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Why are boozecans a problem?

RevolutionPlease
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Joined: Oct 15 2007

V


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RevolutionPlease
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RevolutionPlease
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RevolutionPlease
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RevolutionPlease
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RevolutionPlease
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RevolutionPlease
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RevolutionPlease
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RevolutionPlease
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RevolutionPlease
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I'm doing the KenS spam. :)

 

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1wYNFfgrXTI


voice of the damned
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Joined: Sep 23 2004

Well, perhaps there is no problem with boozecans. I currently reside in a country where you can pretty much buy booze anywhere(including convenience stores), around the clock. People here don't seem to mind it, and if it works for them, who am I complain.

But it seems to me that Canadians generally want to have a greater degree of restrictions on when and where you can buy booze. Maybe Canadians are just a bunch of uptight prudes, but as long as that's the way public sentiment is going, then after-hours clubs, which flout the restrictions in a pretty flagrant manner, should probably be shut down.

I think your question is not really "Why do we need to shut down boozecans?", but rather, "Why do we need such severe restrictions on when and where you can buy alcohol?"

 


RevolutionPlease
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Joined: Oct 15 2007

Right votd, but that's fucked up isn't it? Drinking doesn't do shit unless u want to fuck shit up.

 

We are prudes, and a fucked up people. I wish Quebecois would take the lead but that's another thread.

 

I'm all for getting a party going.


lagatta
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Joined: Apr 17 2002

By the way, we are NOT the people in Canada who consume the most average alcohol units, because QuébécoisEs consume very little hard liquor - mostly beer and wine. 

I agree that the type of restrictions one finds in Ontario, for example, are ridiculous. Main restrictions should involve a ban on drink driving and anything else that can harm others. 

Social problems fuelled by booze are another matter, but I don't think opening hours have much to do with those; that is a whole other discussion, and an important one. 


Michelle
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Joined: May 10 2001

I went to The Matador once, probably about a decade ago.  That was fun.  They didn't actually serve booze there - they served pop there, and then there were a couple of people (of course not associated with the club!) who sold mickeys of booze under their coats to the patrons. :)

It was fun.

Seems to me that you can find guns and drugs at most clubs in Toronto, whether after hours or not.  I'm not clear on why there are rules around when clubs have to close, actually.  What is the reasoning behind all clubs having to close at 2 or 3 or whatever time they have to close these days?  Most bars I go to close earlier than the legal closing time anyhow, but then, I don't go to the big barn-like dance bars in the club district, either.


lagatta
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Joined: Apr 17 2002

I couldn't possibly stay up even for Ontario closing time - think it has been extended to 2 am? But ageing boomers are scarcely the key clientele. 


Michelle
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Joined: May 10 2001

Yeah, I can't either.  What a drag it is getting old, as the Stones song goes... :)


lagatta
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Joined: Apr 17 2002

Is your son drinking age yet? 


Michelle
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Joined: May 10 2001

Nope!  A few years still.


Kaitlin McNabb
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Joined: Oct 19 2011

Seems to me the society and booze relationships are kind of doomed to stay where they are. Canadians seem to envy the ways of Europe and the open, public drinking -- especially in parks or beaches in summer. We all try to sneak away with it, and know those special places where you won't get busted.

I'm living in the US currently and the novelty of great beer/wine selections in grocery stores has not worn off, nor has the discount pricing (!), but the strange fascination with booze here seems to be exacerbated by the somewhat ridiculous age restriction. 

I think there is definitely a conversation and point to be made from keeping things so restricted and so illegal for some greatly increases the desire to want and also can pervert the culture around that potentially -- frat culture?


Kaitlin McNabb
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Joined: Oct 19 2011

Also are "boozecans" and "after-hours club" different. I feel like the latter is more ... legitimate (with conforming to laws). Maybe that's from living in Victoria and Vancouver where there is no fun to be had after 10pm and regular bars stay illegally open just so people can do something.


6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010

lagatta wrote:

I agree that the type of restrictions one finds in Ontario, for example, are ridiculous. Main restrictions should involve a ban on drink driving and anything else that can harm others. 

For that matter, in Germany you can drive around with open liquor and pass the bottle around - so long as the driver is sober and not partaking in the rounds.

Another thing is, with all the restrictions on legal drinking, there always has been an active culture of illegal booze-making.

 

 

 

 


lagatta
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Joined: Apr 17 2002

You can't drink in parks, Kaitlin? That is perfectly legal in Montréal. There are some restrictions - it is supposed to be with food, for picnics. That is not very strictly enforced - I don't have to tell you that it is enforced mostly against transients and rowdy yoof. 

