NDP Leader Jagmeet Singh

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Coldwell Coldwell's picture

Ken Burch wrote:

It doesn't matter why or how Singh was elected.  What matters is what he has done since what he intends on doing, and whether he should stay in the position he currently holds.  Also, it was a cheap shot to post an article dredging up, yet again, the non-issue of his views on what happened on an Air India flight WHEN HE WAS A CHILD.

If you want to help avoid an NDP disaster, then let's talk about that.  If you have issues with Singh due to his being a Sikh, you are not on the left or even the center-left and to my mind it might fairly be asked whether the hell you should be posting on a progressive board.

It's sadly indicative of the state of the NDP that thousands of long-time members who are deeply worried by the direction the Party has taken in the past 18 months should stand accused of pedalling right-wing conspiracy theories and anti-Sikh racism.  Alas, that is what comes of putting identity politics ahead of class and of showing a willful blindness toward the emergence of diaspora politics in Canada. These concerns have been voiced by respected analysts of Canadian politics, including Phil Resnick of UBC.  We ignore them at our peril.  After all, tens of thousands of members and supporters have stopped making financial contributions to the Federal NDP and are unwilling to vote for NDP candidates--hence the precipitous decline in NDP support in recent federal by-elections.  

It is no "paranoid conspiracy" to rccognize that a relatively unknown candidate, but one who was best known in his own community as an outspoken critic of the Indian government and its attitude toward Sikh separatists in India and abroad, won a stunning first-ballot victory after having signed up tens of thousands of new members through Sikh temples in Brampton, Mississauga, and Surrey. 

There's no need to rehash Singh's mishandling of the Air India questions he faced after having addressed rallies of pro-Khalistan activisits that featured images of Talwinder Singh Parmar, who masterminded the Air India bombing.  Singh's prolonged refusal to acknowledge Parmar's role in this atrocity did irreparable damage to him in the eyes of many ordinary citizens--as can be seen by the number of reader comments posted on mainstream news sites that rue the day the NDP elected such an unsuitable leader.  Yes, there are clearly racists among them but it is folly to paint all or most of them with that brush. 

To say that Singh had no obligation to address the issue on the grounds that "he was child" in 1985 is sheer nonsense.  I wasn't even born during the Second World War but I unreservedly condemn Naziism;  what's more, I would certainly expect to be questioned about it if I had attended and spoken at rallies organized by neo-Nazis in recent years.   

If it's an offence against the values of the Left to be troubled by these matters then the NDP is in need of a massive purge of its membership rolls.  But that may not be necessary as untold numbers have already chosen to sit on their hands if not exit the Party.  I'm not among them, though.  A member and active supporter since the early 1970s, I'm not going anywhere. In an era of unbridled corporate power that is literally taking humankind to the brink of extinction, the need for a democratic socialist party in Canada has never been more urgent. Getting the NDP back on track is an admittedly tall order and it certainly goes well beyond the shortcomings of the current leader. But Singh is unquestionably an unhelpful distraction. 

Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

Coldwell wrote:

To say that Singh had no obligation to address the issue on the grounds that "he was child" in 1985 is sheer nonsense.  I wasn't even born during the Second World War but I unreservedly condemn Naziism;  what's more, I would certainly expect to be questioned about it if I had attended and spoken at rallies organized by neo-Nazis in recent years.

How brave and virtuous of you to "unreservedly condemn Naziism", and how disingenuous of you to suggest that this is in any way analogous to Singh's issue with Sikh nationalism.

Coldwell Coldwell's picture

Michael Moriarity wrote:

How brave and virtuous of you to "unreservedly condemn Naziism", and how disingenuous of you to suggest that this is in any way analogous to Singh's issue with Sikh nationalism.

Nothing brave about it. My point is that politicians don't get to avoid taking a position on political events that occurred before they were grown-ups.  As for the analogy I was drawing, the equivalence lies in condemning mass murder in the service of a political ideology (Nazi atrocities versus the bombing of a civilian airliner) and having to answer for one's attendance at political events where such atrocities are celebrated or condoned.  

