Privatization in Canada

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Privatization in Canada

Edited for brevity

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/manitoba/ronald-wilderman-winnipeg-wrha-te...

It's not clear how long an autistic man was dead in his apartment before his service providers discovered his body — four days after they'd last visited him, client logs show.

Ronald Wilderman, 57, was found dead in his Sherbrook Street apartment on the evening of May 31, 2015, by staff from Teskey & Associates, the firm being paid $312.50 a day to provide 12 hours of support to him.

(312.50*365=114,062.5)

Wilderman was legally in the care of the Public Guardian and Trustee. He was supposed to receive daily supports from Teskey & Associates, an agency hired by the Winnipeg Regional Health Authority to look after him.

A home care co-ordinator wrote to the public trustee in May 2014 — a full year before Wilderman died — saying Teskey staff "struggle with his shortage of funds to meet his basic needs."

Following Wilderman's death, the WRHA conducted an internal review of its contract with Teskey.

The report, completed in June 2016, makes 11 recommendations to improve communication and collaboration between the agency and the health authority, as well as improvements to service delivery and accountability.

Winnipeg Regional Health Authority vice-president Réal Cloutier accepts the report and its recommendations.

Following Wilderman's death, the WRHA conducted an internal review of its contract with Teskey.

 

The report, completed in June 2016, makes 11 recommendations to improve communication and collaboration between the agency and the health authority, as well as improvements to service delivery and accountability.

 

Winnipeg Regional Health Authority vice-president Réal Cloutier accepts the report and its recommendations.

"I think the system did try to do the right thing in providing a supportive environment for him. Obviously, we failed in this circumstance," he said.

"We are learning as a system to work with our partners to do a better job. It's unfortunate to say, but we did learn a lot from this particular incident and his death. I know that doesn't provide solace for the family, but we did. So I hope it does make it better for the next person."

Some changes have already been implemented, such as a new protocol for what happens if a client misses medication, he said.