End violence against women: December 6

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Unionist
End violence against women: December 6

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Unionist

From the [url=http://www.caw.ca/en/9631.htm]CAW website[/url]:

Quote:
On December 6, CAW members across the country will organize memorials, forums and events to commemorate the 14 women who were murdered at L'École Polytechnique in Montreal in 1989. The day, marked as the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence against Women, provides an opening for all citizens and activists to challenge the issue of gender-based violence in Canada.

In a letter to CAW local union presidents as well as women's and human rights committees, Julie White, CAW Director of Women's Programs, said that this horrific event changed how Canadians confronted the issue of male violence against women. It also propelled the political mobilization of women within unions and across communities to demand societal change.

"We are breaking the silence around violence against women and men have been helping in this regard," White said. "As we continue our anti-violence campaign with women's equality seeking groups and the broader labour movement, we are hopeful that we are making a difference, but the numbers tell us otherwise."

Statistics suggest that today more than 49 women are killed each year by their partners or ex-partners in Canada.

"Eradicating violence against women lies in a systemic plan that includes well-funded support and counseling services for women. It includes a justice system that champions their rights rather than turning them once again into victims. It includes access to affordable housing, living wages and a national child care program. It also means access to unemployment benefits and decent pensions, and it means a national campaign aimed at ending violence against women," said White, who also noted that an impending federal election provides another opportunity to put gender-based violence on the political agenda.

RevolutionPlease RevolutionPlease's picture

You could start by laying off the one party that fights half-assedly for them.  Better than the zero-effort otherwise.

RevolutionPlease RevolutionPlease's picture

Virtue is fleeting.

Unionist

By the way, anyone who hasn't seen this incredible film should do so (I don't recall whether we discussed it on babble when it first came out last year):

[url=http://www.altfg.com/blog/movie/polytechnique-genie-awards-maxim-gaudett... Montreal Massacre Drama Sweeps Genie Awards[/url]

 

Unionist

[url=http://www.osstfd14.ca/home/?p=598]Ontario Secondary School Teachers' Federation mark December 6 - National Day of Remembrance[/url]

Quote:
This date is a time for OSSTF/FEESO and its members to remember this tragedy and take part in events to commemorate the lives of those women, and the millions of other women at home and around the world whose lives remain vulnerable to daily acts of discrimination and gender-based violence. It is also an opportunity, individually and collectively, to renew our efforts to end violence against women and girls in our schools, workplaces, homes, and communities.

This year, OSSTF/FEESO is again distributing a bilingual poster to each of our members as an insert in the November issue of Update. The poster uses the same vivid design as last year, linking our remembrance of the tragic events of December 6th with a commitment to action today. On the reverse side, information focuses on new protections that Bills 157 and 168 provide for women and girls as both students and workers in education.

 

Unionist

From the Canadian Labour Congress:

[url=http://www.canadianlabour.ca/14actions]December 6 is the National Day of Remembrance and Action on Violence against Women. On this day we remember and mourn the loss of 14 women, murdered at Montréal's École Polytechnique, murdered because they were women.  [/url]

Take action now by downloading the Make Women's Lives Count poster and brochure and share your stories of action and remembrance on Facebook or Twitter (using the hashtag #6dec).

Sineed

Unionist wrote:

By the way, anyone who hasn't seen this incredible film should do so (I don't recall whether we discussed it on babble when it first came out last year):

[url=http://www.altfg.com/blog/movie/polytechnique-genie-awards-maxim-gaudett... Montreal Massacre Drama Sweeps Genie Awards[/url]

 

I haven't wanted to see this.  For babblers who have, is this appropriate for teenage girls to see?  Or too nasty?

Unionist

My opinion: It's not appropriate. Not because it's too "nasty" - it's too empty. There's no explanation or analysis or situating it in a larger societal context.

Now I read that first para and have no idea if it's true. The event itself (which happened way too close to our home) still echoes too maddeningly. I'm not qualified to judge the film.

So why did I recommend it?

If there are women here who have seen it, I'd like to hear their comments and prefer that they answer your question.

Today is the day.

Wilf Day

Unionist wrote:

By the way, anyone who hasn't seen this incredible film should do so (I don't recall whether we discussed it on babble when it first came out last year):

[url=http://www.altfg.com/blog/movie/polytechnique-genie-awards-maxim-gaudett... Montreal Massacre Drama Sweeps Genie Awards[/url]

Quote:
Although Polytechnique grossed "a respectable" $1.8 million in Quebec, it earned a mere $100,000 elsewhere in Canada.