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
I wasn't even born during the Second World War but I unreservedly condemn Naziism;  what's more, I would certainly expect to be questioned about it if I had attended and spoken at rallies organized by neo-Nazis in recent years.

I guess my question for you would be "what is it you think the Nazis were fighting for that has merit?"

I don't think your answer could be "Aryan independence".

But I wonder what you think of Palestinian independence.  Do you see a need for them to be free, or do you see only the rocket attacks?

Also, do you believe it is incumbent on all NDP candidates to start their candidacy by firmly and clearly denouncing communism wherever it has been attempted?  Or else what would make that unnecessary, while Singh denouncing Sikh independence is necessary?  Do any white guys have shit they need to own, Coldwell?

Coldwell Coldwell's picture

Mr. Magoo wrote:

I guess my question for you would be "what is it you think the Nazis were fighting for that has merit?"

I don't think your answer could be "Aryan independence".

But I wonder what you think of Palestinian independence.  Do you see a need for them to be free, or do you see only the rocket attacks?

Also, do you believe it is incumbent on all NDP candidates to start their candidacy by firmly and clearly denouncing communism wherever it has been attempted?  Or else what would make that unnecessary, while Singh denouncing Sikh independence is necessary?  Do any white guys have shit they need to own, Coldwell?

I don't see the relevance of any of your questions based on what I actually wrote. They strike me as a series of non sequiturs. I can see that the danger of replying to them is to invite more of the same.

No wonder the democratic left is in such dire straits. The ordinary people from whom the left needs to win support can only look askance at such rhetorical contortions. 

 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
I don't see the relevance of any of your questions based on what I actually wrote.

If I had been basing them on what you wrote I'd have asked why this need for renunciation only applies to POC, but I didn't want to seem rude.

gadar

Trump is trying to force a bad deal on Canadians, and our government is right to take the time it needs to get this deal right. Like we’ve said all along we need a deal that protects Canadian workers and industry.

: Jagmeet Singh on twitter

https://twitter.com/theJagmeetSingh/status/1035654535178539009

gadar

It may have been tough tweleve months, but I think he can turn it around

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/opinion/article-the-many-travails-of-ndp...

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..with mulcair pipelines where a priority for the country. no way he was alone in making this decision. he had to be supported by the majority of the caucus if not all. i posted that announcement the day after he made it from calgary. he made this announcement in spite of the ndp's understanding of indigenous rights and the climate crisis.

..my point in stating this once again is today their position is reversed. my point is that it doesn't matter if you're for or against pipelines. my point is that the ndp is changeable when pressured from communities. 

..democracy may never come to the ndp. the top down structures don't allow it. but that is not the only important consideration. no other party can be altered in the way the ndp can be. probably the greens could be but they don't have the political position the ndp has..multiple mps, mlas and even a gov or 2.

..lots of talk about the ndp going down. lots of complaints about the new leader. come voting time people better understand that things could be worse without an ndp you don't like. for most of my adult life that describes me. if i can do it for all those years so can you.

..what real choice have you today. it will take years for the greens to come up to this level. and there is no new party on the horizon. welcome to the politics of the day.

gadar

Singh standing in solidarity with the workers. Where is Howdy Doody on the labour day.

https://twitter.com/theJagmeetSingh/status/1036677765250965504

josh
robbie_dee
gadar
R.E.Wood

Oh, I'd love to respond to this, but I took myself off the email list quite a while back. As I'm sure have lots of other people who don't like Singh, or the direction of the party. So I expect the results of this poll will be not only unscientific, but completely unhelpful. Of course they won't release the results, so who knows.

NDP survey asks supporters to rate Jagmeet Singh in first year as party leader

https://www.theglobeandmail.com/politics/article-ndp-survey-asks-support...

 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
So I expect the results of this poll will be not only unscientific, but completely unhelpful.

FWIW, every survey has to expect some potential respondents to not wish to respond.  That would include those who choose not to respond when asked to, and also those who choose to not ever be asked to.

