairsbreath".

Which I assume was supposed to be "hair's breadth".

But who cares, it's only words. 

Pondering

Unionist wrote:

Ken Burch - your efforts are appreciated, but you're wasting your breath.

See, that was a correct use of the English word "breath".

Not like Pondering's solipsistic neologism "hairsbreath".

Which I assume was supposed to be "hair's breadth".

But who cares, it's only words. 

Yes  I did indeed mean hair's breath. You managed to comprehend what I was saying despite my misspelling so it seems the goal of communication was achieved. You must be so smart to have figured it out!  The putdown, (or is it put down?) well either way that was downright clever of you. I had to look up the meaning of the word solip whatever but I couldn't care less. I care so little I am not even going to try to remember what it means. What I will remember is that people who use the solip word in any but an academic sense are full of hubris. Close enough.  I am not even going to bother with the neological shit. Old logical is fine by me. 

I do usually make an effort to use correct grammar and spelling. I am sorely tempted not to just to aggravate you, or is it agravate? No I think aggravate. Whatever, it looks right. Who cares anyway? Or is that Who care's anyway? Who knows! 

SNC-Lavilen, or was it SNC-Lavalin, I think Lavelin. Yeah that's it. From now on I will refer to SNC-Lavelin in your honor, or should I say honour, or maybe honeur? I like the sound of honeur. Makes me feel like a 3-musketeer. 

I really like this je ne sait quoi joie de vive sort of approach to writing. Lavelin, Levalen, what's in a name? Is not a rose still a rose? This is all so freeing I feel like a hippie. I know, I know, step away from the pipe. Just because it is Friday night is no reason to get all crazy with non-traditional spellings. What is this world coming to!

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Unionist her approach to words is the same as her approach to politics. She thinks that political philosophies like liberalism and democratic socialism and socialism are all the same and people like JWR have no fixed political views and therefore can be slotted into any party as leader with no concern for the views of the membership.

eastnoireast

hare's breath - like, you gotta get weally, weally, close to a hare to feel it's breath.

anyway, you're just splitting them. which is cruel to the wabbits.

Pondering

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Unionist her approach to words is the same as her approach to politics. She thinks that political philosophies like liberalism and democratic socialism and socialism are all the same and people like JWR have no fixed political views and therefore can be slotted into any party as leader with no concern for the views of the membership.

And you still think members of parties have power. The mix of hubris and naivete is amusing :)

I like hare's breath. 

P.S. Also enjoying the alternative views of JWR as either evil Liberal or indigenous Joan of Arc. 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Pondering wrote:

And you still think members of parties have power.

Your grasp of other people's views appears to be rather delusional.

Sean in Ottawa

Given the number of typos in my own posts that I often do not take the time to fix, I am very uncomfortable with spelling flames.

Interestingly: I have noticed how we type automatically -- I think there is some muscle memory in typing that sometimes comes out when it does not for pen on paper. I think the connection between sound and typing is somehow there as well. It is not as if people do not know the difference, for example, between there and their or hear and here but typing might actually have the wrong one come out.

There have been times when there was a joke I could have made related to a mispelling that I really (weally) wanted to make but held back for all these reasons as I cannot make it clear that I am going for the humour and not mocking the person for soemthing I could do myself.

And where again is a good spell check mechanism here? -- no, copying into word and back is just not viable.

Sean in Ottawa

Pondering wrote:

P.S. Also enjoying the alternative views of JWR as either evil Liberal or indigenous Joan of Arc. 

Interesting point -- there. I don't think that many people here think she is either. However, she is a symbol of a crisis in Canada around reconciliation. I cannot back away from that easily and I suspect others here who are very aware of her not being a social democrat feel similarly. My guess is that this perspective is shared by many in the NDP including the leader.

The NDP has made serious mistakes in candidates ... they could do worse than admit JWR. That said, there is a good argument to make that there are already other strong Indigenous voices within the NDP. Still, it is not my opinion that there are enough -- or near too many.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Actually the idea that there is a single "indigenous" politics is itself indicative of why we need more dialogue. Many indigenous leaders do not like JWR's acceptance of the treaty process and what they see as its fast track to assimilation while many others agree with her views and consider them pragmatic.

