No More Climate Change

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epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..this is what capitalism looks like. and it is not human nature but political and economic structures that are governed by the rich and powerful.

Today we’ve consumed more resources than the planet can renew in a year

Today is Earth Overshoot Day, the date when we have taken more from nature than it can renew in an entire year. Unsustainable extraction is occurring on a planetary scale: we are using natural resources 1.7 times faster in 2018 than the Earth’s ecosystems can regenerate this year. Critically, this year is the earliest date that we have gone into ecological deficit, the only deficit that truly matters.

Earth Overshoot Day is a clear and growing signal that our economies are, in the words of the Global Footprint Network, operating a giant planetary Ponzi scheme: borrowing far more from the Earth’s ecosystems than they can sustain. But we are already having to pay the price. From deadly heat waves to mass extinctions, soil erosion to dwindling water supplies, we are entering a new era of accelerating environmental collapse.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Alliant plans to eliminate coal, cut emissions 80% by 2050

Dive Brief:

  • Alliant Energy on Thursday issued its Corporate Sustainability Report, revealing a plan to eliminate coal use and cut emissions 80% by 2050. 
  • The company will spend more than $2 billion on new renewable energy, and will double its number of wind sites from six to a dozen. Renewables will make up more than 30% of its energy mix by 2030.
  • The utility said the plan will set a more aggressive course than what the United States originally pledged in the United Nations Paris climate accord, which called for reducing carbon 32% percent below 2005 levels by 2030. The utility's plan targets a 40% reduction by 2030.

Dive Insight:

Alliant joins a handful of utilities announcing plans to eliminate coal use and increase investment in renewables. In June, Consumers Energy announced it would file a long-term plan that calls for nixing coal use by 2040 and more than tripling renewable energy utilization over the course of the next 10 years. In January, PPL Corp. said it expects most of its Kentucky coal fleet to be retired by 2050 and Duke Energy has included coal-less scenarios in its long-term planning.

New construction and purchase agreements will allow Alliant to grow its wind portfolio to more than 2,700 MW by 2021. Earlier this year Alliant received approval for 500 MW of wind in Iowa, which means about a third of its capacity in that state will be wind power by 2020.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

quizzical

i hear publuc servants in ON can no longer speak about climate change. i guess Doug's moratorium must mean teachers too?

it's frightening me to realize ON determines national elections more often than not.

gotta say Rafe might be right.

capitalizing or the ability to i think is part of inherent biology of all things.

capitalism is not. i think it's a sliding scale starting at the physical manifestion of capitalizing. passing the point of capitalizing homeostasis means capitalism is a pathology.

hoarding is a mental illness on the diagnostic scale. hoarding money, or capitalism, needs to be viewed for what is, a mental illness.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

quizzical

..capitalism is financial and political structures. hoarding is a byproduct of these structures..imho.

..trailer

The Lucas Plan: a Documentary

The Plan That Came From The Bottom Up

40 years ago a group of skilled engineers at Lucas Aerospace UK, when threatened with redundancy, responded with an ambitious plan to make better use of their talents – designing what they called socially useful and environmentally sustainable alternatives to the military products their company made.

THE PLAN asks why we’re not more aware of their remarkable story, which flew in the face of recession and the free market philosophy rising up at that time. It shows how the Lucas workers developed their plan – including wind turbines, a hybrid car, heat pumps and energy efficient housing – and reveals its broader social, environmental and political implications.

It’s a story that fills the void of 40 years lost to the idea of society being subordinate to so-called free markets. A story in need of knowing and celebrating, that still offers much to our time.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Capitalism Killed Our Climate Momentum, Not 'Human Nature'  -   by Naomi Klein

Is capitalism still responsible for our inaction?  Or people's unwillingness to go vegan, drink tapwater, walk instead of driving, choose to live where they can walk instead of driving, stop heating their giant swimming pool, vacation locally, set their thermostat to 18 and wear a sweater, or turn the A/C off in their car and open a window?

The heart wants what the heart wants.  And sometimes that's to go to Cancun if there's cheap tickets online.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..when it comes to the planet and our crisis the heart doesn't make the decisions. power does.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Perhaps we just disagree.  I don't believe that "power" forces people to drive 6km to the PriceCo. to stock up on cases of bottled water.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..i posted a piece that spoke of 100 corporation producing 71% of the carbon. that leaves the rest of us producing 29%. yet you, and others i might add, choose to focus on the 29%. why?