But I'm just curious, R.E.Wood:  are you saying right now that the results of this poll mean nothing because of you and others choosing not to weigh in?  Can you answer that TODAY, and stand by your answer regardless of the actual results, assuming your wrong and they're released?

In other words, do you think the methodology is flawed if the poll says "we love him!", but the methodology must be sound if the poll says "we don't love him!"? 

R.E.Wood

I'm just saying that by this point a lot of the people who were in the party and were not/are not happy with Singh's leadership may well have done what I've done, which is to unsubscribe from the emails. Thus those people won't receive the opportunity to voice their anti-Singh vote in this particular internal party poll. 

R.E.Wood

Chantal Hebert muses about Singh's (mis)fortunes, and repeats the suggestion that the NDP could turf him before the election. Quotes & link:

As the NDP’s fortunes slide, Singh battles to stay on top

"Were the federal New Democrats to conduct a leadership review this fall, Jagmeet Singh would likely be handed his walking papers.

... When Singh won a first-ballot victory last October, the New Democrats knew he would have a hard time hanging on to the party’s fragile Quebec beachhead. But that was also true of the other leadership aspirants. 

Given that, many New Democrats clung to the assumption that Singh — as the first main federal leader to be issued from the ranks of Canada’s visible minorities — would be best placed to make up for potential Quebec losses with gains in the diverse communities of suburban Canada.

On the eve of the first anniversary of the leadership vote, that hope comes across as little more than wishful thinking. The New Democrat polling numbers are dismal across the board — as are the party’s fundraising returns

Singh is estranged from the Alberta wing of his party over irreconcilable differences as to the merits of the Trans Mountain pipeline expansion.

He has also become persona non grata in party circles in Saskatchewan, the provincial cradle of the NDP.

... Still the main reason so many New Democrats on and off Parliament Hill are not willing to cut Singh as much slack as that granted his predecessors hits closer to home.

If there is a common theme to the discontent that is seeping out of the party’s caucus room, it is that Singh who only served at the provincial level prior to taking on the federal leadership is in over his head.

He would not be the first provincial star to fail to thrive on Parliament Hill. Until recently though it would have been considered politically suicidal to think of ousting a leader in the immediate lead-up to his or her first election campaign.

But that was before the Ontario Tories ditched Patrick Brown mere months before landing a majority government at Queen’s Park."

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/star-columnists/2018/09/07/as-the-ndps-f...

josh

Article is pretty much spot on.  The sooner the Burnaby election is held, the better for the party.

JeffWells

R.E.Wood wrote:

I'm just saying that by this point a lot of the people who were in the party and were not/are not happy with Singh's leadership may well have done what I've done, which is to unsubscribe from the emails. Thus those people won't receive the opportunity to voice their anti-Singh vote in this particular internal party poll. 

This is precisely my situation, too. I guess we've already voiced our displeasure, and the party executive should factor in the number of unsubscriptions since Singh's election to more accurately gauge disaffection. But I don't think they really want to do that.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

If a PBS supporter is unhappy with the way PBS is going, would it make more sense to stop financially supporting PBS, or just stop watching it?

Perhaps you've done both.  But is the NDP really supposed to look at their mailing list, look at how many people have opted out of it, and conclude "it's Singh's fault they don't want our stuff in their inbox any more, so something must be done to return the party to being the kind of party that people want spammy e-mails from!"?

I think, in order:

1.  They'd like your vote

2.  They'd like your moral support

3.  They'd like your financial support

4.  They'd like you to receive their broadcast e-mails

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

The NDP produces more spam than any other organization that I know of and every single thing from them is wrapped around a fund raising message. That is the party apparatus not the leader.

josh

“I went to one of Singh’s meetings in Regina and was totally underwhelmed,” Nystrom said. “Someone asked him about the economy and he ended up talking about love and courage.”