Strange how on this board Georgina Jolibois has no cachet as a indigenous woman's voice but a Liberal could lead the party.

 

Sean in Ottawa

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Actually the idea that there is a single "indigenous" politics is itself indicative of why we need more dialogue. Many indigenous leaders do not like JWR's acceptance of the treaty process and what they see as its fast track to assimilation while many others agree with her views and consider them pragmatic.

Strange how on this board Georgina Jolibois has no cachet as a indigenous woman's voice but a Liberal could lead the party.

There is no single Indigenous politics and more dialogue comes from more Indigenous voices being heard. This is not about a preference here.

I am not saying necessarily that JWR should be accepted but the NDP has accepted others who should not have been candidates. I can see the purpose of the consideration both for the NDP and for voters.

Unionist

JWR's claim to fame is that she is prepared to stand up for the "principle" of prosecutorial independence, even at the cost of her "dream job" (which is how she herself described her cabinet position).

If that suffices to make someone a member, or supporter - let alone leader - of a democratic socialist party, then we all need to take a significant quantity of pills, and wind down this progressive discussion site.

It would be hilarious if it weren't tragic.

 

Unionist

Sean in Ottawa wrote:

Given the number of typos in my own posts that I often do not take the time to fix, I am very uncomfortable with spelling flames.

I agree. I only ridicule spelling errors in the writing of self-important writers who can say and do no wrong. No danger that I will ever flame your spelling.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Actually the idea that there is a single "indigenous" politics is itself indicative of why we need more dialogue. Many indigenous leaders do not like JWR's acceptance of the treaty process and what they see as its fast track to assimilation while many others agree with her views and consider them pragmatic.

Strange how on this board Georgina Jolibois has no cachet as a indigenous woman's voice but a Liberal could lead the party.

 

I'm not sure Georgina Delabois has "no cachet" on this board..it's probably just that she hasn't been on the national news in the way JWR has been.  And in fairness, there has been a lot of skepticism as to whether JWR should be approached by the NDP or, for that matter if she'd even WANT to join the NDP(she may have been dropping a visual hint of her destiny when she word solid blue for her appearance before the committee).

josh

At the heart of their platform, called "A New Deal for People," and shortened to NDP, is a pledge to reform Canada's health-care system to first include universal pharmacare and later another suite of services, like dental, eyecare and hearing.

Singh said it would save families who already have an insurance plan $550 a year.

To pay for the seismic shift, and other platform promises like drug decriminalization, the creation of 500,000
more affordable housing units, improved child care and enacting all recommendations of the missing and murdered Indigenous inquiry, the party is proposing a new one per cent wealth tax on those with a net worth of more than $20 million.

It's also promising to roll back corporate tax cuts brought in by previous governments to 2010 levels, increasing to 18 per cent from 15 per cent.

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/singh-ndp-speech-1.5177568

R.E.Wood

Here's a nice article on Svend:

Svend Robinson: ‘Our Last Chance to Turn Things Around’

Once the NDP’s radical star, he’s back with an agenda to rescue his party and planet.

https://thetyee.ca/News/2019/06/24/Svend-Robinson-Last-Chance-Turn-Thing...

I still think he would have made (and might yet make) a great leader for the NDP.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

If Svend gets the nomination in his riding, I'm probably gonna go up there and help doorbell for him.  

Debater

Svend won the nomination several months ago (he was acclaimed I think, since he was unopposed).

Terry Beech is the incumbent Liberal MP.

It would be better if the Liberals & NDP weren't fighting each other.  Could end up benefitting the Conservatives.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Debater wrote:

Svend won the nomination several months ago (he was acclaimed I think, since he was unopposed).

Terry Beech is the incumbent Liberal MP.

It would be better if the Liberals & NDP weren't fighting each other.  Could end up benefitting the Conservatives.

