The Beatles (reprise)

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Unionist
The Beatles (reprise)
Unionist

Papal Bull wrote:
I grew up listening to Sabbath and Ozzy like no tomorrow.

So what did you do when tomorrow inevitably came?

Boom Boom wrote:

The only post-Beatles thing he [Sir Paul] did that ever appealed to me was "Band On The Run" - I listened to it twice then never listened to it ever again. Boring pop pap.

 On the other hand, 40 years later I still never get tired of Lennon's "Imagine" and the Plastic Ono Band album.

Yes!

 

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Someone agrees with me??? That's a first! Laughing

al-Qa'bong

Unionist wrote:

 

So what did you do when tomorrow inevitably came?

 

 

 

Elvis is everywhere!

6079_Smith_W

Unionist, I had no idea you had an inner fluffy arts thread host.

As I was saying to Boom Boom when we were cut off,

Band on the Run is a great album, though my personal favourite is Ram. And though I like Lennon's music ("John Sinclair", "I Don't want to be a Soldier" and #9 Dream are probably my favourites) I still think McCartney has the broader range in terms of style.

(edit)

And of course, Lennon had a hand in Bowie's "Young Americans", which is one of the greatest albums of all time.

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xQHsOJXFpeM

(sorry for the religious content, U)

 

 

Unionist

al-Qa'bong wrote:

Unionist wrote:

 

So what did you do when tomorrow inevitably came?

 

 

Elvis is everywhere!

But that was yesterday - and yesterday's gone.

 

6079_Smith_W

Great song cue, U

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1toYmqDJeg

that would be Beth Orton

... and the Chemical Brothers

Snert Snert's picture

A friend once found, and we both listened to, Unfinished Music No. 2.  In its entirety.

Not the sort of thing one puts on one's iPod.

Polunatic2

Hosted my by-weekly jam last night and, (coincidentally) we ended up doing about 75% Beatle tunes with some Kinks, Stones, Dylan and CCR thrown in for the mix. A lot of Beatle tunes sound pretty simple but many are more complicated than they appear. Lots of chord changes and sometimes tempo changes. And of course lots of room for harmonies. 

Snert Snert's picture

If you're super bored, Yellow Submarine is the original Karaoke track.  One stereo track is just the music, the other is Ringo, a cappella (((shudder))).

Papal Bull

Unionist wrote:

Papal Bull wrote:
I grew up listening to Sabbath and Ozzy like no tomorrow.

So what did you do when tomorrow inevitably came?

 

listen to iron maiden like there was no tomorrow Wink

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I doubt many, if any, baby boomers listen to metal. It'll probably kill us off, finally (the bands made up of baby boomers have played/listened to this stuff so long they're probably innoculated against it).

Papal Bull

I dunno. One of my good friends is in his late 50s and is very much into Motorhead...and the band Death.

Pope Teddywang Pope Teddywang's picture

Two excellent solo McCartney tracks are

No Other Baby - from 'Run Devil Run'

Plastic Beetle  - from 'Liverpool Sound Collage'

Unionist

6079_Smith_W wrote:

Great song cue, U

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=D1toYmqDJeg

that would be Beth Orton

... and the Chemical Brothers

Very interesting - thanks 6.

VanGoghs Ear

Best Album - Rubber Soul

Best Song - Strawberry Fields Forever

Best Quote - (John about Ringo) "Best drummer in the world? He wasn't even the best drummer in The Beatles"

An as far as influential - I think a good case could be made that the whole long hair and beards revolution that started but didn't really go mainstream till the 70's  was started by the beatles in the early 60's.

I mean Smith W - you mentioned Iggy and the Stooges but without the Beatles - there would be no Stooges along with many others

6079_Smith_W

@ VGE

I'm not so sure that if The Beatles had never existed the entire modern music pantheon would have fallen apart. Not do diminish their role, but I don't think they were the only, nor even the most, revolutionary band of their day.