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
i posted a piece that spoke of 100 corporation producing 71% of the carbon. that leaves the rest of us producing 29%. yet you, and others i might add, choose to focus on the 29%. why?

I just tried to find it, by searching for "71" in this thread but couldn't.  If you can post a link, I'll take a look.

But just provisionally, those 100 corporations producing 71% of the carbon... are they selling it to anyone? 

I certainly don't produce much carbon -- it's not like I'm out in my backyard burning coal -- but are we buying it?  And are there alternatives?

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..there always has been alternatives. look at post #56 for example.

These 100 Companies Are Responsible for Most of the World’s Carbon Emissions

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

UN Scientific Paper Suggests Capitalism Has to Die in Order for the Planet to Be Saved

Capitalism and global sustainability are incongruous with one another, according to a recent paper for the UN’s 2019 Global Sustainable Development Report.

The team of researchers from various academic institutions throughout Finland who wrote the report gave a sobering assessment of the planet’s future if the current economic order continues unabated. Namely, that all rich Western countries have based their societies on an abundance of cheap energy, which the scientists say is no longer a reality.

“Economies have used up the capacity of planetary ecosystems to handle the waste generated by energy and material use,” the paper reads. “[D]ominant economic theories as well as policy-related economic modeling rely on the presupposition of continued energetic and material growth. The theories and models anticipate only incremental changes in the existing economic order. Hence, they are inadequate for explaining the current turmoil.”

Scientists argued that worsening climate change is having a drastic impact on ecosystems and biodiversity, and that symptoms of unchecked capitalism like rising inequality, unemployment, and debt are also contributing to the destabilization of society. In order to guarantee that humanity is able to have a good quality of life on earth for future generations, the paper’s authors argued that new economic systems will have to be created, rather than the standard band-aid approach governments have taken in the recent past.

“Central banks in the US and the Eurozone have resorted to unconventional measures such as negative interest rates and buying up significant amounts of public debt,” researchers wrote. “This has relieved some economic pressure, but … It can be safely said that no widely applicable economic models have been developed specifically for the upcoming era.”

While the paper didn’t endorse any specific economic system to be used in lieu of capitalism, scientists said it would necessary to “transform the ways in which energy, transport, food, and housing are produced and consumed” with the goal of attaining “production and consumption that provides decent opportunities for a good life while dramatically reducing the burden on natural ecosystems.”

WWWTT

epaulo13 wrote:

Wrong answer! The problem is materialism

WWWTT

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Is capitalism still responsible for our inaction?  Or people's unwillingness to go vegan, drink tapwater, walk instead of driving, choose to live where they can walk instead of driving, stop heating their giant swimming pool, vacation locally, set their thermostat to 18 and wear a sweater, or turn the A/C off in their car and open a window?

The heart wants what the heart wants.  And sometimes that's to go to Cancun if there's cheap tickets online.

Problem is materialism. However this is a weapon currently used by corporations strictly to satisfy an never ending gluttonous appetite for profits!

People are brainwashed. They will do whatever the corporations tell them to do. Corporations using materialism are the problem. If people just stopped being materialistic, the corporations would only increase their brainwashing efforts by 10X! Government must intervene or we're doomed for sure!

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Under capitalism rich people get to pool their assets to exploit resources without taking all the risks. That is the heart of our system and it is the problem killing our planet. If our fucking billionaires lost all their money and assets when they polluted their neighbours environment we would have no problem. However they get to hide behind a corporate veil that means the only assets up for grabs when they pillage the commons are peanuts in a shell company.

Our society is in the clutches of the Cult of the Invisible Hand and its high priests are the MBA's who believe in shareholder value above all else. All societies need to amass capital so it is all about who gets to control the use of that capital. Is is society's capital or not? Which side are you on has always been the question?

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Problem is materialism. However this is a weapon currently used by corporations strictly to satisfy an never ending gluttonous appetite for profits!

This is at least the third post of yours blaming the world's problems on materialism, so I'll assume you had some kind of epiphany, and this is the rock on which you make your stand.

