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latest polling thread - 5 july, 2012

1934 replies [Last post]

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Brachina
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Joined: Feb 15 2012

NorthReport wrote:

Canadians will have a choice in the next election whether to vote to continue the policies of the right like Trudeau and Harper or to go with the NDP.

The most recent of the Liberal Party of Canada's Prime Ministers put his own companies offshore to avoid Canadian income taxes, Canada's labour laws, and Canada's environmental protection laws. If that is the kind of reprersentation you want in Ottawa by all means vote Liberal.

Times have changed since the Trudeau-Chretien era, and there is a new kid in town - his name is Mulcair. Laughing

 

Mulcai-led NDP is in 1st place in the latest poll, and  in 1st place or tied for 1st place in 3 of the 5 most recent polls - not too shabby! Smile

 

Seats

Date / Poll / NDP / Cons / Libs / BQ / Ind / Grn / Vacant / Total

Sep '12 / -- / 100 / 163 / 35 / 4 / 2 / 1 / 3 / 308

May '11 / GE / 103 / 166 / 34 / 4 / 0 / 1 / 0 / 308

Nov '08 / GE / 37 / 143 / 77 / 49 / 2 / 0 / 0 / 308

 

Popular Vote

Date /Pollster /NDP /N-Change /Cons /C-Change /Libs /L-Change / BQ / B-Change 

May '11 / GE / 31% / +13% / 40% / + 2% / 19% / -7% /

Oct 29 / Forum / 32% / +2% / 31% / -1% / 27% / +2% / 6% /

Oct 15 / Nanos / 28% / -2% / 33% / +1% / 30% / +5% / 5% /

Sep / Environics / 35% / Flatlined/ 31% / -2% / 20% / Flatlined / 9% / +2%

Sep / Forum / 30% / -4% / 35% / +1% / 25% / +3%

Sep 24 / Abacus / 35% / +3% / 35% / -2% /  17% / -3%

Sep 10 /  Harris Decima / 27% / -5% / 34% / +3% / 24% / +1%

Sep 9 / Nanos / 30.4% / +0.1% / 32.4% / -1.2% / 24.6%/ -1.9%

Aug 22 / Forum / 34% / -1% / 34% / +3% / 22% / Flatlined

Aug 12 / Abacus / 32% / -3% / 37% / +2% / 20% / Flatlined

Jul 26 / Forum / 35% / Flatlined / 31% / -4% / 22% / +3%

Jul 12 / Nanos / 30.3% / -3.3% / 33.6% / +0.1% / 26.5% / +1.6%

Jul 5 / EKOS / 32.3% / -0.1% / 30.2% / +0.9% / 19.5% / +0.3%

Jun 27 / Forum / 35% /--- / 35% / --- / 19% / ---

Jun 26 / EKOS / 32.4% / --- / 29.3% / --- / 19.2% / ---

Jun 23 / Abacus / 35% / --- / 35% / --- / 20% / ---

Jun 23 / Environics / 35% / --- / 33% / --- / 19% / ---

Jun 21 / Ipsos-Reid / 38% / --- / 35% / --- / 18% / ---

Jun 18 / Harris Decima / 32% / --- / 31% / --- / 23% / ---

Jun 16 / Angus Reid / 35% / --- / 34% / --- / 19% / --- 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/42nd_Canadian_federal_election

 

8430

 

This is the best news I've heard since Goofmania began, the NDP is still number one and at the point where Trudeau is already being refered to as the Liberal leader. The Ontario Liberal Lemmings are already falling all over themselves to fallow him, what are they going to do when the bubble bursts and the free ride to power ends?

NorthReport
Online
Joined: Jul 6 2008

Do we already have this poll?

Environics Research Group – September 27, 2012

Highlights

 The New Democrats (35%, unchanged since June) narrowly lead the Conservatives (31%, down 2 points since June) in national vote intention. This is consistent with Environics surveys released in May and in June of this year.