Thanks for clarifying that Svend was already nominated.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Paul Taylor was nominated in Parkdale High Park.  The article about Svend was very well done and led me to researching Paul a bit. Here is what his current job's website says about him.

Paul M. Taylor

Executive Director
paul@foodshare.net
416-363-6441 x228

"Food," says Paul, "is a fundamental human right." He has been a champion of social justice through leadership and his personal commitment to helping to create a more just and sustainable food system and world. Paul M. Taylor was hired as the Executive Director of FoodShare Toronto in April 2017.

Paul is the previous Executive Director of Gordon Neighbourhood House, a community organization based in the West End of Vancouver. Under his leadership, Gordon Neighbourhood House emerged as an innovator in operating community-based food initiatives, while also working to challenge the systems that maintain poverty. Paul uses humour, creativity and a sincere curiosity to inspire and connect with everyone that he meets.

Welfare reform and social programs are close to Paul; growing up in Toronto on Welfare as a child has shaped his vision on the right to food and set forth an activist path grounded in social justice and food security.

Paul has been a guiding force in the food security conversation for several years, his impact reaches far beyond regional or Provincial boundaries. His leadership journey began as a teacher in downtown Toronto and then as a Business Administration Instructor at a local college.

Paul’s previous work experience also includes serving as Executive Director for the Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House and prior to that at Second Base Youth Shelter. He has served on the board of the Metro Vancouver Alliance and is the founder of the Vancouver Food Summit. While living in Vancouver, Paul was also the Co-Chair of BC’s Poverty Reduction Coalition, a coalition of over 400 groups advocating for a comprehensive BC Poverty Reduction Strategy. He served on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (BC office). He is currently the Vice-Chair of Food Secure Canada.

https://foodshare.net/staff/paul-m-taylor/

This promo for his nomination campaign tells me he might do well.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EhDe9GNPmPA

 

Aristotleded24

kropotkin1951 wrote:
Paul Taylor was nominated in Parkdale High Park.  The article about Svend was very well done and led me to researching Paul a bit. Here is what his current job's website says about him.

Paul M. Taylor

Executive Director
paul@foodshare.net
416-363-6441 x228

"Food," says Paul, "is a fundamental human right." He has been a champion of social justice through leadership and his personal commitment to helping to create a more just and sustainable food system and world. Paul M. Taylor was hired as the Executive Director of FoodShare Toronto in April 2017.

Paul is the previous Executive Director of Gordon Neighbourhood House, a community organization based in the West End of Vancouver. Under his leadership, Gordon Neighbourhood House emerged as an innovator in operating community-based food initiatives, while also working to challenge the systems that maintain poverty. Paul uses humour, creativity and a sincere curiosity to inspire and connect with everyone that he meets.

Welfare reform and social programs are close to Paul; growing up in Toronto on Welfare as a child has shaped his vision on the right to food and set forth an activist path grounded in social justice and food security.

Paul has been a guiding force in the food security conversation for several years, his impact reaches far beyond regional or Provincial boundaries. His leadership journey began as a teacher in downtown Toronto and then as a Business Administration Instructor at a local college.

Paul’s previous work experience also includes serving as Executive Director for the Downtown Eastside Neighbourhood House and prior to that at Second Base Youth Shelter. He has served on the board of the Metro Vancouver Alliance and is the founder of the Vancouver Food Summit. While living in Vancouver, Paul was also the Co-Chair of BC’s Poverty Reduction Coalition, a coalition of over 400 groups advocating for a comprehensive BC Poverty Reduction Strategy. He served on the Board of Directors of the Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives (BC office). He is currently the Vice-Chair of Food Secure Canada.

https://foodshare.net/staff/paul-m-taylor/

This promo for his nomination campaign tells me he might do well.

">https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=EhDe9GNPmPA

One of his opponents actually ran for mayor of Toronto on an explicitly left-wing platform. Oh well, looks like a nomination contest between 2 people who were super great candidates. Too bad only one of them could have advanced. Contragulations to Paul, and look forward to seeing you as Parkdale's next MP.