Anyway, in the context of environmentalism, I think it's more a case of convenience that drives people.  Nobody lives on Mama Michelina's 99 cent frozen entrees, or drives a mile that they could walk, or uses a "pod" coffee maker because of materialism. 

And to anyone else:  I'm not suggesting that the fix has to come from us all making meaningless little choices to wash and rinse our drinking straws, while corporations do nothing different.

But I do feel like, at a certain point, if people really are as worried about the environment as they tell pollsters they are, they could perhaps drink tap water just the one time?  Try giving some to their pet and see if it dies, maybe?  But I see so much ridiculous and needless waste happening that it's hard for me to believe that the environment is the "big issue" of our time.

And just as we can't fix it all ourselves by re-using drinking straws, neither can "the elites" fix it for us while we keep buying billions of plastic bottles filled with "non-cootie" water.

WWWTT

Ohhh I really stuck a thorn in you hey Mr Magoo? What the matter, a little too attached to your possessions and lifestyle? Well at least you can keep blaming someone else or belittle the evils of materialism. You can also stick your fingers in your ears and yell out "I can't hear you!"

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Ohhh I really stuck a thorn in you hey Mr Magoo?

No.  I think I've made it clear that you've totally got the wrong end of the stick here.

Quote:
What the matter, a little too attached to your possessions and lifestyle?

Aside from the little row house my wife and I live in, my single most valuable possession is a camera (I'm a photographer) which would probably sell for about a thousand dollars.  No car.  No boat.  No cottage.  No diamonds.  No gold.

I honestly can't recall the last time I bought any clothing other than socks and underwear new.  My TV isn't even HD, which isn't that important since I haven't watched it in about four years.  My wife rides a bicycle that a friend gave us... is that the possession that you think I'm obsessed with (or, is my wife riding a bike to work the lifestyle that you think I'm obsessed with?)

Anyway, carry on.  Tell me more about me.

 

WWWTT

Hmmm, I thought you were a teacher, had kids that played hockey and drove an suv? Perhaps your writing style that you use gave me this impression? Either way, I made my point.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
Perhaps your writing style that you use gave me this impression?

Hehe.  Ya, sometimes I indulge my "teacher with hockey kids and an SUV" writing style for emphasis.

Quote:
Either way, I made my point.

Unless it had something to do with your vast imagination, no, sorry.  You didn't.

WWWTT

Ya actually I did. If you didn’t get it or just simply disagree doesn’t really impact my goal of expressing my view. Thanks for participating!

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

California Is Close to Passing a Bill That Would Require 100% Clean Energy by 2045

California is on a path to 100% clean energy.

A bill, which would require California to transition to a fully renewable energy grid devoid of fossil fuels by 2045, passed the state Assembly on Tuesday, bringing it one step closer to becoming a reality.

The bill has been under debate for nearly two years and has faced objections from utilities and oil companies and some Assembly members. But on Tuesday, the Assembly voted 43-32 in favor of the bill, which had been introduced by Sen. Kevin de León. Senate Bill 100 will now return to the state Senate, where it is expected to pass. It will then be sent to Gov. Jerry Brown for his signature.

Should the bill pass, California will be only the second state after Hawaii to pass a plan to rely solely on clean energy by 2045. But SB100’s ambitions don’t end there. The bill also ups the state’s clean energy goals, requiring that utilities providers generate 60% of their power from renewable sources by 2030. That goal had previously been set at 50% by 2030....

 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
A bill, which would require California to transition to a fully renewable energy grid devoid of fossil fuels by 2045, passed the state Assembly on Tuesday, bringing it one step closer to becoming a reality.

I'm honest-to-Gord not just heckling here, but I can't deny I'm far more interested in the last step toward this than the first step.

Lots of folk take "the first step" toward health by declaring, on New Year's Eve, that 2019 will be their year of no more crap food, no more processed shit, no more cheap booze, no more sitting on the couch, no more avoiding the gym...

But let's be honest here.  They just wrote a cheque for their children to cash.  The day of reckoning is 27 years -- a full generation -- in the future.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..i'm surprised it got this far. and it's expected to pass the senate so we'll see. eta: it's not that the only benefit comes right at the end. the process itself can bring change.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

September 8, 2018 — Join a Global Day of Action

Real climate leader­ship rises from the grass­roots up.