 The Liberals trail in third place, with the support of 20 percent of Canadians (unchanged). Nine percent support the Bloc Québécois (up 2 points) and five percent support the Green party (unchanged).

 

www.environics.com


Ippurigakko
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Joined: May 30 2011

Yeah nicky and Jeff already did post it in couple month ago


mark_alfred
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Joined: Jan 3 2004

Eric Grenier, from 308.com analysed the results of a recent Forum poll in a Huffington Post article.  Basically it's a three way race when party supporters are polled.  When the poll mentioned Trudeau, the Liberal numbers inflated putting them ahead.  However, Grenier expects, should Trudeau be chosen leader, that these numbers would settle back down and give us the situation of a three way horse race.  So, at this point it looks like the next election could be quite exciting.


NorthReport
Online
Joined: Jul 6 2008

If this, and if that.

And if the earth was flat, people would fall off the edge.

Meanwhile back to reality and the NDP is in 1st place in the latest poll.

Eric Grenier is no Nate Silver.

Grenier's anti-NDP political biases show up in just about ever article or so-called analysis he does, and the Huffington Post is basically a Liberal rag.


Arthur Cramer
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Joined: Nov 30 2010

Bang on NR!


adma
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Joined: Jan 21 2006

Though if it *were* a three-way situation, it sure would be interesting if one of the parties wound up 3rd place in votes, but 1st place in seats (has that ever happened?)


Brachina
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Joined: Feb 15 2012
Justin is a Zepplin, he maybe floating high right now, but he's full of hot gas, otherwise empty and with the right spark will crash and burn. Justin's popularity is a mile wide and a millmetre deep, while Mulcair is working on building something far more solid and deep. Mulcair is working towards the long term Justin is working towards immiadate ego gratification. As for Eric I think people are being hard on him, at least he acknowlsged that Trudeau's popularity is unlike to last at these levels, which is more then many in the MSM is willing to admit.

socialdemocrati...
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Joined: Jan 10 2012

The 308 has substantially improved. Not because they're projections are any better, but because he's finally asking the right questions about the polls themselves:

But there is something to note about this poll, similar to what I highlighted in Forum's last federal poll. The real problem is that Forum does not included unweighted and weighted samples in their reports (and they are not alone), which makes it difficult to determine what is actually going on. For instance, Forum says on one of its charts that the number of undecideds in this poll was 13%. But it also says that the total sample was 1,102 Ontarians and that, on the voting intentions question, the sample of respondents was 1,047. If the numbers of undecideds is really 13%, then the number of decided/leaning respondents who answered the voting intentions question should have been 959.

And on the question of how respondents voted in the last election, the numbers are off of the actual results - most strongly for the New Democrats, who were five points below their election result. By my rough calculation of Forum's numbers, if the sample was weighted by past voting behaviour the PC lead would be reduced to three points instead of five.

http://www.threehundredeight.com/2012/11/ontario-race-remains-between-pc...

 

I know this is a provincial poll, but it reaffirms the problems I pointed out with the other federal forum poll. They're underpolling New Democrats.


NorthReport
Online
Joined: Jul 6 2008

This most recent poll from Abacus (Sep 24) showing NDP tied with the Cons at 53% and the LPC at 17% has some good news for Mulcair

http://abacusdata.ca/2012/09/24/federal-politics-conservatives-and-ndp-t...

Tom Mulcair’s personal ratings improved slightly since August with 36% of Canadians saying they have a favourable impression of the NDP leader (up 5) while those viewing him unfavourably declined by 5.  He remains the only federal leader to have a net positive favourable rating.


socialdemocrati...
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Joined: Jan 10 2012

NorthReport wrote:

This most recent poll from Abacus (Sep 24) showing NDP tied with the Cons at 53% and the LPC at 17% has some good news for Mulcair

http://abacusdata.ca/2012/09/24/federal-politics-conservatives-and-ndp-t...