Typical. Do we have a bigger problem with anti-Quebec sentiments than with anti-feminist sentiments?

A memorial is planned this year in the Carpenter's Hall, 459 Croft St., Port Hope, Monday at 6 p.m.

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

Polytechnique, le tabou

Quote:
Polytechnique marque une cassure dans l'histoire contemporaine du Québec, une faille dans notre armure, qui non seulement n'a jamais été reconnue, mais qu'on aimerait plus souvent qu'autrement oublier. [...]

La question du tabou entourant Polytechnique me hante depuis 20 ans. Il y a bien sûr la question du traumatisme collectif, des puissants dégâts causés par la tragédie, des victimes qu'on connaît comme de toutes celles qu'on ne connaît pas. Il y a aussi ce que j'appelle la «guerre des sexes», le fait que la simple mention du 6 décembre, encore aujourd'hui, divise les chaumières comme jamais, souvent les femmes d'un bord et les hommes de l'autre, pour ce qui est de la signification des événements. Encore aujourd'hui, il y a ceux qui croient qu'il ne faut pas chercher midi à quatorze heures, que l'homme était «fou-un-point-c'est-tout», que cela n'influe aucunement sur le «qui sommes-nous». Et puis, il y a ceux, plus souvent celles, qui croient qu'il s'agit d'un geste éminemment politique, [...] pour ne rien dire de Lépine lui-même qui n'a pas hésité à qualifier son geste de vengeance politique.
Mais le tabou entourant Polytechnique va plus loin encore et, après 20 ans, je pense enfin comprendre pourquoi. Ce n'est pas simplement une question de traumatisme ou de chicanes de clocher. Il est difficile, voire parfois impossible, de parler de la tuerie du 6 décembre parce qu'il s'agit du premier événement depuis la Révolution tranquille, c'est-à-dire depuis la naissance du Québec moderne, qui vient brouiller les cartes de notre histoire.

Il y a eu, bien sûr, la Crise d'octobre, souvent qualifiée du moment où, tels Adam et Ève, nous avons perdu «notre innocence». Les événements de 1970 ont été extrêmement bouleversants, c'est clair, mais ne constituent pas à mon avis une cassure par rapport à l'histoire du Québec. Aussi dramatique qu'elle fût, cette crise s'inscrit parfaitement dans la mythologie québécoise: elle est un autre exemple de résistance face à l'envahisseur — qu'il se nomme «le fédéral» ou «les maudits Anglais». [...] La Crise d'octobre est en droite ligne avec la bataille des plaines d'Abraham et était en quelque sorte prévisible. La tuerie du 6 décembre ne l'était aucunement, et c'est pourquoi la vraie perte d'innocence, l'indéniable cassure dans l'histoire du Québec, survient avec elle, et non avec la Crise d'octobre.

Unionist
Maysie Maysie's picture

16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence

Quote:

THRIVE: Women's Voices Rising

SAT, DEC 11
9:30 am to 3:00 pm
Metro Hall
55 John Street
(King & John, 2 blocks east of Spadina)
Speakers, workshops, discussion
RSVP with registration form: thrive.forum@gmail.com OR click here.  

FOOD provided. ACCESSIBLE space. ASL and CHILDMINDING available (let us know by Nov 22nd). FREE.

Consider violence on a continuum or a spectrum - this means that in addition to the physical, financial and emotional violence that women* face and resist, but also the violence of racism, colonization, degraded environments and institutions. Join the THRIVE coalition for THRIVE: Women's Voices Rising!, a forum on violence, organizing to mark the 16 Days of Activism Against Gendered Violence.

On Saturday, December 11th, join community members and frontline workers for discussion circles, speakers, workshops and the opportunity to create spaces for dialogue, for conversation about gendered violence including the ways women resist.

Forum Outline:
9:30 am to 10:00 am - registration
10:00 am to 11:00 am - Opening + Panel
11:00 am to 12:00 pm - Discussion Circles
12:00 pm to 1:00 pm - lunch
1:00 pm to 2:00 pm - Workshops
2:00 pm to 3:00 pm - Closing

Participants can expect to speak about racism and decolonization, mental health, substance use, sex work, and much more. We will close the day with movement and/or sounds based activities to ground ourselves in this difficult work. Hear about issues and campaigns. Connect with other community members and activists.

For more information and to RSVP, register with the attached form at thrive.forum@gmail.com

*we have a trans inclusive understanding of women

Also: THRIVE presents the exhibit "Fabricating Violence: Fabric of Change" from November 25 to December 10 at the Raging Spoon (761 Queen Street West).