Local action is leading the way — Be part of the movement that’s ending the era of fossil fuels and building 100% renewable energy for all.

Find an event near you:

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
..i'm surprised it got this far. and it's expected to pass the senate so we'll see. eta: it's not that the only benefit comes right at the end. the process itself can bring change.

Well, fair enough.  And it does kind of look like California is trying to get ahead of the curve.  I guess when I picture L.A. I just still picture lanes and lanes worth of cars on the freeway, and it's hard to imagine them giving that up until sometime late in 2044.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..i pictured chinatown and the water wars.

eta:

..more on california

Look beyond tech in the lead up to SF climate summit

When the world streams into California for Jerry Brown’s climate summit in September, they’ll focus on the things that the state considers it has done right: the electric cars, the massive solar installations in the desert, the big shiny batteries that hold some of the keys to the planet’s energy future.

But there’s another story to be told about California, a reminder that the world is always a more complicated place once you look behind the p.r. photos. Reporters and environmentalists should plan on coming out a few days before the September 12 summit; if they do they’ll have a better understanding of the real challenges and opportunities.

September 8, for instance, will feature a massive march in San Francisco, part of a worldwide Rise for Climate action protest. It won’t be a celebration—it will be a demand for faster and fairer action, action that reaches every kind of person.

Think about the neighborhoods community organizations like PODER serves, places like the Mission and Excelsior districts. These are filled with Latinx immigrants, many of whom have left their homes because of the droughts, the floods, the sheer impossible heat now spreading across the world. And now these neighborhoods are increasingly the epicenters of gentrification and displacement. Their main connections with the booming cleantech economy are the ever-higher rents, and the stench of the diesel buses driving programmers out to their Silicon Valley jobs. They need urban farms and greenspaces, they need affordable housing centered on transit lines. They need the city to finally divest from fossil fuels and instead invest in a municipal bank that helps these modest dreams become reality.

Poor people in other parts of California have it at least as bad. Jerry Brown has so far refused to stop granting new permits for oil and gas wells in the state—a sold-out stance completely at odds with his reputation as a green hero. In California that means lots of people live or go to school right next to derricks and frack sites—not rich people, of course, but people who have no choice. 92 percent of the people living near oil and gas wells are people of color.

They’re in south-central LA and rural Kern County, near the refineries of Richmond or the oil ports in Long Beach.

That’s why eight hundred groups have come together to ask Brown to address this short-sightedness: to stop issuing new permits and to start the controlled phase-out of fossil fuels. His summit will be all about energy demand; it needs to be about supply as well, and he needs to show the courage to stand up to the fossil fuel industry that has too long ruled this state....

 

ReeferMadness

progressive17 wrote:

If Greenland melts, the sea goes up 7 metres all over the world. Victoria, BC is gone.

No.  Just No.  I live in Victoria and it would not be "gone".  The vast majority of it is 15 metres or more above sea level.  We'd lose some very expensive real estate and the municipality of Oak Bay might become an island but  Victoria isn't one of the cities most at risk.  Greater Vancouver, OTOH, is likely to be in for a world of pain even in much less severe circumstances.  Richmond, Delta, parts of Surrey and other areas are all vulnerable even at much lower levels of sea level rise.  At 7 metres, Richmond would be mostly "gone".

In the world, areas at risk include the US eastern seaboard, parts of California (including, oddly, Sacramento), the low countries in Europe, parts of China, south Asia and areas around the 'stans' on the Caspian Sea.  If anyone is interested, here is a simulator that shows effects of sea level rise.

Quote:

So is Florida

South Florida is in a unique situation.  Not only is it very close to sea level, it's built on porous limestone.  If they were to build sea walls or dikes, the water will just seep up through the ground.  It already happens during king tides.  Their drinking water is at serious risk.  I wouldn't take South Florida real estate if you gave it to me.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Indigenous Women Rise Against Jerry Brown’s Climate Half-Measures

Ahead of the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco, organizers prepare to advocate more radical solutions.

quote:

“Nobody inside the summit wants to talk about leaving fossil fuels in the ground or reducing our energy consumption,” says Kandi Mossett, the Native energy and climate campaign organizer for the Indigenous Environmental Network, a member group of the It Takes Roots Alliance. “It’s ‘how can we continue to make money while basically pacifying groups [by saying] that we’re working on the climate crisis’—and that’s through emissions trading schemes.”