Tom Mulcair’s personal ratings improved slightly since August with 36% of Canadians saying they have a favourable impression of the NDP leader (up 5) while those viewing him unfavourably declined by 5.  He remains the only federal leader to have a net positive favourable rating.

And one very interesting thing...

The Liberals poll at 17%. And when you break it down by constituency, they're consistently in that ball park. Renter vs. Homeowner. Urban vs. Rural. All different levels of income. The Liberals consistently poll less than 20%. (Sometimes closer to 10%.)

The last area where Liberals overperform is with those born outside of Canada. They poll at nearly 30%. No other consistuency comes close. The NDP has some work to do there.

Second most interesting thing: there's not much difference between union and non-union households when it comes to voting NDP/Conservative/Liberal, and THAT is also something that needs a lot of work.


felixr
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Joined: May 6 2012

The NDP carries the epithet of "being too close to unions" but doesn't get union members votes. I don't think this is a coincidence. While union vs. non-union may help the NDP in some pockets, I think more union members vote in line with their (higher) incomes and other demographic factors, than their union status.


jerrym
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Joined: May 30 2009

In 308.com's analysis of the October 27 poll results his seat projections show strong growth for the NDP in BC, Prairie, Ontario and Atlantic seats although there is a substantial dropoff in Quebec seats. While such projections are to be taken with significant caution, what it does show if this were to bear out anywhere this is that the NDP would now have substantial support in every region of Canada and since it would only be 6 MPs less than the Cons  (124 C0ns to 118 NDP) quite capable of claiming power with Liberal support in the Commons while claiming it truly represents all regions of Canada. Since Eric's predictions tend to favour incumbents it is quite possible that these polling numbers would give the NDP the lead in elected MPs. We a long way from an election and these numbers are not that important, but it is still nice to see things moving in the right direction.

"The Liberals were in front in Atlantic Canada with 37%, narrowly edging out the NDP at 36%. The Conservatives were down 12 points to 22%.

With these numbers, the Conservatives would squeak out a bare plurality with 124 seats on the boundaries of the proposed 338-seat map. The New Democrats would win 118 seats, the Liberals 88, the Bloc Québécois seven, and the Greens one.

The NDP lost out on the chance to come out on top in the seat count due to the Tories' advantage (in both votes and geography) in Ontario and the close race in Quebec and Atlantic Canada. But with a combined 206 seats, the Liberals and NDP could likely come to some agreement.

http://www.threehundredeight.com/

 


David Young
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Joined: Dec 9 2007

Why do people automatically assume that the Liberals would support the NDP in a showdown with the Conservatives under such a scenario?

Given the way the Liberals voted time and time again to support the Conservatives between 2008 and 2011, there is just as much chance that the Liberals would offer their support to the Conservatives once again.

I would almost be willing to bet that a substantial portion of the Liberal caucus would rather split from the party than support an NDP government.

 


felixr
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Joined: May 6 2012

David Young wrote:

Why do people automatically assume that the Liberals would support the NDP in a showdown with the Conservatives under such a scenario?

Given the way the Liberals voted time and time again to support the Conservatives between 2008 and 2011, there is just as much chance that the Liberals would offer their support to the Conservatives once again.

I would almost be willing to bet that a substantial portion of the Liberal caucus would rather split from the party than support an NDP government.

My money is on the Liberals being closer to the Conservatives than the NDP, in a minority situation. Some MPS, like Scott Brison, are completely slavish in their dedication to the corporate lobbyists.


janfromthebruce
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Joined: Apr 24 2007

And that is exactly it - the last thing they want to do is prop the NDP in govt and essentially give them a boast in showing Canadians that the NDP can govern.

And although the Libs are one point ahead in Alantic Canada that is statistically insignificant and it would really depend on the vote splits and regions of support.


Winston
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Joined: Feb 17 2007

janfromthebruce wrote:

And that is exactly it - the last thing they want to do is prop the NDP in govt and essentially give them a boast in showing Canadians that the NDP can govern.

And although the Libs are one point ahead in Alantic Canada that is statistically insignificant and it would really depend on the vote splits and regions of support.