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/star-columnists/2018/09/10/jagmeet-singh-digging-himself-a-deep-hole.html

R.E.Wood

I've just taken the time to write to a couple of our NDP MP's letting them know my unhappiness with the current state of the party and specifically that I am appalled by Singh's leadership. I including a quote from Lorne Nystrom in the article Josh shared in post #73: “As long as Singh’s there, I won’t be involved in the federal party,’ said Nystrom. “I will not donate.”
 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..not sure what's going on in the party now but for many years nystrom represented the right of the party.

eta..legit or not this smacks of maneuvering going on in the party. there's games afoot.

Aristotleded24

josh wrote:

“I went to one of Singh’s meetings in Regina and was totally underwhelmed,” Nystrom said. “Someone asked him about the economy and he ended up talking about love and courage.”

https://www.thestar.com/opinion/star-columnists/2018/09/10/jagmeet-singh-digging-himself-a-deep-hole.html

Strange that Singh would rather show love and courage to a crazy lady who wants him run out of the country simplybecause of who he is than show any to his colleagues in the leadership race who had legitimate questions about his policy positions or his strategy, or to Erin Weir.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..no one can deny that the last leadership campaign pulled the party to the left. i don't expect those looking for the 3rd way would be happy with that. if singh were to resign that gets a reset. it would be easy to piggy back on the animosity towards singh that already exists to make it worse. nystrom was in that 3rd way camp. 

..maybe i'm just being overly suspicious but i don't think so. when singh used that love thing before. when he was being heckled it worked for him. 

eta:..the more i think about it the more i'm sensing power struggles within the party. the weir thing has nothing to do with singh other than he's the leader and he has to deal with it. it's the caucus or a majority of it that doesn't want weir but it's singh getting hung out to dry for it. 2nd..the km pipeline. some powerful ndp folks in alta and sask want a pipeline. singh is opposed. if he goes his opposition to it goes as well. a reset.

Aristotleded24

epaulo13 wrote:
..no one can deny that the last leadership campaign pulled the party to the left. i don't expect those looking for the 3rd way would be happy with that. if singh were to resign that gets a reset. it would be easy to piggy back on the animosity towards singh that already exists to make it worse. nystrom was in that 3rd way camp.

How did it pull the party to the left? The only platform plank Singh proposed was a means tested income program for seniors, and means testing is contrary to social democratic principles the NDP stands for? The candidate who was most rhetorically to the left, Niki Ashton, couldn't even crack 20% of the vote within the NDP.

And what specific things has Nystrom said or done that you would consider him to be part of the 3rd way?

Aristotleded24

epaulo13 wrote:
it's the caucus or a majority of it that doesn't want weir but it's singh getting hung out to dry for it. 2nd..the km pipeline. some powerful ndp folks in alta and sask want a pipeline. singh is opposed. if he goes his opposition to it goes as well. a reset.

When Singh entered the race, he didn't have a clear position on the pipeline (or anything else, for that matter). He only came out against it after it was clear that there would be more votes to oppose rather than favour. Why would you trust someone who came to a position in that way? Of course he says he's against the pipelines because that's what the NDP base wants to hear. What's to say he isn't going to buckle on that issue upon being elected and going the other way? And if Singh is deposed, there will be a viable, credible candidate for leadership who represents the segment of the party that opposes pipelines.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Aristotleded24 wrote:

epaulo13 wrote:
..no one can deny that the last leadership campaign pulled the party to the left. i don't expect those looking for the 3rd way would be happy with that. if singh were to resign that gets a reset. it would be easy to piggy back on the animosity towards singh that already exists to make it worse. nystrom was in that 3rd way camp.

How did it pull the party to the left? The only platform plank Singh proposed was a means tested income program for seniors, and means testing is contrary to social democratic principles the NDP stands for? The candidate who was most rhetorically to the left, Niki Ashton, couldn't even crack 20% of the vote within the NDP.

And what specific things has Nystrom said or done that you would consider him to be part of the 3rd way?

..the campaign acknowledged what was happening with corbyn and sanders and followed suit. this is a shift to the left. the question of who to vote for was one of who people thought was the most electable. which is different than the most left candidate even if it's rhetorical. even with that means testing singh's overall position is to the left of mulcair.

