La problematique; the whole mess

21 posts / 0 new
Last post
Doug Woodard
La problematique; the whole mess

*****

Regions: 
Doug Woodard

Monbiot: There may be flowing water on Mars. But is there intelligent life on Earth?

http://gu.com/p/4czfy/sbl

 

Unionist

Problématique is feminine.

Doug Woodard

Unionist wrote:
Problématique is feminine.

Sorry about that, it was careless of me. Perhaps the mods could correct the title.

 

Unionist

Well, they corrected the definite article, but the é is still absent. Half a loaf can assuage even a hearty appetite, though.

Now back to the topic at hand.

What's wrong with smartphones for dogs?

 

Doug Woodard

The Limits to Growth -

 

Its demonization:

http://www.theoildrum.com/node/3551

 

A recent assessment - it was right:

http://gu.com/p/4x6zv/sbl

 

Doug Woodard

Videos: Bill Rees on the human future:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3F9cDA-R4J8

8 videos of 7+ minutes each. He doesn't hold much back except for the upbeat ending.

Doug Woodard

Jean-Marc Jancovici on energy and the economy. Video in French, with English text. Style very French:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Fb_GNIa2joE

Prices will respond to the periodic fluctuations of supply and demand, as we see now, when several countries including China are in economic difficulties just when a cycle of investment has enhanced extraction facilities.

More could be said on mineral resources, for example this article by Douglas Reynolds:

http://www.hubbertpeak.com/reynolds/mineraleconomy.htm

The website contains much other valuable material:

http://www.hubbertpeak.com

Several recent books by Kenneth Deffeyes, for example "Hubbert's Peak" are useful, see

http://www.bookfinder.com

A review article from a few years back is still pertinent; thanks to Bill Hulet for keeping it up:

http://www.uoguelph.ca/~whulet/OGN/Vol1Issue1/Doug_Woodard.htm

 

Doug Woodard

A Geomoment of Affluence Between Two Austere Eras:

http://npg.org/wp-content/uploads/2015/07/2015-Geomoment-Forum-Paperrev0...

 

iyraste1313

Thanks for this! But there are so many commonly held assumptions here I must challenge, which are tied to the fundamental flaws of the perspective of the Greens movement...I only wish I have the time to do this justice, sometime.....but I question the idea that it is exhaustion of the resource that determines...rather it is  the collapsing economomics and finances, a capitalist system that is bankrupting the capacity of people to exhaust the resource!

One only need look at the collapsing Dry Baltic Trade Indext to understand this!

So the Greens focus on the fossil fuels..carbon taxes ad nauseum...when they should be looking more holistically at the nature and culture of Society, its centralization, globalization, finacialization!

So what is desperately needed is a transformation of the Green movement to something more holistic.......desperately needed!!

Doug Woodard

The world got cannier at using energy last year:

http://www.reuters.com/article/us-iea-energy-efficiency-idUSKCN12A0OM

 

 

Doug Woodard

The rising cost of resources and global indicators of change:

http://www.americanscientist.org/issues/feature/2015/6/the-rising-cost-o...

 

Doug Woodard
iyraste1313

The solutions: education, poverty reduction, reproductive health??

...what´s missing in this analysis is the fact that some people consume hundreds of thousands more resources than others......dependent on capital intensive shelters, processed foods, transport of goods, use of transport, need for transport etc.

...what´s missing is that some societies rely on highly concentrated centralized systems of production, distribution and control...to leave all this out is outrageous!

Doug Woodard

iyraste1313 wrote:

The solutions: education, poverty reduction, reproductive health??

...what´s missing in this analysis is the fact that some people consume hundreds of thousands more resources than others......dependent on capital intensive shelters, processed foods, transport of goods, use of transport, need for transport etc.

...what´s missing is that some societies rely on highly concentrated centralized systems of production, distribution and control...to leave all this out is outrageous!

iyraste, you might remember that people don't vary nearly as much in the amount of food they eat as in other forms of consumption. Food translates into land. And we need the rest of the community of life on earth for our survival, among other things. It depends on land.

Further, while an equitable division of resources would be nice, survival has a higher priority.

Doug Woodard

Peak Civilization: The Fall of the Roman Empire, and analogies:

http://europe.theoildrum.com/node/5528

 

Doug Woodard

Are Humans Unsustainable by Nature? by William E. Rees:

http://www.plancanada.com/Unsustainable%20by%20Nature.rees.pdf

 

Doug Woodard

The 100 percent renewable energy future: the good news and the bad news:

http://www.resilience.org/stories/2017-01-01/the-100-percent-renewable-e...

 

Doug Woodard

The Responsibility of Intellectuals in a Climate-Changed, Crisis-Ridden World, by Bill Barnes;

a review of Erik Wright's "Envisioning Real Utopias":

http://crookedtimber.org/wp-content/uploads/2013/03/CrookedTimberRealUto...

 

Doug Woodard

Overcoming societal addictions: What can we learn from individual therapies?

by Robert Costanza and others

https://www.researchgate.net/publication/308958235_Overcoming_societal_a...

 

Doug Woodard

The Human Ecological Predicament: Wages of Self-Delusion:

https://mahb.stanford.edu/blog/human-eco-predicament/

By implication, Rees rejects:

1. Classical capitalism, with its appetite for endless growth and its rejection of collective control.

2. Classical socialism (especially its "Marxist" form) with its espousal of abundance through industry, its rejection of limits to human numbers and activity, and its view of nature as merely raw material for an independant human enterprise. 

Can there be a socialism which accepts limits? What would it entail?