The NDP would need a very large lead indeed over the Liberals in Atlantic Canada to win the seat count.  Our vote tends to be extremely concentrated in the seats of our popular incumbents, with a lot of vote wasteage.  Having all of our votes work to give Peter Stoffer, Jack Harris and Yvon Godin even more massive super-majorities will not put us over the top anywhere else.


mmphosis
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Joined: Apr 28 2009

jerrym wrote:

In 308.com's analysis of the October 27 poll results his seat projections show strong growth for the NDP in BC, Prairie, Ontario and Atlantic seats although there is a substantial dropoff in Quebec seats. While such projections are to be taken with significant caution, what it does show if this were to bear out anywhere this is that the NDP would now have substantial support in every region of Canada and since it would only be 6 MPs less than the Cons  (124 C0ns to 118 NDP) quite capable of claiming power with Liberal support in the Commons while claiming it truly represents all regions of Canada. Since Eric's predictions tend to favour incumbents it is quite possible that these polling numbers would give the NDP the lead in elected MPs. We a long way from an election and these numbers are not that important, but it is still nice to see things moving in the right direction.

"The Liberals were in front in Atlantic Canada with 37%, narrowly edging out the NDP at 36%. The Conservatives were down 12 points to 22%.

With these numbers, the Conservatives would squeak out a bare plurality with 124 seats on the boundaries of the proposed 338-seat map. The New Democrats would win 118 seats, the Liberals 88, the Bloc Québécois seven, and the Greens one.

The NDP lost out on the chance to come out on top in the seat count due to the Tories' advantage (in both votes and geography) in Ontario and the close race in Quebec and Atlantic Canada. But with a combined 206 seats, the Liberals and NDP could likely come to some agreement.

http://www.threehundredeight.com/

 

So the NDP and the Bloc could form the government as a coalition 118 NDP + 7 BLoc = 125 vs only 124 Cons.


Brachina
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Joined: Feb 15 2012
The Bloc would never agree to join a coalition, even when the Liberals and NDP were trying to create a coalition the Bloc supported and refused to actual join it. Plus I'm not certain the Bloc will around next time, they might be, but why bother. Paille is no Gilles.

mark_alfred
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Joined: Jan 3 2004

mmphosis wrote:

So the NDP and the Bloc could form the government as a coalition 118 NDP + 7 BLoc = 125 vs only 124 Cons.

 

The Cons + Libs would have more seats than the NDP + Bloc.


Sean in Ottawa
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Joined: Jun 3 2003

Reminder over 99% of people refuse to answer polls. The 1% who do give their time becuase they are motivated. Before an election motivations are more equal among the parties and polling gets more accurate. Far from elections parties are not motivated to the same degree. A party in leadership mode would be expected to have a more motivated base for getting polling registered. A poll that compares one candidate to the field is even more likely to attract attention. Any Justin supporters would be falling over themselves to get polled as it helps their candidate whereas other parties' supporters are more likely to consider what else they might want to do with their time.


Sean in Ottawa
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Joined: Jun 3 2003

mark_alfred wrote:

mmphosis wrote:

So the NDP and the Bloc could form the government as a coalition 118 NDP + 7 BLoc = 125 vs only 124 Cons.

 

The Cons + Libs would have more seats than the NDP + Bloc.

Liberals rarely vote in minority parliaments as it could cause an election. ;-)


Sean in Ottawa
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Joined: Jun 3 2003

More seriously-- I would not make strong assumptions about who the Liberals would support in a minority parliament. Supporting either party would be a disaster for them-- to support the NDP crowns the NDP and to support the Conservatives would have them lose considerable support to the NDP.

The most likely scenario is that the Liberals do not bring a party to power but merely tolerate them there. In other words whichever party meets the House first has a reasonable chance of staying in power as the Liberals will be reluctant to bring them down to support another party. There are two rules that apply here: The outgoing party has the right to meet parliament first which implies the Cons have first kick at the can. However if the NDP had more seats then tradition is for an outgoing party that has not only lost a majority but also lost a plurality to resign and then the one with the most seats gets a shot -- but legally the last government does not have to hand over power if they choose to face the House and have a vote.