About THRIVE:
THRIVE, the Multicultural Women's Coalition Against Violence and Oppression, is a coalition of diverse women advancing a movement to end violence and oppression against racialized women and their communities by developing analyses and strategies to combat violence against racialized women and providing training, community-based research and political advocacy with and for racialized women.

About the 16 Days of Activism:
The 16 Days of Activism Against Gender Violence is an international campaign originating from the first Women's Global Leadership Institute sponsored by the Center for Women's Global Leadership in 1991. 

Iwant Liberty

The only "gender based violence in Canada" that occurs these days normally relates to honor killings.  I presume that this is targeted towards the mal-adjusted new citizens?

Maysie Maysie's picture

Iwant, based on your recent posts, you get a week off.

Unionist

[url=http://winnipeg.ctv.ca/servlet/an/local/CTVNews/20111206/montreal-massca... MPs not invited to Montreal massacre memorial[/url]

Quote:

Canadian politicians gathered on Parliament Hill to commemorate the 22nd anniversary of the gun slayings of 14 women at Montreal's Ecole Polytechnique, but Conservative MPs were not among them.

About 400 people attended the memorial Tuesday morning, including NDP interim leader Nycole Turmel and Liberal interim leader Bob Rae.

But organizers said they did not invite Conservative MPs because of the government's plan to scrap to the long-gun registry.

Suzanne Laplante Edward, whose daughter was among the women murdered at école Polytechnique, said the move to end the registry was a personal affront to her.

 

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

Caissa's comment from a previous thread:

Caissa wrote:
Geneviève Bergeron, Hélène Colgan, Nathalie Croteau, Barbara Daigneault, Anne-Marie Edward, Maud Haviernick, Maryse Laganière, Maryse Leclair, Anne-Marie Lemay, Sonia Pelletier, Michèle Richard, Annie St-Arneault, Annie Turcotte and Barbara Klucznik-Widajewicz. Never Forget

Moi, je me souviens.

MegB

Je me souviens aussi.

Catchfire Catchfire's picture

Quote:
The facts:

Violence against women and girls continues to be a serious issue in Canada:

  • In 2008, 146 female were murdered in Canada. Forty-five of these women were victims of spousal homicide. On average, 178 females were killed every year between 1994 and 2008;
  • It is estimated that 60% of Canadian women and girls have suffered from physical or psychological violence at some time in their life;
  • Between April 1, 2007 and March 31, 2008, approximately 101,000 women and children were admitted to 569 shelters in Canada;
  • According to the 2004 General Social Survey, Aboriginal women 15 years and older are three and a half times more likely to experience violence than non-Aboriginal women. The Native Women’s Association of Canada has documented evidence that 582 Aboriginal women and girls have gone missing or have been murdered in Canada in the past few decades; and
  • Annual costs of intimate partner violence is calculated at US$1.16 billion in Canada according to UNIFEM in its report The Facts: Violence Against Women & Millennium Development Goals.

Dec. 6 - Canada's National Day of Remembrance & Action on Violence Against Women

Maysie Maysie's picture

Women Won't Forget

Quote:

Join Us in a Day of Remembrance for Women Murdered by Men

22nd Anniversary of the Montreal Massacre

National Day of Action and Remembrance on Violence Against Women

TUESDAY DECEMBER 6 2011

6:00 PM

Philosopher's Walk
South side of Bloor, West of Avenue Road
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Candlelight Vigil

All welcome.
Bring a rose and candle.
Ceremony goes on regardless of weather.

 

Mr.Tea

A heads-up regarding the event posted above at philosopher's walk at UofT: the Jewish Defence League is attempting to hijack it and turn it into a rally against honour killings.

Wilf Day
lagatta

La Fédération des femmes du Québec is holding a gathering and commemoration of the Polytechnique Massacre on the 6th of December, this Saturday:

http://www.ffq.qc.ca/2014/11/6-decembre-rassemblement-et-commemoration-25/

The group Odaya will greet attendees with drums and song. https://www.facebook.com/pages/Odaya/22131337257

People attending will march up Mont-Royal from la Place du 6 décembre, near métro Côte-des-Neiges (and Université de Montréal). People unable to do the march can take the 11 bus to the summit.