NDPP

Shit Show in Toronto

https://dissidentvoice.org/2019/06/shit-show-in-toronto

"Alabama of the 50s and 60s has moved to Toronto. The ghost of South Africa has a consulate here. Israel's apartheid government must be jealous over how well Toronto's NDP runs its elections. So what the hell happened...?

It is no wonder the NDP polls at 12%."

robbie_dee

NDPP wrote:

Shit Show in Toronto

https://dissidentvoice.org/2019/06/shit-show-in-toronto

"Alabama of the 50s and 60s has moved to Toronto. The ghost of South Africa has a consulate here. Israel's apartheid government must be jealous over how well Toronto's NDP runs its elections. So what the hell happened...?

It is no wonder the NDP polls at 12%."

Quote:
People who had others pay the $5 membership fee were turned away because it didn’t come from their pocket.

Uh, those are the rules. It's supposed to prevent candidates from packing a nomination meeting with people who are not at all engaged or committed to the party but may have been paid to be there. It sounds like there may have been some other logistical snafus but comparing the NDP to "Alabama of the 50s and 60s" or "South Africa", while ridiculous on its face anyways, is particularly offensive here considering that the winning candidate, Paul Taylor, is also black. Not sure why "a veteran high school teacher in Prince George’s County, Maryland" is writing about an NDP nomination meeting in Toronto, Canada anyways.

josh

Nothing wrong with him writing about it.  He was just wrong.

pietro_bcc

Pretty ridiculous opinion piece, firstly by implying that the writer's prefered candidate lost for racial reasons and that Paul Taylor is the white person's candidate. Ignoring the fact that he's black and that the supposed "1960's Alabama" "lily white" voters had a white person to choose from and he lost. Secondly, by implying that there's something nefarious about trying to win the votes of Gebresellassi's supporters by leaving fliers in their building... That's a democracy, everyone is allowed to try and win the votes of whoever they want. And really the whole article, what a sore loser.

R.E.Wood

I'm sure some here will complain that this is written by a Liberal strategist, but truth is truth and the NDP platform launch was a bomb (did anyone here even talk about it?). 

The NDP campaign platform launch was a massive blunder

I had assumed that Singh and the NDP had made as many political mistakes as one politician was capable of making but then they go and exceed themselves.

There are four reasons that should be evident to anyone in politics as to why this was the wrong time to launch an election platform.

First, the Raptors. Bell Media said 15.9 million unique Canadian viewers tuned in at some point of Game 6 of the NBA Finals on Thursday, June 13. In Toronto and Hamilton, where NDP strategists planned to launch the platform, 82% of people watching television had the Raptors game on that night. ...

Second, Doug Ford. The Ontario premier is a gift that keeps on giving to both the provincial and federal NDP. The entire focus of the Ontario NDP convention should have been on Ford and nothing else.

Voters are steering away from Andrew Scheer in Ontario because of Ford. Singh should be fanning the flames and let the focus be on Ford this summer instead of what he might plan to do.

Third, roll out. The NDP launched a platform and had no roll out. Any political platform launch needs to be supported by a massive media presence and many roll-out events across the country. Another fail by Singh’s team.

Finally, tradition. It’s common practice that you launch a campaign platform at the beginning of the campaign in September. Think the Liberal Red Book of Jean Chretien. If you want to break with tradition, you could look at the success of Ford, who won a campaign with basically no platform at all.

Team Singh, already languishing in the polls, decided to do what no one has successfully done before — launch a campaign platform at the end of June hoping it dominates the picnic circuit and thrusts them to victory. Good luck with that.

All of this must frustrate Scheer and the Conservatives the most. They can’t control Ford, and they can’t help the NDP — both of whom right now are causing vote splits in favour of Justin Trudeau and the Liberals.

Campaigns and election platforms matter. They win and lose elections.

The NDP launched its platform at the worst possible time, and hardly anyone knows it even has one.

https://torontosun.com/opinion/columnists/warren-the-ndp-campaign-platfo...