The goal of Sol2Sol is to expose what they see as false solutions offered by supposed climate leaders such as Brown and to bring together a community of radical organizers to brainstorm ways to combat climate change and leave fossil fuels in the ground.

“We have to be at the table,” says Mossett. “Leaders are going to be making decisions that completely impact our future and impact us now, but we’re not allowed in.” Very few organizers from the alliance have been given access to the summit, she says.

For Mossett, the climate crisis is deeply personal and directly connected to her identity as an indigenous woman. She spent her childhood on the Fort Berthold Reservation in North Dakota, where she grew up thinking it was normal for everyone you know to have cancer. Her home was surrounded by nine coal powered plants as well as uranium mining.

Decisions being made behind closed doors at Brown’s summit will have serious stakes for indigenous communities throughout the country, says Isabella Zizi, 24. Zizi works with Idle No More SF Bay, a grassroots organization formed out of an indigenous grandmothers’ prayer group in Canada that has established a network of chapters throughout California. Idle No More SF Bay is a member group of the It Takes Roots Alliance.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Montreal wants to be carbon neutral by 2050

Montreal Mayor Valérie Plante wants her city to be carbon neutral by 2050.

Plante made the pledge on the first day of the Global Climate Action Summit in San Francisco, where Jean-Francois Parenteau, the city councillor responsible for the environment, is representing Montreal.

As part of its climate change efforts, the City of Montreal wants to “decarbonize” all municipal buildings by 2030, a measure that would be extended to all buildings by 2050. This means buildings must operate at a net-zero carbon standard.

Buildings are responsible for 12 per cent of emissions nationwide, or 17 per cent of emissions, if including indirect pollution associated with electricity. The federal government has set aside $182 million as part of its climate change policies to encourage cities to adopt net-zero building codes by 2030.

Vancouver has also pledged to eliminate emissions from new buildings by 2030. Toronto has also made a similar pledge, alongside more than a dozen mayors from around the world who represent 130 million urban citizens....

NDPP

Open Letter From the Indigenous Peoples of the World

https://www.ienearth.org/open-letter-from-the-indigenous-peoples-of-the-...

"Original peoples and Indigenous nations of the world gathered on the Ramaytush and the greater Ohlone territory in California supported by ILO Convention 169 on Indigenous and Tribal Peoples (1989) and the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples (2007) to protest the Global Climate Action Summit (GCAS) hosted by Governor Jerry Brown and the Governors' Climate and Forests Task Force (GCF).

The GCAS and GCF must not place a market value on the Carbon Sequestration capacity of our forests in the Global South and North..."

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

NDPP

Climate of Class Rule: Common(s)er Revolt or Common Ruin

https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/09/07/climate-of-class-rule-commonser-...

"Those who want to avert a new Black Death on a planetary scale need to confront the imperial world system that emerged in feudalism's aftermath - capitalism as such.

We cannot affaord denial and evasion about eco-exterminist systems of class rule any more than we can afford denial and evasion of human beings' impact (under the command of capital) on life systems.

It is important I think, to note that the climate crisis hits disadvantaged populations first and rich and powerful last.

It's 'the rich', not humanity in general, that 'are destroying the Earth.' At the same time however, it is in fact up to 'our species' yes humanity, to save itself and other Earthly life forms by engaging in a great mass uprising against those who have plundered and poisoned the commons for private profit."

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Bill McKibben to Jerry Brown: We Must Keep the Oil in the Soil, Limiting Emissions Is Not Enough

quote:

BILL MCKIBBEN: Some of them using that banner. And so they are assembling now representatives of state and local governments to say, “Here are the steps we’re going to take.” And that’s a very good thing to be doing. We do need to try and reassemble the momentum we had after Paris. But remember that the goal here is not to be Paris-compliant. The goal here is to deal with the physics and chemistry of climate change. And one big part of doing that is stopping the supply of these fossil fuels, at least not expanding their operation. So all anybody asked was that he stop granting new permits and start taking out those wells that are right next to people’s houses. So far, no real response on that.

