Possible NDP leadership thread

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scott16
Possible NDP leadership thread

How much could Nathan Cullen's past leadership bid where he wanted to cooperate with the Libs and Greens hurt him in the next possible leadership?

(If and hopefully when there is a leadership race.)

PS thanks to mark_alfred for the suggestion.

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Debater

Why would that hurt Nathan Cullen?

Many progressive voters want to see the parties at least be open to working with one another in some way.

Geoff

I've seen Peter Julian's name kicked around on various leadership-related posts. What I've read and heard about him suggests he might be the kind of "progressive" alternative who might appeal to those looking for a less centrist leader. Perhaps some babblers from BC who are more familiar with Peter can comment.

Unionist

Here's a biography of [url=http://www.svendrobinson.com/2.html]my nominee[/url].

 

Debater

Svend Robinson was an important part of the old guard of the NDP.

I'm not sure he fits in with today's NDP, though.

And he's been out of politics for a decade.  His comeback attempt against Hedy Fry in Vancouver Centre wasn't successful, and Jack Layton didn't seem that enthused to see him return, either.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Unionist wrote:

Here's a biography of [url=http://www.svendrobinson.com/2.html]my nominee[/url].

 

I have to disagree. If want to go old school then my nominee is.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Bill_Siksay

Stockholm

scott16 wrote:

How much could Nathan Cullen's past leadership bid where he wanted to cooperate with the Libs and Greens hurt him in the next possible leadership?

I don't think it would matter. That was then and this is now. its a moot point the Liberals are the government and whoever leads the NDP is going to have present a plan to oppose the government...of course depending on what kind of electoral reform we end up with - parties may have to start creating pre-election alliance of one kind or another. If we have a preferential voting system would the NDP and Liberals ever agree to to mutual preference deal whereby they each recommend that their voters second preference each other?

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

But of the Lower Mainland MP's the best bet is Peter Julian. He was a community activist and worked for the Council of Canadians prior to his first election win. He is a center left politician who was taught how to be an MP by Libby and Svend.

As a bonus he is functional at ASL. When he talks with his hands it means something.

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Julian

Sean in Ottawa

I have been accused of ageism by saying that the party should not choose a leader who is a senior.

It is not just about ageism or politics. There is a practical divison many poeple feel insinctively yet others seem to miss.

Curiously, many of the people who call for better gender parity and more racial inclusion fail to connect that a part of the reason for this is the need to have this representation at the table -- becuase there are meaningful differences in the output.

I am old enough to remember the term generation gap. It was huge when the boomer generation arrived. They did not think, act, operate, or face the exact same challenges as the previous generation. They had different culture and values. They were very angry that the previous generation had screwed things up and made two wars and they wanted and needed peace. It took some time for this generation to take power but they were not giving it back to the previous generation. This feeling came across party lines.

The same exists at the other end. The generations following the boomers feel the same way. They are not thniking of the second world war -- for their part they are thinking about the waste, debt and mismanagement of the boomer generation that left the next generation indebted in every which way -- including a planet that may be unfit for human life. The boomers inherited a move towards greater equality but ever since that generation took over have done everything possible to centralize wealth and power reversing the social progress of the previous generation within a few short years of taking power (1980s-1990s). The Boomer generation wants to live life to the max for them -- even if it leaves nothing left over -- the next generations to have less pension, power, opportunity, environment.

At some point the next generation is extremely unlikely to accept promises from Boomers on these issues -- the promises have been made many times and broken by that generation. And the Boomers, even as the planet is destroyed should have enough comfort that it won't completely tank during their lifetimes.

Like women and visible minorities, the generations following the boomers have come to understand that the older generation does not see things their way and the only way to have their concerns represented is to have a seat at the table.

Instinctively or not, they demand a generational change in leadership and in policies. Once every so often there is a generational change and parties have to recognize it. If they don't they will pay for that.

This is not to say that there are not some from the previous generation who are exceptions but those exceptions shine like a light and they are rare. The last PM to represent a person who seemed a generation ahead was probably Pierre Trudeau. You will notice no leader before the boomers ever again was successful at the federal level. No matter how great a boomer leader may be, given the policy divides that are very much generational (affecting people based on their age), I do not expect that we will ever see a Boomer leader again become PM.

Geoff

kropotkin1951 wrote:
But of the Lower Mainland MP's the best bet is Peter Julian. He was a community activist and worked for the Council of Canadians prior to his first election win. He is a center left politician who was taught how to be an MP by Libby and Svend. As a bonus he is functional at ASL. When he talks with his hands it means something.
">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Julian

Peter has a very impressive resume, and he is an elected member. I wouldn't want to risk having a leader without a seat.

Given the party's performance in October, I'm not convinced an unelected leader would be successful in winning a seat, regardless of where he or she ran.

scott16

Geoff wrote:

kropotkin1951 wrote:
But of the Lower Mainland MP's the best bet is Peter Julian. He was a community activist and worked for the Council of Canadians prior to his first election win. He is a center left politician who was taught how to be an MP by Libby and Svend. As a bonus he is functional at ASL. When he talks with his hands it means something.
">https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Peter_Julian

Peter has a very impressive resume, and he is an elected member. I wouldn't want to risk having a leader without a seat.

Given the party's performance in October, I'm not convinced an unelected leader would be successful in winning a seat, regardless of where he or she ran.

I agree with you about Peter Julian. However I think it could be advantageous to have a leader outside of the HoC. They could be free to do what Trudeau did in the last Parliament without the attack of not doing their job.