NDPP

"When Jagmeet Singh ran to be leader of the NDP, he told me he supported sanctioning Israel for its violation of international law but said he needed time to determine what those sanctions should look like. He has now had ample time to figure that out."

https://twitter.com/dimitrilascaris/status/1147260222693617664

And demonstrated he had figured it out by helping crush a nominal BDS resolution at Convention. Why the NDP is dying. NDP=NoDifferenceParty.

R.E.Wood

I wonder if Singh reads the news from Burnaby? It's brutal, but true.

Burnaby South's Jagmeet Singh is pushing the NDP into irrelevance

Jagmeet Singh (now the MP for Burnaby South) ... has proven an utter gaffe.

In the last election, Trudeau was portrayed as just not ready, the least qualified to offer for the office of prime minister, but Singh eclipses that concern. On issue after issue he has been unconvincing and unconvinced in his position. He appears to not have an aide who stays abreast of the news to tell him about it. He has revived in unflattering ways the term “waffle” to the NDP. He and his party have not produced a single big idea to think about at the ballot box.

Moreover, while as leader he awaited a riding vacancy for nearly two years in which to seek a Commons seat, he didn’t borrow from Trudeau’s playbook and build relationships in touring the country.

Polls before elections carry question marks and asterisks, but the current batch suggest an NDP substantially reduced from its 44 seats in the 338-seat House of Commons, itself a sharp drop from that of 2011.

In British Columbia, where the NDP won 14 seats last time, about half of them are now unlikely. That would be its worst showing since 2004 – despite the presence of a provincial NDP government.

The real drama is in Quebec, where in 2015 Mulcair salvaged 15 of 59 seats secured under Layton in 2011, but where the party has since dropped roughly 15 points.

There might be but one, two or three seats to stay with the party there. Singh has not connected with the province, and his strategists now talk of Quebec as a lost cause.

We are all attracted to winning, so it should not surprise that the party’s MPs do not see the same opportunity in 2019 perceived last election. At last count, 11 of the 44 sitting NDP MPs will not contest office this fall. Coupled with three who resigned and one who was expelled, that totals more than one-third of the 2015 alumni – the highest attrition rate of any party with official status in the last six elections.

Many columnists have written the party off before, only to watch it rebound. Now, though, the left-of-centre has a more exuberant option in the Greens. Provincially its Albertan time came and went, its Ontario promise never materialized, and the Horgan government is its last stand.

The party has never before been so eroded from both sides with so little prospect of an uptick. You have to wonder if this is its last hurrah.

https://www.burnabynow.com/opinion/burnaby-south-s-jagmeet-singh-is-push...

R.E.Wood

More analysis from Burnaby that the "brains" in NDP HQ should be paying damn close attention to:

The federal NDP ... is headed for a cliff

The federal NDP, led by Burnaby South MP Jagmeet Singh, seems rudderless and adrift on increasingly stormy seas, as the federal election begins to hover into view. A record number of incumbent MPs have bailed on the party, it has a chronic fundraising problem and there is no evidence that its leader is connecting with voters.

Its 2011 breakthrough in Quebec, when it won 59 seats there, now seems like a mirage. The NDP dropped to just 16 seats in that province in 2015 and now appears set to lose most, if not all of them in October.

In fact, things seem so bad for the federal New Democrats that a number of seasoned observers have suggested the federal Green Party may be about to replace the NDP as the third party in the House of Commons come the October vote.

Indeed, a number of recent polls suggest the two parties are essentially tied in public support.

While I do not necessarily share the same lofty view of the federal Greens when it comes to winning seats, do not minimize the party’s potential ability to steal a significant amount of the NDP’s traditional support.

It can be argued the Greens may eat into the Liberals’ support as well, but that party seems to be picking up steam at just the right time. In fact, the Liberals may also attract would-be NDP voters who fear a potential Conservative Party victory.