Marie-Claude Lortie blogs about covering the terrifying event as a young reporter: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/polytechnique-shooting-shattered-...

mersh

I was in Montreal 25 years ago when this happened. To think that we still have to fight the active dismissal of the attack as random, "crazy" and undecipherable is an outrage:

 

After question period, MacKay said the massacre would never be understood “because of the insanity and the level of violence.”

lagatta

Sylvie Haviernick, whose sister Maud was one of the Polytechnique killings victims, speaks to Mike Finnerty of CBC Montréal about the tragedy, the years after, and the commemoration to take place later today at the National Assembly:

http://www.cbc.ca/player/Radio/Local+Shows/Quebec/Daybreak+Montreal/ID/2...

Mersh, I was two buildings away, writing a graduate history exam at Université de Montréal. The utter concentration of students during exam week is part of the explanation of how the killer could get in there, armed. After I returned home from my exam, people were phoning me from many countries to "make sure I was alive". Of course I knew nothing about the events, as the Social Sciences building is on the other side of the main building from Polytechnique, and I usually took a different métro station home. It took a while for the enormity of the massacre to sink in.

But McKay is an arsehole; time and again he has proven that.

Québec solidaire pays homage to the victims, at their Congrès national in Trois-Rivières:

http://ici.radio-canada.ca/regions/mauricie/2014/11/30/001-quebec-solida...

mersh

It was my first year as an undergrad and I was studying with a friend when one of her roommates came in and told us. I really didn't get it at first, and then a friend of mine died, and then, well, it started to sink in.

 

And here's a challenge from Michael Laxer right here on Rabble:

 

Men need to stand up for feminism

Struggling

Why do we deal so exclusively with the more extreme cases of violence against women while ignoring its subtler manifestations. I am a recovering sex addict myself, and though I have never struck a woman nor attacked one verbally, I would still say that I had engaged in a form of violence against women. Within a year after my divorce, past trauma, depression and a few other psychological factors and other circumstances combined with bad judgement let me to seek prostitutes. Over the years it developed into an addiction. Though it might not be thought of as violence in the usual sense, it is still an exploitation of women and coercion even if it is mutually consentual. Mutual consent does not mean there can be no coercion. Even if only carrots and no sticks are presented, it is still coercion and a form of violence. Additionally it puts women at risk of STD's. One problem though is that sex addicts might not always be aware of the resources available to them and sometimes fantasies themselves become ever more extreme or even violent over time as the old ones become boring. They might not necessarily be acted on, but thought is the first step to action. Even if they have read of sex or other therapy they might have false conceptions about it thinking it's just talking with no understanding of its potential benefit to actions

I have created a thread on the regulation of the advertizing of sexual services. Though it is more of a brainstorm at present, I would be curious as to your ideas on this as a practical step to curb these subtler forms of violence too before they increase in intensity.

 

Struggling

Struggling

Another point I can make is avoiding politically charged terminology in the therapeutic field. I remember as I started seeking therapists online as my thoughts started becoming more violent, I had come across one describing herself as applying 'feminist' principles to her therapy. I believe in the equality of men and women, and we should not assume that a sex addict's actions are congruent with his beliefs. I knew I was doing wrong from the beginning and it disgusted me. However, sense 'feminism' can have so many meanings to different people, that ad scared me away from her. I knew I was doing wrong and so did not need to be judged but helped.

Of course all if what I am saying here deals with subtler forms of violence. But how many murderous rages trace their roots back to subtler manifestations?

Struggling

Another point I can make is avoiding politically charged terminology in the therapeutic field. I remember as I started seeking therapists online as my thoughts started becoming more violent, I had come across one describing herself as applying 'feminist' principles to her therapy. I believe in the equality of men and women, and we should not assume that a sex addict's actions are congruent with his beliefs. I knew I was doing wrong from the beginning and it disgusted me. However, sense 'feminism' can have so many meanings to different people, that ad scared me away from her. I knew I was doing wrong and so did not need to be judged but helped.

Of course all if what I am saying here deals with subtler forms of violence. But how many murderous rages trace their roots back to subtler manifestations?

Maysie Maysie's picture

Get the fuck out of this thread.

Struggling

Sorry.

Maysie Maysie's picture

Women Won't Forget: Vigil in Toronto

Quote:

Join Us in a Day of Remembrance for Women Murdered by Men

25th Anniversary of the Montreal Massacre

National Day of Action and Remembrance on Violence Against Women

SATURDAY DECEMBER 6 2014

6:00 PM

Philosopher's Walk
South side of Bloor, West of Avenue Road
Toronto, Ontario, Canada

Candlelight Vigil

All welcome.
Bring a rose and candle.
Ceremony goes on regardless of weather.