..as for nystrom i've known of his behaviours for a long time. what your asking is for some kind of example of what i'm talking about. i don't have that at my fingertips because my memory doesn't work like that. but i will endeavour to get it for you.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..tried but can't produce a smoking gun on nystrom. but i'm not going to back away from my comments either. nystrom was well known for his centrist views. and he ran mulcair's leadership campaign who at the time publicly embraced tony blair's approach.

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Aristotleded24 wrote:

epaulo13 wrote:
it's the caucus or a majority of it that doesn't want weir but it's singh getting hung out to dry for it. 2nd..the km pipeline. some powerful ndp folks in alta and sask want a pipeline. singh is opposed. if he goes his opposition to it goes as well. a reset.

When Singh entered the race, he didn't have a clear position on the pipeline (or anything else, for that matter). He only came out against it after it was clear that there would be more votes to oppose rather than favour. Why would you trust someone who came to a position in that way? Of course he says he's against the pipelines because that's what the NDP base wants to hear. What's to say he isn't going to buckle on that issue upon being elected and going the other way? And if Singh is deposed, there will be a viable, credible candidate for leadership who represents the segment of the party that opposes pipelines.

..you've got me wrong ari. i'm not defending singh per say. i joined the party and voted for nicki. singh ran with the promise to do big things including raising money. he made his bed and can't deliver it seems. i'm trying to point out there's other forces at work..some nefarious i suspect. which makes this not as simple as making judgement calls re singh.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

ari...as for the pipeline. the bc ndp had to be dragged to oppose the km project. the same reasons they give to oppose it, indigenous rights, they violate around site c dam and lng. a court ruling will come down in the not to distant future around site c that is said will be influenced by the recent km decision. i don't trust politicians. i'm a firm supporter of those movements that have forced the bc and the fed ndp to take positions. 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Of course he says he's against the pipelines because that's what the NDP base wants to hear.

Huh.  Until now, much of the criticism of him has been that he won't say what the NDP base wants to hear.

What if he calls for the nationalization of industry?  Or pharmacare?  A $20/hr minimum wage?  Is everyone ready to dismiss and reject that sort of crass pandering?

SeekingAPolitic...

I am sorry but did miss something, it been sometime I posted here. Perhaps we went through grand experiment by our elite scientists that bent time and space.  So maybe I now liveing in demenison where up is down and down is up.  Becasue when left I my home demenison I thought Signh was perhaps at best what I would call centre left candidate.  Now people believe he is canadiate of the left.  Has he stopped talking about  how love is key to our problems rather I dont know for example we destroying the myth that live in classless society. 

Martin N.

To me, Singh is personifying the same glib, opportunistic dickwad characteristics that the nation already has too much of in its political makeup. Is it impossible for any candidate to campaign on principle rather than weaselry and fakery?

In this regard, Maxime Bernier may well attract supporters who will flesh out a party committed to principled policy, not empty virtue signaling and abject vote pandering.

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Martin N. wrote:

To me, Singh is personifying the same glib, opportunistic dickwad characteristics that the nation already has too much of in its political makeup. Is it impossible for any candidate to campaign on principle rather than weaselry and fakery?

In this regard, Maxime Bernier may well attract supporters who will flesh out a party committed to principled policy, not empty virtue signaling and abject vote pandering.

His "principles", though, are the total opposite of anyone who'd even consider voting NDP.

Martin N.

Ken Burch wrote:

Martin N. wrote:

To me, Singh is personifying the same glib, opportunistic dickwad characteristics that the nation already has too much of in its political makeup. Is it impossible for any candidate to campaign on principle rather than weaselry and fakery?

In this regard, Maxime Bernier may well attract supporters who will flesh out a party committed to principled policy, not empty virtue signaling and abject vote pandering.

His "principles", though, are the total opposite of anyone who'd even consider voting NDP.

To be successful in attracting talented individuals to the new party, Bernier will certainly need to water his wine and accept other opinions.

This new party is a novel concept in that it is a grassroots undertaking rather than replacing the face of an existing party with an entrenched management system. It is an attraction nationally rather than a rump party focused on parochial interests.