 

 

VanGoghs Ear

well for at least Iggy Pop specifically I know he said that he was obsessed with The Beatles as a teenager, also Kurt Cobain started his love of music with the Beatles for another but I get what yr saying

Pop stars of the day prior to The Beatles rarely if ever wrote their own songs but as far a real greatness goes for artists from the 1960's - 2 words

Roy Orbison - Smith W - from yr list of bands in the previous thread - you strike me as the type who thinks that for something to be revolutionary in music it must be difficult or at least not easily pleasurable to listen to.

Check out the song structures of Roy's songs(especially Crying) and they are not written like most songs -verse chorus verse - they were and are still revolutionary.

 

 

 

Papal Bull

VanGoghs Ear wrote:
for something to be revolutionary in music it must be difficult or at least not easily pleasurable to listen to.

 

 

 

trout mask replica?

Lou Arab Lou Arab's picture

First of all - I think the Beatles deserve their own forum on Babble.

 

Re: Imagine

Ya know, I never really understood all the fuss about this song.  I always thought "All you need is love" was a better peace anthem. In my opinon, 'All you need is love' is Lennon's masterpeice, not imagine. 

Re: McCartney solo work

I always liked the album Venus and Mars the best.  I always liked it better than Band on the Run, and the less said about Paul's Christmas single the better.

6079_Smith_W

Quote:

you strike me as the type who thinks that for something to be revolutionary in music it must be difficult or at least not easily pleasurable to listen to.

Roy Orbison, good.

Although your point about difficult music.... that's relative.

Carmen, The Rites of Spring and Be Bop were very difficult for those who had never heard them before.

And then there's Music for Airports, The Bee Gees' interpretation of Sgt. Pepper, Disco, and Dylan on electric. All revolutionary in their own way, but what kind of revolution?

 

And PB mentioned this fellow:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=J_jZ_DgR8Yk

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xepBfz3mVXs

 

alan smithee alan smithee's picture

Worst Beatle song of all time was 'Bungalo Bill'...product of bad acid,I can't think of another excuse for it.

As for Paul's solo career....Totally forgettable but it may not get worse than Ou est le Soleil (probably one of the worst songs I have ever heard)

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I actually listen to folk music mainly, but occasionally I like to blast out the cobwebs with some funky music or the Stones. I'd start up a folk music thread but I suspect it'd get ignored real fast. Anyone here ever heard of Tim Hardin?  I used to see him perform at Ottawa's Le Hibou coffee house, as well as at least a hundred other folk acts (and blues and rock as well).

Unionist

alan smithee wrote:
Worst Beatle song of all time was 'Bungalo Bill'...product of bad acid,I can't think of another excuse for it.

Well Alan, although I confess it's not one of my favourites, it's very special in a few ways;

- The Beatles were in a TM retreat at the time, and one of the participants went out to shoot a tiger - he was actually in a bungalow, with his mum - thus inspiring the song. Nothing "acid" about it - it was naked realism if anything.

- You can hear Yoko singing in it.

- There's a bassoon part, which lends the song its "lugubrious" quality.

The thing about the Beatles is, everything is special, everything is quirky, everything is memorable.

In my opinion.

 

alan smithee alan smithee's picture

Thanks for giving me the background to the song,Unionist.

I could only take it as it was...Which,without the background story,sounds like something that purple dinosaur (which will remain nameless)would dance around singing.

Pope Teddywang Pope Teddywang's picture

The Rutles - Joe Public

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kzFZSN-BMlY

"I put my faith in the powers that be, Joe Public that's me"

 

King Crimson - Dinosaur

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=pI6OcRvQ49o

"I'm a dinosaur; somebody's digging my bones."

al-Qa'bong

"Shocked.   And stunned."

Quote:

There's a bassoon part, which lends the song its "lugubrious" quality.

 

That bassoon is great...geez, now I have "While My Guitar Gently Weeps" in my head. "Cry Baby Cry" is one of the best songs on that record, and nobody knows about it. Ringo's drumming is good on it as well.  I have that record in white vinyl.  Around 1978 Capitol records release a few Beatles records in coloured vinyl.  The two "Greatest Hits" double LPs were red and blue, "The Beatles" was white (natch) and "Sergeant Pepper" was grey, with what a reviewer for the U of S student newspaper said was "like  ol' Sgt. Pepper barfed on it."