Illegal distilling, as well as sale of beer and wine made (legally) for home consumption is also due to the absurdly high prices here. 

Yes, I do think there should be taxes on booze, but such high rates lead to bootlegging. 


Kaitlin McNabb
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Joined: Oct 19 2011

@Lagatta: nah, definitely no park drinking in Van City, or from what I have seen in the states. In Van, there are definitely a select few you know you can just have a few beers and it is low key, but in others they are well policed. Oh Montreal, I long for you and all your food, beers, and brick walls.

I feel like if Canada were to make lesser restrictions, e.g. public drinking in moderation (with picnics, in parks), I'm not sure the majority would do well. Everything would be thrown into excess -- but maybe that is a naive response. I just remember when I was before 19, drinking (now kindly reflected upon as 'loser drinking' or 'teenage drunk') was this weird sport and opportunity to brag and boast. The specific teenage culture of "who was the drunkest" is super dumb and I think is reinforced by making this taboo and "off-limits" culture around booze. 

I guess that whole thought process can slippery-slope into something else though, as there should be age restricitions on consumption, etc.

Just a little moderation I suppose.


lagatta
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Joined: Apr 17 2002

That does exist here too - hell, it even exists in Italy and Spain - but it is very much the exception. Most people enjoying wine or beer with their picnic are simply families or friends. Restrictive cultures can lead to more excess. 

In Italy, where you can drink anywhere, public drunkenness is very much looked down upon as the height of boorishness. 


6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010

In one rural community where I lived I was advised to not drink in the local bar; to do so would make me a drunk.

On the other hand, the first thing that went on the table when you visited someone's home was the bottle of moonshine.

Every community has their own set of rules.

 


RevolutionPlease
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Joined: Oct 15 2007

lagatta wrote:

In Italy, where you can drink anywhere, public drunkenness is very much looked down upon as the height of boorishness. 

 

I thought this was very important. Thanks for the replies after my bender. I'm mostly a boar. heh.  :)


mark_alfred
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Joined: Jan 3 2004

I think the Ontario government is going to introduce wine kiosks in supermarkets run by the LCBO (perhaps selling beer too).  I've seen all sorts of new liquor stores open up in various locations in Toronto.  Seems to be one way the government is attempting to curb the deficit.

Quote:
I agree that the type of restrictions one finds in Ontario, for example, are ridiculous. Main restrictions should involve a ban on drink driving and anything else that can harm others.

To play devil's advocate, the form of the above argument almost sounds like an argument that the gun-lobby makes against gun control.  IE, alcohol doesn't kill people, people acting criminally with alcohol kills people, so "Main restrictions should involve a ban on drink driving and anything else that can harm others", but not restrictions on the sale of alcohol to adults (IE, location or times) and not restirictions on where one can have alcohol.  Replace "alcohol" with "guns" and the argument is almost identical to some arguments the gun lobby makes.


Mr.Tea
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Joined: Jul 9 2011

I don't think it's remotely the same as guns. I don't see any legitimate reason why the average person needs an assault rifle with a 100 round ammo clip. I think that's inherently irresponsible whereas one can (and most do) drink alcohol responsibly. I was just down in the states, spending some time with my wife's family and you can buy alcohol at the 7-11 or at the local supermarket. The best part, however, was all the little independent stores specializing in great beer (I'm a huge craft beer geek). Amazing selection of beers you can't get in Ontario, really knowledgeable staff who can make recommendations.  It makes the LCBO seem so ridiculous in comparison. Even worse is The Beer Store, which is not government-owned but is granted a monopoly on private beer sales by the government. It's owned by the brewers. It was originally Molson, Labatt and Sleeman, which were Canadian but Molson is now owned by Coors (American), Labatt is part of InBev (Brazilian) and Sleeman is part of Sapporo (Japanese). So here you have the government of Ontario granting a monopoly to three foreign corporations at the expense of independent Ontario craft brewers. Terrible policy both from a business standpoint and consumer standpoint.


Bacchus
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Joined: Dec 8 2003

Mr tea, try Premier Foods in Buffalo


Mr.Tea
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Joined: Jul 9 2011

I've been there. It's excellent. Still, I shouldn't have to drive two hours and cross another border just to get a decent beer.


Bacchus
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Joined: Dec 8 2003

I agree but their new location is awesome. Got some of my dogfish head beer with some new ones


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