 

quizzical

Martin N. wrote:

To be successful in attracting talented individuals to the new party, Bernier will certainly need to water his wine and accept other opinions.

This new party is a novel concept in that it is a grassroots undertaking rather than replacing the face of an existing party with an entrenched management system. It is an attraction nationally rather than a rump party focused on parochial interests

"a novel concept"? are you serious?

ummmm....even i remember the last right wing "novel concept" party.

"parochial" now isn't it quaint of you to use this.

loads of crap right there in your promotional speech.

 

Martin N.

quizzical wrote:

Martin N. wrote:

To be successful in attracting talented individuals to the new party, Bernier will certainly need to water his wine and accept other opinions.

This new party is a novel concept in that it is a grassroots undertaking rather than replacing the face of an existing party with an entrenched management system. It is an attraction nationally rather than a rump party focused on parochial interests

"a novel concept"? are you serious?

ummmm....even i remember the last right wing "novel concept" party.

"parochial" now isn't it quaint of you to use this.

loads of crap right there in your promotional speech.

And.....loads of absolutely nothing in your response. Sneering isn't yet a communications skill but keep trying.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

In what specific way is it a "grassroots" undertaking?

Seems to me it started with just one single blade of grass, yes?  The very fact that it seems to be regarded as "Bernier's" party kind of belies the idea that it started with and ends with The People.

Martin N.

Mr. Magoo wrote:

In what specific way is it a "grassroots" undertaking?

Seems to me it started with just one single blade of grass, yes?  The very fact that it seems to be regarded as "Bernier's" party kind of belies the idea that it started with and ends with The People.

Ok, ok. I shall edit your picayunimous nuisancery to " grassroot". It is a 'grassroot' undertaking in the sense that, in order to succeed, Bernier will need to attract like minded individuals at a [grassroot to grassroot to grassroot] hopefully to the fourth power to attract a full slate of candidates.

Or, conversely, he finds an influence peddler to grubstake buying off enough junior phone chimps to push the Bernier grassroot through the meadow muffins into the sweet smell of graft in the air.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
picayunimous nuisancery

As an aside, do you see yourself as a good Scrabble player?

Quote:
conversely, he finds an influence peddler to grubstake buying off enough junior phone chimps to push the Bernier grassroot through the meadow muffins into the sweet smell of graft in the air.

Uh.  I assume you're speaking metaphorically?

quizzical

Martin N. wrote:

quizzical wrote:

Martin N. wrote:

To be successful in attracting talented individuals to the new party, Bernier will certainly need to water his wine and accept other opinions.

This new party is a novel concept in that it is a grassroots undertaking rather than replacing the face of an existing party with an entrenched management system. It is an attraction nationally rather than a rump party focused on parochial interests

"a novel concept"? are you serious?

ummmm....even i remember the last right wing "novel concept" party.

"parochial" now isn't it quaint of you to use this.

loads of crap right there in your promotional speech.

And.....loads of absolutely nothing in your response. Sneering isn't yet a communications skill but keep trying.

i sure did fill it full guess you just didn't like the filing or didn't get the nuances.

i indicated this Bernier party was reform party 2.1 and nothing novel.

called bs on your use of parochial to indicate people who didnt follow the new righteous path were narrow minded and simple or too "Christian.

for icing i inserted another "right" novel party name coming after the reform...

think it was pretty fabulous communication all in all.

Martin N.

Coldwell wrote:

Mr. Magoo wrote:

I guess my question for you would be "what is it you think the Nazis were fighting for that has merit?"

I don't think your answer could be "Aryan independence".

But I wonder what you think of Palestinian independence.  Do you see a need for them to be free, or do you see only the rocket attacks?

Also, do you believe it is incumbent on all NDP candidates to start their candidacy by firmly and clearly denouncing communism wherever it has been attempted?  Or else what would make that unnecessary, while Singh denouncing Sikh independence is necessary?  Do any white guys have shit they need to own, Coldwell?

I don't see the relevance of any of your questions based on what I actually wrote. They strike me as a series of non sequiturs. I can see that the danger of replying to them is to invite more of the same.