In this circumstance the Liberals could choose to keep their heads down and support whichever party meets the House first (or tolerate through abstention) or they could hold talks with both parties looking for the "best deal" they can get publicizing that they would work with either and simply want to secure the closest deal to their program.

So saying this-- until we know which party has the most seats and the dynamics including how many seats are between the Liberals and the second place party, we would not know what they would do and speculation is a series of  "ifs." Knowing the actual election platform of all three parties is another variable and so too would be the leadership situation (if any of the leaders resigned).


mark_alfred
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Joined: Jan 3 2004

Sean in Ottawa wrote:
In other words whichever party meets the House first has a reasonable chance of staying in power as the Liberals will be reluctant to bring them down to support another party.

 

I think you're right.  It would be typical of the stand-for-nothing sit-on-their-hands Liberal Party of Canada.


NorthReport
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Joined: Jul 6 2008

Now back to reality, and these are the latest polls.

Canadians will have a choice in the next election whether to vote to continue the policies of the right like Trudeau and Harper or to go with the NDP.

The most recent of the Liberal Party of Canada's Prime Ministers put his own companies offshore to avoid Canadian income taxes, Canada's labour laws, and Canada's environmental protection laws. If that is the kind of reprersentation you want in Ottawa by all means vote Liberal.

Times have changed since the Trudeau-Chretien era, and there is a new kid in town - his name is Mulcair. Laughing

 

Mulcai-led NDP is in 1st place in the latest poll, and  in 1st place or tied for 1st place in 3 of the 5 most recent polls - not too shabby! Smile

 

Seats

Date / Poll / NDP / Cons / Libs / BQ / Ind / Grn / Vacant / Total

Sep '12 / -- / 100 / 163 / 35 / 4 / 2 / 1 / 3 / 308

May '11 / GE / 103 / 166 / 34 / 4 / 0 / 1 / 0 / 308

Nov '08 / GE / 37 / 143 / 77 / 49 / 2 / 0 / 0 / 308

 

Popular Vote

Date /Pollster /NDP /N-Change /Cons /C-Change /Libs /L-Change / BQ / B-Change 

May '11 / GE / 31% / +13% / 40% / + 2% / 19% / -7% /

Oct 29 / Forum / 32% / +2% / 31% / -1% / 27% / +2% / 6% /

Oct 15 / Nanos / 28% / -2% / 33% / +1% / 30% / +5% / 5% /

Sep / Environics / 35% / Flatlined/ 31% / -2% / 20% / Flatlined / 9% / +2%

Sep / Forum / 30% / -4% / 35% / +1% / 25% / +3%

Sep 24 / Abacus / 35% / +3% / 35% / -2% /  17% / -3%

Sep 10 /  Harris Decima / 27% / -5% / 34% / +3% / 24% / +1%

Sep 9 / Nanos / 30.4% / +0.1% / 32.4% / -1.2% / 24.6%/ -1.9%

Aug 22 / Forum / 34% / -1% / 34% / +3% / 22% / Flatlined

Aug 12 / Abacus / 32% / -3% / 37% / +2% / 20% / Flatlined

Jul 26 / Forum / 35% / Flatlined / 31% / -4% / 22% / +3%

Jul 12 / Nanos / 30.3% / -3.3% / 33.6% / +0.1% / 26.5% / +1.6%

Jul 5 / EKOS / 32.3% / -0.1% / 30.2% / +0.9% / 19.5% / +0.3%

Jun 27 / Forum / 35% /--- / 35% / --- / 19% / ---

Jun 26 / EKOS / 32.4% / --- / 29.3% / --- / 19.2% / ---

Jun 23 / Abacus / 35% / --- / 35% / --- / 20% / ---

Jun 23 / Environics / 35% / --- / 33% / --- / 19% / ---

Jun 21 / Ipsos-Reid / 38% / --- / 35% / --- / 18% / ---

Jun 18 / Harris Decima / 32% / --- / 31% / --- / 23% / ---

Jun 16 / Angus Reid / 35% / --- / 34% / --- / 19% / --- 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/42nd_Canadian_federal_election