 

 

6079_Smith_W

Hey... I have one of those white vinyl white album too.

Strangely enough I went into McNally's last year and among their new re-releases - no Beatles, but a fresh new pressing of the Bee Gee's  Sgt. Pepper. I actually asked the clerk if they got it in so we could have the pleasure of burning it all over again.

He was not amused.

Odd too, because they had a not bad selection of new vinyl otherwise.

VanGoghs Ear

few things they started or popularized that are still heard today are:

Strings with rock instruments
Telephone sounding vocals
Synths (Mini-Moog, specifically on Abbey Road)
Each person playing multiple instruments
Vocals through Leslie speakers
Automatic Double Tracking of vocals
Tape machine varispeed (esp. Strawberry Fields Forever)
Indian instruments ( yeah, I know Brian Jones was dabbling with sitar when he died, but, well, he died)
Bouncing tracks across multiple machine for more cumulative tracks
8 track recording

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

6079_Smith_W wrote:

Strangely enough I went into McNally's last year and among their new re-releases - no Beatles, but a fresh new pressing of the Bee Gee's  Sgt. Pepper. I actually asked the clerk if they got it in so we could have the pleasure of burning it all over again.

He was not amused.

LaughingLaughingLaughingLaughingLaughing

What was the other piece of crapola that the BG's released? It had a lot of really annoying disco thumping bass.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

6079_Smith_W wrote:

that would be Beth Orton

Have you heard Beth Orton singing Leonard Cohen's Sisters Of Mercy? That's really, really outstanding - I've heard it a dozen times, never tire of it.  Another singer who covers Leonard Cohen incredibly well is Perla Batalla - I have all her albums. Amazing singer, great voice.  Oh - and Rufus Wainwright - he possesses a voice that is absolutely ethereal.

al-Qa'bong

Aerosmith did a not-bad version of "Come Together" on that record, as I recall.  The rest of the record was embarassing, though.

That said, if you put that "music" into the context of what else was going on in commercial radio at the time: the "Grease" soundtrack, Foreigner, "Some Girls" by the Stones, Bob Seeger's "Hollywood Nights," "Hot Child in the City" by Nick Gilder...well, OK, "Sgt. Pepper" was still really lousy.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Cueball wrote:

This conversation made me think twice. So I just had to check and played the greatest live rock recording of the era once more just to be sure, and there is simply no better live rock recording than "The Who Live at Leeds", and anyone who has actually listened to it would in all honesty have to question if the Beatles even qualify as a "band".

Right on!!!!!  I'm on my fourth copy of that album - two on LP, one on cassette, and one on CD. One of the most awesome rock albums ever.   It was also the album of choice for me when I was doing recreational drugs way back when.

Cueball Cueball's picture

This conversation made me think twice. So I just had to check and played the greatest live rock recording of the era once more just to be sure, and there is simply no better live rock recording than "The Who Live at Leeds", and anyone who has actually listened to it would in all honesty have to question if the Beatles even qualify as a "band".

I mean seriously: the Beatles Live in Japan. The Who live at Woodstock.

KenS

I love the Who. But I never did get the attraction of live albums, period.

Unionist

I think I've heard of The Who. They were from Winnipeg, right?

 

 

 

 

 

*runs for cover*

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

Unionist wrote:

I think I've heard of The Who. They were from Winnipeg, right?

I've never flagged you before, but this might be the first time. Laughing

KenS

Covered who?

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

KenS wrote:

I love the Who. But I never did get the attraction of live albums, period.

You're kidding, right? Frown

al-Qa'bong

Quote:

This conversation made me think twice. So I just had to check and played the greatest live rock recording of the era once more just to be sure, and there is simply no better live rock recording than "The Who Live at Leeds", and anyone who has actually listened to it would in all honesty have to question if the Beatles even qualify as a "band".

The key word here is "rock." Except for maybe "Back in the USSR" and "Revolution," the Beatles were merely "toppermost of the poppermost," not a rock and roll outfit. Geez, there's more rock in the first five notes of "You Really Got Me" than in the whole Beatles' oeuvre.

