Our Food Industry Which Includes Our Dairy Industry is Killing Us

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Pogo Pogo's picture

They are from the same place but that area has a bunch of small scale cheese makers (kinda like brew pubs).  In my grocery stores there will be the cheese beside the milk and sour cream (Kraft, Armstrong Brand and private label).  Then there will be the cheese kiosk by the deli.  I go there when I am entertaining pick up something I cannot afford and hope that there is some left when the guests are gone. The deli kiosk will have some from the farms around Armstrong (really regretting not saying Salmon Arm now) if they are lucky enough to get carried.

My point going back is that Canadian manufacturers big and small are really bad at marketing outside our border.  One of the big reasons being the protectionist wall.  So companies like Arla Foods out of Denmark can make great inroads into our market with basic cheeses (Tre-Stelle brand mostly), but Canadian Manufacturers are not making inroads into other markets.

Pondering

I think we should start with free trade between provinces. 

Misfit Misfit's picture

I have a thread on the dairy industry in Canada and on dairy trade.

Misfit Misfit's picture

This thread is really about dairy food is killing us and eating bugs is the way to go.

There is a thread on the economics of our dairy industry and the trade potentials of imports and exports.

and I didn't start it just to humour myself.

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

Pogo wrote:

Pondering wrote:

I want farmers to be well off. They work harder than bank managers at a job that requires at least as much knowledge and skill, probably far more. They provide an essential service. People making a couple of hundred K a year are not Farmers are workers. 

I think you are thinking of a business model that didn't exist.  Nine families of Aunts and Uncles farmed all over Saskatchewan.  I think I have one cousin now who owns a large farm which was subsidized by a government job (governemnt jobs and the oil rigs kept many farms afloat).  It is now an industry with monstor tractors pulling impliments in a perfect pattern down to the inch (thanks to GPS technology). Volume and low cost operations are the key.  Commodity farmers are no longer workers, they are COO of a corporation.

Yes. We call them "Triple A farmers": April, August and Arizona.

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

Pogo wrote:

I don't know if the hormones we fill our dairy cows with are much different than the hormones Americans fill their dairy cows with.

We have restrictions on the use of bovine growth hormone and antibiotics that are much stricter than the US's.

Misfit Misfit's picture

Timebandit wrote:

Pogo wrote:

Pondering wrote:

I want farmers to be well off. They work harder than bank managers at a job that requires at least as much knowledge and skill, probably far more. They provide an essential service. People making a couple of hundred K a year are not Farmers are workers. 

I think you are thinking of a business model that didn't exist.  Nine families of Aunts and Uncles farmed all over Saskatchewan.  I think I have one cousin now who owns a large farm which was subsidized by a government job (governemnt jobs and the oil rigs kept many farms afloat).  It is now an industry with monstor tractors pulling impliments in a perfect pattern down to the inch (thanks to GPS technology). Volume and low cost operations are the key.  Commodity farmers are no longer workers, they are COO of a corporation.

Yes. We call them "Triple A farmers": April, August and Arizona.

 

That is a very nasty gross overgeneralization, and if only it were true.  Some farmers do do that, yes, but the vast majority do not. Farmers with animals cannot do that. The majority of farmers have animals.

Many farmers without animals have kids in school. Their kids play hockey. They  like curling. They are actively involved in the community.

In our community, one farming couple went south for the winter. That is it.

i am friends in another community with farmers that are huge operators with eight brand new combines running in a field. They have no animals. They all stay in Canada for the winter. They usually fly down to Vegas for a week in January or February. They may take a week or ten day vacation in Mexico or Jamaica as well. And these are very wealthy farmers.

my parents are friends with a very wealthy farming couple. They have two daughters. One is a medical doctor. The other is a dentist. They all went in together and bought a condo in Hawaii. Every February for two weeks, they all plan their vacations for then and go to Hawaii as a family. Their daughters use the condo at other times of the year, but these VERY wealthy farmers go away for two weeks every winter.

Misfit Misfit's picture

Timebandit wrote:

"Yes. We call them "Triple A farmers": April, August and Arizona."

You have to be ignorant of Saskatchewan farming to believe Triple A.

Seeding starts in May.

Harvest wraps up in late September and into mid October. Some farmers cannot get their crops off before winter settles in.

The only crop that can be taken off in August is fall rye.

 

Misfit Misfit's picture

What Saskatchewan grain farmers really do in the winter.

https://southsaskfarmer.com/2014/02/13/do-farmers-actually-work-during-the-winter/

Hopefully this will dispel that urban myth that grain farmers winter in Arizona. 

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

Misfit, I'm from Regina. I lived there for 47 years, my family arrived there in 1883. My partner's family farms around Davidson, has done since the early 20th century. There isn't much you need to tell me about farming on the prairie.

Although it may be dependent on what part of the province you're in, the majority of prairie farmers do not keep livestock anymore. Certainly, none of the farming cousins do. Seeding can take place any time from late April to into May. And I was responding to the comment about "commodity farmers". Essentially, with improvements in chemicals and equipment, the fact that most family farms are now large corporate farms that don't keep animals, the salt-of-the-earth, ultra hard-working farmer is a rare creature these days. And once the kids are mostly grown, there is significant winter time spent in a warmer clime. So if we're going by observation, I'd say mine is as significant as yours is.

I mean, do we really need to "Not all farmers" this?