 

 


NorthReport
Online
Joined: Jul 6 2008

Canadian polling firm's ratings, based on the order of accuracy*, for their 3 most recent polls, if available, leading up to the May 2, 2011 federal election:

EKOS = -6

Forum Research = -7

Nanos Research = -7

Angus Reid = -9

Ipsos Reid = -9

Harris Decima = -13

Leger Marketing = -15

Environics = -16

Abacus = -18

Compas = -18

Innovative Research Group = -22

 

 

The 3 most recent poll results, if available, leading up to the last federal election held May 2, 2011

Popular Vote

Pollster / NDP / Cons / Libs

GE / 31 / 40 / 19

Forum / 33 / 36 / 19

Forum / 33 / 35 /19

Forum / 31 / 34 / 22

Average / 32 / 35 / 20

Difference / -1 / -5 / -1 = -7

EKOS / 31 / 34 / 21

EKOS 31 / 35 / 20

EKOS / 30 / 35 / 20

Average / 31 / 35 / 20

Difference / 0 / -5 / -1 = -6

Nanos / 32 / 37 / 21

Nanos / 31 / 37 / 23

Nanos / 31 / 36 / 22

Average / 31 / 37 / 22 

Difference / 0 / -3 / -3 = -7

Har Dec / 30 / 36 / 19

Har Dec / 30 / 35 / 22

Har Dec / 19 /36 / 28

Average / 26 / 36 / 23

Difference / -5 / -4 / -4 = -13

Abacus / 32 / 37 / 18

Abacus / 20 / 37 / 29

Abacus / 20 / 36 / 27

Average / 24 / 37 / 27

Difference / -7 / -3 / -8 = -18 

Compas / 26 / 46 / 17

Compas / 16 / 45 / 24

Average / 21 / 46 / 21

Difference / -10 / -6 / -2 = -18

Angus Reid / 33 / 37 / 19

Angus Reid / 30 / 35 / 22

Angus Reid / 25 / 36 / 25

Average / 29 / 36 / 22

Differece / -2 / -4 / -3 = -9

Leger / 31 / 36 / 21

Leger / 22 / 38 / 26

Leger / 18 / 37 / 26

Average / 24 / 37 / 24

Difference / -7 / -3 / -5 = - 15

Ipsos Reid / 33 / 38 / 18

Ipsos Reid / 24 / 43 / 21

Ipsos Reid / 19 / 41 / 26

Average / 25 / 41 / 22

Difference / -6 / 0 / -3 = -9

Inn Res Gp / 24 / 38 / 25

Inn Res Gp / 17 / 39 / 28

Inn Res Gp / 17 / 39 / 28

Average / 19 / 39 / 27

Difference /  -12 / -2 / -8 = -22

Envir / 25 / 39 / 22

Envir / 22 / 39 / 24

Envir / 20 / 38 / 25

Average / 22 / 39 / 24

Difference / -9 / -2 / -5 = -16

*Using the averages of their last 3 polls helps to avoid "herding" which means bringing their results more in line with other pollsters close to the actual election date

9656

 


Arthur Cramer
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Joined: Nov 30 2010

Tories 36, NDP 29, Libs 21. Libs up to 22, and at 21% in PQ; NDP down in PQ to 30%. Sigh. Of course, now the HP is writing about a Red Wave. Tom went down in favorability as well, and the LPC is licking its chops. I wish the National Party would get off its butt and start making its case. What the hell is it waiting for?


NorthReport
Online
Joined: Jul 6 2008

Take a look above at Abacus's polling record leading up to the last election.