 

I like The Who OK, but there always seemed to me something missing at their core, something soulful that just wasn't there. "Magic Bus" on "Live at Leeds" is brilliant, mind you.

KenS

Not at all.

There are lots of us.

For the longest time i thought the only reason they were around was to issue another record, on the cheap.

It was a surprise to learn that people liked them, and weren't just buying them because they bought everything by their favourite bands.

al-Qa'bong

Unionist wrote:

I think I've heard of The Who. They were from Winnipeg, right?

 

 

 

 

 

*runs for cover*

 

The Weakerthans is gonna get you, sucka.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I play my live albums in my house on LOUD - through a 250w/ch stereo - just like being at a concert almost. Some studio albums strike me as sterile, lacking soul.

KenS

I go to concerts to be there.

When I hear live albums, I hear a lot of noise. And an attempt to make me feel like I'm there.

al-Qa'bong

Some folks like live records so much that they fake them.  I'm looking at you, Elton"Benny and the Jets"  John.

I like live albums: "Get Your Ya Yas Out ("paint it black, you devil"), "Double Live Gonzo," "The Song Remains the Same" (I used to have a chronic need to listen to this every day), "Muddy Waters Live," "Bob Marley...Live" (a bit better than "Babylon by Bus"), "Toots and the Maytals" ("When we say, dey don't say"), "Pissed and Proud" by Peter and the Test Tube Babies("Intensive What?"), and Benny Goodman's 1938 Carnegie Hall Concert (man oh man, you have to listen to Jess Stacy's killer piano solo at the end of "Sing Sing Sing"), to name a few.

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I would add the live albums by Crowbar, King Biscuit Boy, Ronnie Hawkins, Dylan, and The Band. Awesome stuff!

 

(and there's thousands more live albums out there)

6079_Smith_W

Here is some great live Elton John:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0c3z7o_dh9Q

And agreed about "Live at Leeds". And I should add that John Entwistle should be on that list of great guitarists. Hard to say which period of theirs I like best, but Sell Out, Who's Next and Quadrophenia are probably my faves.

I think some bands are good live, and some are better in the studio. When it is good it definitely brings out something different than studio recordings.

 

 

Cueball Cueball's picture

al-Qa'bong wrote:

Quote:

This conversation made me think twice. So I just had to check and played the greatest live rock recording of the era once more just to be sure, and there is simply no better live rock recording than "The Who Live at Leeds", and anyone who has actually listened to it would in all honesty have to question if the Beatles even qualify as a "band".

The key word here is "rock." Except for maybe "Back in the USSR" and "Revolution," the Beatles were merely "toppermost of the poppermost," not a rock and roll outfit. Geez, there's more rock in the first five notes of "You Really Got Me" than in the whole Beatles' oeuvre.

 

I like The Who OK, but there always seemed to me something missing at their core, something soulful that just wasn't there. "Magic Bus" on "Live at Leeds" is brilliant, mind you.

The point I am making is that the Who can play their material live, whereas the Beatles can not. Indeed, watching the few live cuts that exist from the Beatles there is that distinct punk rock experience of wondering if the band is going to make it all the way to the chorus. On the other hand, with a band like the who, you are wondering if the band is going to fly.

6079_Smith_W

Actually it would have been physically impossible for the Beatles to do so with their later material - I remember an interview with George in which he said exactly that. So you pose a good question - what's a band?

By the same token, was Steely Dan a band? I think so, but in a very different form than a band that plays out.

And my favourite live album - Tonights the Night by Neil Young, even though it was technically made in the studio, the fact that it was a wake made it live.

Though to get back to The Beatles, here is Exhibit A:

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=yXv77d0SwJU

Boom Boom Boom Boom's picture

I'm listening to All Things Must Pass on headphones. After Imagine and Plastic Ono Band, it's my favourite album by the quartet. Awesome album.

Ripple

Boom Boom, you mentioned how you enjoyed One when it was released.  I did too, but more so love The Beatles Anthology. Wonder what others think of it?

Cueball, you are dead to me ("charming and vacuous," indeed) but Live at Leeds is fantastic.

 

I'm listening to Blood on the Tracks right now.

 

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