ETA: And then there's my BIL and his family, who share an organic farm in southwest SK - run as a sort of family co-0p, they are all professional musicians. They come out to farm in the summer, sometimes someone winters over at the farm, but often not. It's not necessary to have someone tend the farm full time over the winter because there's no livestock.

It's also perfectly possible to do the number crunching etc. from Arizona. I hear they have wifi down there.

Misfit Misfit's picture

No TB. Not true. People start seeding on May, So you know of a few farmers, that does not qualify you to assert that your opinions are more valid than mine. 

You are urban. And your mass of farmers wintering in Arizona is a fallacy, an urban myth. You work in the film industry and not at the farm gate.

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

Yes, I work in the film and television industry. However, I have multiple connections to people in farming, as I outlined above. Oddly, my work in television had me spend 18 months profiling a small town that was dealing with a dwindling population due to family farms selling off to larger operations. They were in danger of losing their school and other services because large farms - without livestock, for the most part - means fewer people, and fewer young people. Oddly, many of the farm people I was dealing with weren't available through the whole winter.

That's not even getting into the people that I know personally because I'm related to them.

Find anyone who lives in Regina or Saskatoon and you'll find connection to farming on some level. I don't know what "at the farm gate" means, specifically. But you're never far removed on the prairies. Even in Winnipeg, which is more than 3x the size of either Regina or Saskatoon, most people have family connections still on the farm.

I don't think I claimed there are a "mass" of farmers who are going to Arizona. I said a significant number, and if you did a poll, I think you'd find that once the kids are gone, many farmers spend time away from the cold. Many like Arizona, but some go to Mexico or Florida. And the farmers I personally know who do this will be delighted to discover they don't exist.

RE: seeding. Well, I've seen seeding start earlier. And if not actual seeding, the start of the process, which is preparing fields and equipment in advance, which happens in mid to late April. That's the point my BIL heads out to the farm. If it's dry enough, they'll seed early. If not, they wait. Either way, the process, prep included, starts in April.

I have no idea why you think I'm making this up.

lagatta4

Yes, here too, Armstrong is cheap, mass-produced cheese. I see it more at Pharmaprix (Shopper's drug mart) than at normal supermarkets.

This small Greek chain: http://supermarchepa.com/ often has good cheeses at decent prices, and frequently goat's and ewe's milk dairy products.

Misfit Misfit's picture

The most ignorant people about farming that I have ever met live in Saskatoon and Regina. They are ignorant and have disgraceful stereotypes about farmers.

most farmers cannot afford to go south for the winter. And that is a fact.

and 98% of seeding starts in May. The earliest seeding by a slim minority of farmers starts April 25, 26 weather permitting. In southwest Saskatchewan and south of the Trans Canada like around Estevan you may have farmers start in April (april 25, 26) but seeding starts in May for most farmers. And that is a fact.

knowing people who farm does not qualify as expertise on farming. Never has and never will. I personally know civil engineers but that does not qualify me to talk about civil engineering and the same is true for farming. It is more complex a topic than you think.

JKR

‘No cab, no wheel:’ farm progress showcases autonomous farming; Regina / 980 CJME; Jessika Guse; June 20, 2018;
http://www.cjme.com/2018/06/20/no-cab-no-wheel-farm-progress-showcases-a...

Quote:
“No cab, no steering wheel,” Pattison said. “When we get it to the field, a producer determines a plan to travel in the field (by a digital GPS map) and then it autonomously drives and does whatever function it’s loaded up with. In our case, it would be applying fertilizer or crop spraying.”

Hopefully Hal 9000 from 2001: A Space Odyssey doesn't take over Saskatchewan. "Dave, I'm afraid I can't do that!"

Misfit Misfit's picture

Here is a seeding forecast for central Saskatchewan for this year dated April 25.

http://www.cjwwradio.com/2018/04/26/central-saskatchewan-farmers-hope-to-start-seeding-by-first-weekend-in-may/

in my community in central Saskatchewan, there are three farmers who every year as a tradition start seeding in late April. Most farmers wait until the ground warms up more before they start.

Our family starts a week later than most farmers. My family finds that their crops which are planted later germinate faster and can catch up some to earlier crops because they were planted when the ground is still cold. 

NorthReport
JKR

Maybe farmers in Saskatchewan start seeding in May so they can spend more time in Arizona?
; )

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

Misfit, did you read all of what I put down? Because it looks like you did a skim, picked out a couple of points, ignored any nuance or qualifiers and then started to beat the shit out of that scarecrow.

ETA: ...and that's not even acknowledging the disparaging comments.

NorthReport

Trump says Canada has a totally closed market and that we have a 375% tax on dairy products.

 

https://globalnews.ca/news/4357065/donald-trump-economy-canada-trade/

Misfit Misfit's picture

Bump

quizzical

there seems to be a shortage of cracker barrel cheese here in BC. i guess it must have something to do with the tariffs.

the cheese coolers are full of armstrong only unless you go speciality.

any other provinces notice no cracker barrel? i went shopping in AB and got some and was surprised their sizing and packaging is different than BC too.

NDPP

Get ready to enjoy lots of American Bovine Growth Hormone cancer-milk that will soon be forced into our markets by NAFTA 2.0.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

The good news is, when we've drank enough BGH, we can all be Russian Olympic athletes.  :0

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