NorthReport
Online
Joined: Jul 6 2008

There is a bit of an analysis above showing the accuracy, or lack thereof, of the various pollsters, in the run up to the last federal election.

And it is also worthwhile to check out the political connections of the principals involved with the various polling firms.

I wonder what the political connections are for Abacus. Wink

Quote:
David Coletto leads Abacus Data’s team of research consultants and strategists, delivering strategic advice and research design expertise to some of Canada’s leading corporations, advocacy groups, and political leaders. Coletto has over eight years experience working in the marketing research industry.

He has conducted research studies for organizations in many sectors including pharmaceutical, transportation, financial services, educational, natural resource, telecommunications, media, arts and cultural, tourism, and retail. He has also advised elected officials and senior-level decision makers at the federal, provincial, and municipal government levels.

abacus.ca

 

 

Seats

Date / Poll / NDP / Cons / Libs / BQ / Ind / Grn / Vacant / Total

Sep '12 / -- / 100 / 163 / 35 / 4 / 2 / 1 / 3 / 308

May '11 / GE / 103 / 166 / 34 / 4 / 0 / 1 / 0 / 308

Nov '08 / GE / 37 / 143 / 77 / 49 / 2 / 0 / 0 / 308

 

Popular Vote

Date /Pollster /NDP /N-Change /Cons /C-Change /Libs /L-Change / BQ / B-Change 

May '11 / GE / 31% / +13% / 40% / + 2% / 19% / -7% /

Nov '12 / Abacus / 29% /  -6% / 36% / +1%  / 22%/ +5%

Oct 29 / Forum / 32% / +2% / 31% / -1% / 27% / +2% / 6% /

Oct 15 / Nanos / 28% / -2% / 33% / +1% / 30% / +5% / 5% /

Sep / Environics / 35% / Flatlined/ 31% / -2% / 20% / Flatlined / 9% / +2%

Sep / Forum / 30% / -4% / 35% / +1% / 25% / +3%

Sep 24 / Abacus / 35% / +3% / 35% / -2% /  17% / -3%

Sep 10 /  Harris Decima / 27% / -5% / 34% / +3% / 24% / +1%

Sep 9 / Nanos / 30.4% / +0.1% / 32.4% / -1.2% / 24.6%/ -1.9%

Aug 22 / Forum / 34% / -1% / 34% / +3% / 22% / Flatlined

Aug 12 / Abacus / 32% / -3% / 37% / +2% / 20% / Flatlined

Jul 26 / Forum / 35% / Flatlined / 31% / -4% / 22% / +3%

Jul 12 / Nanos / 30.3% / -3.3% / 33.6% / +0.1% / 26.5% / +1.6%

Jul 5 / EKOS / 32.3% / -0.1% / 30.2% / +0.9% / 19.5% / +0.3%

Jun 27 / Forum / 35% /--- / 35% / --- / 19% / ---

Jun 26 / EKOS / 32.4% / --- / 29.3% / --- / 19.2% / ---

Jun 23 / Abacus / 35% / --- / 35% / --- / 20% / ---

Jun 23 / Environics / 35% / --- / 33% / --- / 19% / ---

Jun 21 / Ipsos-Reid / 38% / --- / 35% / --- / 18% / ---

Jun 18 / Harris Decima / 32% / --- / 31% / --- / 23% / ---

Jun 16 / Angus Reid / 35% / --- / 34% / --- / 19% / --- 

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/42nd_Canadian_federal_election

 

 


Brachina
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Joined: Feb 15 2012

Arthur Cramer wrote:

Tories 36, NDP 29, Libs 21. Libs up to 22, and at 21% in PQ; NDP down in PQ to 30%. Sigh. Of course, now the HP is writing about a Red Wave. Tom went down in favorability as well, and the LPC is licking its chops. I wish the National Party would get off its butt and start making its case. What the hell is it waiting for?

I agree AC, not to mention Tory attack ads. What's the NDP excutive doing sitting on thier hands instead of unleasing an ad campaign?

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