No wonder the democratic left is in such dire straits. The ordinary people from whom the left needs to win support can only look askance at such rhetorical contortions. 

 

Another evasion of a craftily disguised rabbithole, Magoo. You need to up your game - the low hanging fruit has been picked.

Martin N.

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Quote:
picayunimous nuisancery

As an aside, do you see yourself as a good Scrabble player? No, I have the attention span of a gnat. I do opine that I am a good chess player. Unfortunately, I am the only person on the planet that hold such an opinion.

Quote:
conversely, he finds an influence peddler to grubstake buying off enough junior phone chimps to push the Bernier grassroot through the meadow muffins into the sweet smell of graft in the air.

Uh.  I assume you're speaking metaphorically? Where would I be without metaphor, simile, non sequitur and a proclivity for spouting latin no one including myself makes any pretense of understanding.

Martin N.

quizzical wrote:

Martin N. wrote:

quizzical wrote:

Martin N. wrote:

To be successful in attracting talented individuals to the new party, Bernier will certainly need to water his wine and accept other opinions.

This new party is a novel concept in that it is a grassroots undertaking rather than replacing the face of an existing party with an entrenched management system. It is an attraction nationally rather than a rump party focused on parochial interests

"a novel concept"? are you serious?

ummmm....even i remember the last right wing "novel concept" party.

"parochial" now isn't it quaint of you to use this.

loads of crap right there in your promotional speech.

And.....loads of absolutely nothing in your response. Sneering isn't yet a communications skill but keep trying.

i sure did fill it full guess you just didn't like the filing or didn't get the nuances.

i indicated this Bernier party was reform party 2.1 and nothing novel.

called bs on your use of parochial to indicate people who didnt follow the new righteous path were narrow minded and simple or too "Christian.

for icing i inserted another "right" novel party name coming after the reform...

think it was pretty fabulous communication all in all.

Clever as your use of google is, the Oxford Unabridged ( the one held together with stove bolts) is rather more substantial in digesting the contextual nuances involved in the archaic prose I am prone to espouse.

Rather than criticise your fabulous effort, may I rather direct your attention to the fact that Reform, Bloc etc have more in common with parochialism than they do with M. Bernier's attempt at moulding a national party.

NorthReport

Jagmeet Singh says he's faced barriers to change within NDP

https://www.ctvnews.ca/politics/jagmeet-singh-says-he-s-faced-barriers-t...

NorthReport

Jagmeet Singh Wants Trudeau Liberals To Cancel Trans Mountain Pipeline

 

Singh said the government must abandon plans for the expansion of the Trans Mountain pipeline.

“Instead, let’s invest in bold renewable energy projects that would help, rather than hinder, efforts to meet our climate change targets, and create jobs for today’s workers and future generations,” he said.

“The Liberals’ approach to reviewing energy projects like the Trans Mountain expansion has been to adopt the Harper process, the process they promised to change. We need to overhaul that process to ensure that all environmental impacts are considered and that First Nations are fully consulted,” he said.

“The only difference between the Conservative and the Liberal approach is the $4.5 billion the Liberals used to buy a pipeline no one else wanted,” said Singh. “That decision didn’t help workers, it didn’t help the environment, and it didn’t help Canada’s finances. It only helped the shareholders of Kinder Morgan.”

http://thelinkpaper.ca/?p=70221

NorthReport

Five questions with federal NDP leader Jagmeet Singh

With the NDP's priorities freshly aligned following a caucus retreat in B.C., the National Post sat down with Singh to discuss his strategy leading up to the 2019 election

https://nationalpost.com/news/politics/five-questions-with-federal-ndp-l...

NorthReport

Singh might do quite well, particularly in BC, during the next federal election. J50 could become a rallying cry against inadequate FEDERAL environmental protection laws. And with the Liberal defection to the Conservatives in Ontario, are we possibly heading for a minority government?

Can they build Trans Mountain while respecting Indigenous rights and protecting orcas?

http://rabble.ca/news/2018/09/can-they-build-trans-mountain-while-respec...

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