The other of course thing to realize, and that people are working on hard here at the summit, is around the question of money supply. Money is the oxygen on which the fire that is global warming burns, and we’re working hard to try and staunch that supply. The good news, the best news I’ve heard all week, is that the new totals for the fossil fuel divestment campaign reached $6 trillion in endowments and portfolios.

AMY GOODMAN: Wait, now explain this again, when you think about divestment.

BILL MCKIBBEN: We have asked, for the last five years, for institutions to sell their holdings in coal and oil and gas. This was modeled on the divestment campaign after the—in the midst of South African apartheid. But it is now much larger than that campaign, because as of August, entire countries, Ireland in this case, were announcing that they were divesting from fossil fuel. New York City, London—their mayors put out a challenge on Monday to mayors of all of the other big cities in the world. They said, “We are divesting from fossil fuel. Time for everyone to take this step.”

AMY GOODMAN: What about here in San Francisco?

BILL MCKIBBEN: San Francisco has not done it yet, surprisingly. California, as I say, remains in the grip, often, of coal and oil and gas interests, but one assumes that San Francisco will eventually take this step. The problem is the “eventually.” We don’t have a hell of a lot of time left to deal with the crisis that we’re in. You were showing those pictures from Greenland a minute ago. I was up there helping them film, and I’ve got to say it is sobering, even for someone who has worked as long on this as I have, to stand there and almost literally in real time watch those glaciers disappear into the sea. It is a reminder that doing anything less than all we can do is not OK at this point. So that means we need Governor Brown to step up, and if he won’t do it, we need Governor Newsom after him to step up, and the same all over the world.

I will say that another piece of good news came late last week when the senator from Oregon, Mr. Merkley, introduced a bill in the Senate that would divest the federal government’s pension funds from fossil fuel. It obviously is not going to pass right away, but it is a marker now laid down in this fight.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..6 min video

Hundreds Disrupt Global Climate Action Summit, Demand Climate Justice

Civic and business leaders convened at California Governor Jerry Brown’s Global Climate Action Summit, but protestors decried their “false solutions” to the climate crisis

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..today's democracy now show is from san fran and provides excellent coverage of what is going on.

“Climate Capitalism Is Killing Our Communities”: Protesters Disrupt Gov. Brown’s SF Climate Summit

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

$2.3-Billion Production Facility in Quebec to Deliver Durable, All-Glass Solar Panels

Solargise Canada is negotiating a land purchase in Salaberry-de-Valleyfield, about 65 kilometres (40 miles) southwest of Montreal, for the first phase of a C$2.3-billion project to build a new generation of plastic-free solar collectors.

The subsidiary of UK-based Solargise Ltd. chose the site for its Sand to Power project based on its close proximity to a rail line, a utility substation, and the Port of Valleyfield....

Aristotleded24

Environmentalist mistake number 4: Doomsday messaging (emphasis mine):

Quote:

Did it shock you to see the lake at the North Pole? I was certainly shocked, but at the same time I felt powerless to do anything about it. I thought, “If the North Pole is melting, then there’s no hope of ever keeping climate change under control!” And if that really is the case, I can’t do anything about it so I may as well not even try…

Well first of all, the presence of meltwater on the Arctic sea ice is not a new phenomenon. This one just got a lot more publicity. The point, though, is that if nobody tries to improve our environmental problems then of course they’ll never get any better! That’s why doomsday messaging like this can be downright counter-productive. It’s important to explain to people what action they can take and to celebrate progress, like the rebound in the ozone layer since the Montreal Protocol banned CFCs in the 1980s. Widespread and sustained action can indeed make a difference. A problem that took decades to create won’t be cleaned up overnight.

Aristotleded24

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Under capitalism rich people get to pool their assets to exploit resources without taking all the risks. That is the heart of our system and it is the problem killing our planet. If our fucking billionaires lost all their money and assets when they polluted their neighbours environment we would have no problem. However they get to hide behind a corporate veil that means the only assets up for grabs when they pillage the commons are peanuts in a shell company.

Our society is in the clutches of the Cult of the Invisible Hand and its high priests are the MBA's who believe in shareholder value above all else. All societies need to amass capital so it is all about who gets to control the use of that capital. Is is society's capital or not? Which side are you on has always been the question?

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