How these shifting sands play out in B.C. will be interesting when voters head to the polls in October. The NDP will be challenged to hold on to such seats as Victoria, Skeena-Bulkley Valley and some of its ridings on Vancouver Island, where the Greens are strongest.

The Greens won the recent by-election in Nanaimo-Ladysmith, and it is hard to see the NDP reclaiming that seat in the fall. In fact, it may be lucky to finish even third in that riding.

The worst-case scenario for the NDP would be to drop below 12 seats, which would cost it its official party status. While that seems unlikely, it does seem there is the potential for a dramatic realignment in the non-Liberal/Conservative electorate.

https://www.burnabynow.com/opinion/the-bc-ndp-is-blowing-away-the-federa...

JeffWells

Despite the party's finanacial woes, Singh's done only one $25-dollar fundraiser all year. Svend Robinson says he's shocked and is going to be asking questions. Robinson had raised $10,000 just that afternoon.

https://www.huffingtonpost.ca/entry/jagmeet-singh-fundraisers-ndp_ca_5d2...

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

And once again, let us all remember that Singh-who I agree cannot be replaced before the election-was the candidate the party "pros" repeatedly insisted the party MUST choose as its leader...that he brought so much electoral magic with him that none of the other candidates could even be seriously considered.  

Thanks, party pros...the NDP owes it all to YOU!!!! 

Pondering

Read carefully:

NDP spokesman Guillaume Francoeur told HuffPost Canada that Singh has attended only one fundraiser in 2019, an event in March. 

“A $25 event in London–Fanshawe is the only ticketed event the leader took part in,” Francoeur said. There were other events at which donations were made, he added, but the events were free to attend. 

The only TICKETED event. Obviously the NDP is not doing well. I still don't see anyone else that would have done better. If Singh didn't introduce the platform then people would be complaining about that. In fact they have been complaining forever about not seeing policy. Now that policy exists no one is interested. Just like there was no interest in the MMIWG report. With the supporters on this site the NDP doesn't need enemies. If supporters see nothing good about the NDP I'm not surprised they are low in the polls. 

JeffWells

Pondering wrote:

The only TICKETED event.

Sure, that's how Francoeur frames it, and claims donations were made, albeit incidentally, at other events. But ticketed or not, that appears to be the only fundraising event.

This is simply abysmal, especially given Singh was sold as a fundraising machine.

Mighty Middle

JeffWells wrote:

This is simply abysmal, especially given Singh was sold as a fundraising machine.

The amount of members he signed up to win the leadership was a signal to the members that he would be a fundraising machine. But so far he hasn't taken this seriously, and the NDP has had to mortage their headquarters just to keep the lights on.

He has been missing in action last week and this week as the leaders have been full out campaigning at different events. It is like he is not even trying.

robbie_dee

Ken Burch wrote:

Singh-who I agree cannot be replaced before the election

Ken I agree with all of the rest of your comments above, and probably even this one, too. But I just wanted to remind everyone that in 2015 the BQ managed to dump Mario Beaulieu for Gilles Duceppe in mid-June, with the decision ratified by the party's general council on July 1 barely 3 1/2 months before the election. Times were pretty desperate for the BQ then, but arguably they are looking that way for the NDP now too. Perhaps Jagmeet's been sick or something and that's why he hasn't been able to make it to many fundraising events. If he had to "step back" from the leadership I'm sure the caucus or Party could come up with someone else to take the NDP into this fall's election even on very short notice. The new leader would have to be a senior figure in the party and a broad consensus choice, preferably not one of Jagmeet's prior leadership rivals. Svend Robinson, for example, comes to mind as the kind of person who could step forward under such circumstances.

Mobo2000

The fundraising numbers from the Huffpo article at post 89 are depressing : 

"Between Jan. 1 and March 31, 2019, the NDP raised $1.227 million from 13,713 contributors. The Tories raised $8.01 million in the period from 50,026 contributors, while the Liberals raised $3.857 million from 33,321 contributors. The Greens raised only $783,279 from 9,786 contributors. "

The Conservatives are outfundraising the Liberals 2 to 1, and have more individual donors as well.   Not sure how this compares to past years, but I was under the impression the Liberal party's fundraising was usually on par or a little below par with the Conservatives.

Fundraising has been a problem for the NDP for a few years now, they made some steps in 2015 to modernize their systems and approach, but it seems we're back to spam emails and not much else now.

R.E.Wood

Well, here is a glimpse into the NDP / Singh's Summer campaign strategy:

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh to swing through Brampton, Toronto on a tour of Liberal-held ridings this week

NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh will swing through the GTA this week on a tour of Ontario ridings his party thinks it can win from the Liberals, as the New Democrats embark on a summer offensive in a crucial battleground for the coming federal election.

Singh’s travels begin Tuesday in the western Toronto riding of York South—Weston, where he will tout the NDP’s proposal to earmark funds for flood mitigation, according to an itinerary the party provided to the Star on Monday. Local New Democrat candidate Yafet Tewelde is trying to unseat Liberal MP Ahmed Hussen, who won the riding from the NDP in 2015 and is now Canada’s immigration minister. 

On Wednesday and Thursday, Singh will canvass voters with local candidate Emilie Taman in Ottawa Centre, another former NDP seat that now belongs to a Liberal cabinet member. Environment Minister Catherine McKenna defeated New Democrat incumbent Paul Dewar there in 2015. 

After that, Singh plans to highlight his party’s climate plan in Welland, where former MP Malcolm Allen is trying a political comeback against the Liberal who defeated him in Niagara Centre in 2015. Singh will return to the GTA to attend the Carabram festival in Brampton — a key target region for New Democrats, since it is there where Singh began his political career as an Ontario MPP — and then finish off with a jaunt through Toronto—Danforth, the riding held by the late party luminary Jack Layton. 

The party said Singh was travelling from British Columbia Monday and not available for an interview, but NDP spokesperson Mélanie Richer said this week’s tour of select Ontario ridings is the opening stretch of a summertime jaunt to regions where the party believes in can gain seats this fall. 

Richer said Singh will tour Quebec next week, and visit the Atlantic later this summer, but will spend much of his July in the GTA and Toronto, a region painted almost entirely Liberal red in the 2015 election. A host of prominent New Democrats lost their seats in that vote, as the party that was the official opposition in Parliament for the first time was returned to third place with 44 seats in the House of Commons.

https://www.thestar.com/politics/federal/2019/07/08/ndp-leader-jagmeet-s...

R.E.Wood

Pondering wrote:

Obviously the NDP is not doing well. I still don't see anyone else that would have done better. 

You can stop saying that now, because there is absolutely no evidence to compare Singh's performance against the hypothetical performance any of the other leadership candidates might have delivered, or how they might have resonated with the Canadian public in the role of leader. 

One thing I do see is Svend Robinson being outspoken and unapologetic about criticizing the current NDP leadership whenever necessary, and I'm glad for it. I'm already prepared to join his leadership campaign. 

Mighty Middle

If Jagmeet is going to spend much of his July in 905, it would help if the party has their candidates nominated in that area. So far the NDP has not nominated a single candidate in Brampton. 

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Mighty Middle wrote:

If Jagmeet is going to spend much of his July in 905, it would help if the party has their candidates nominated in that area. So far the NDP has not nominated a single candidate in Brampton. 

More than fair point.  

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Mighty Middle wrote:

If Jagmeet is going to spend much of his July in 905, it would help if the party has their candidates nominated in that area. So far the NDP has not nominated a single candidate in Brampton. 

More than fair point.  

Unionist

R.E.Wood wrote:

One thing I do see is Svend Robinson being outspoken and unapologetic about criticizing the current NDP leadership whenever necessary, and I'm glad for it. I'm already prepared to join his leadership campaign. 

I was so thrilled when he announced he was back in the game that I actually sent him a donation. Can't believe I did that! Who knows... with Svend as leader, would I actually rejoin that party? Anyway, it's not gonna happen. 

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