Vigil consists of a Native healing ceremony, speakers, and musical and spoken word performances, including 

  • The daughter of a murdered indigenous woman
  • Katarina MacLeod
  • Renée Ashanta Henry & Charmie Deller (musicians)
  • Gabriel V Nicolau (spoken word)

 

 

December 6th FundDonate if you can

Quote:

What does this program offer?

Loans of up to $750 can be used to:

  • pay rent
  • pay hydro
  • pay bills in arrears
  • buy furniture
  • cover moving expenses
  • cover other approved items

 

Who is this program for? 

Women who:

  • are fleeing an abusive situation within the last nine months
  • have a bank account
  • have a source of income (social assistance is accepted)
  • have a support letter from a referral agency
  • live in Toronto or the Region of Peel
  • over 18 years of age 

Maysie Maysie's picture

Thank you.

lagatta

I wish struggling's posts could be removed from this thread. There are lots of categories where they could fit, anything about addiction or mental health. Having them here makes it "all about" men's problems, and I don't feel it is appropriate. I'm not saying this to attempt to censor his posts.

Maysie, thanks for the initiative. I do wish people would remember that it is the Polytechnique massacre, moreover, alas not the only massacre or attempted massacre to have occurred at an institution of higher education in Montréal. Sadly, a massacre at Concordia University followed only a few years later, and some years on, the killer "only killed one person" at Dawson College. Her name was Anastasia de Sousa, and she was only 18.

Lessons the police had learnt in the earlier massacres may have contributed to the lower death toll. One of the police arriving at Polytechnique was the father of one of the students killed there.

Struggling

Again I apologize and agree with lagata. It was a terrible lapse in judgement and would be happy to have my posts removed. It pains me to know they may offend people here.

I wasn't thinking when I posted. My apologies again.

lagatta

If they are removed, please remove my first paragraph about them.

Pondering

I know that it is rare but please do remove the posts in question. This thread above all should remain untainted.

Unionist

By Cody Crick, Chair, Unifor BC Young Workers Committee:

[url=http://www.unifor.org/en/blog/remembering-and-calling-action-violence-ag... and calling for action on violence against women[/url]

Quote:
As a man, I understand that violence against women will never end if we don't take responsibility to end it. As a young person, it will be myself and my peers who are at the forefront of ending violence against women in the workplace. For the next 25 years and for years beyond that, I hope to be part of the generation of people who make the commitment to true equality; to call out violence, sexism and homophobia; to speak out against violence when we see it; to believe the women who come forward with stories of harassment and assault; and to refuse to perpetuate violence wherever I am, whether that be at home, at work, or walking down the street.

NS NS's picture

mersh wrote:

I was in Montreal 25 years ago when this happened. To think that we still have to fight the active dismissal of the attack as random, "crazy" and undecipherable is an outrage:

 

After question period, MacKay said the massacre would never be understood “because of the insanity and the level of violence.”

 

Some comments on twitter made the point that McKay had no problem calling the attacks in Ottawa "terrorism" and mind- reading the perps but is having a hard time figuring out the motivations of a known misogynist and woman-killer.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/peter-mackay-s-comments-on-montreal-massacre-set-off-twitter-furor-1.2858739

Sineed

If I may quote myself from another thread:

I wrote:

The Montreal victims were engineering students, and women remain a small minority within that profession.

Whenever women enter into a profession that is traditionally dominated by men, they suffer abuse that is frequently violent. At the time of the massacre, my first reaction was, so this guy objected to women in "his" space. I don't remember if he randomly chose that classroom, but it always struck me as telling that a guy who wants to murder women goes to the one class where there is likely to be the smallest proportion of them. I mean, he didn't go over to the nursing school and start shooting.

Peter MacKay's comments give me a notion. Maybe to get the attention it deserves, we need to call it gender-based terrorism.

Unionist

[url=http://www.thestar.com/opinion/commentary/2014/12/04/clc_leader_we_all_h... Labour Congress president Hassan Yussuff says governments should work with unions to stamp out violence and harassment in the workplace[/url]

Quote:

Here are three ways we believe governments can help:

  • First, governments can bring stakeholders together to examine the survey results and discuss what employers, unions and governments can do to address this issue. We have asked federal Labour Minister Kellie Leitch to work with us to convene a roundtable, and we encourage provincial and territorial governments to do the same. Everyone has an equal stake in this and the survey results should be seen as a wake up call to us all that we need to take this problem seriously.
  • Second, provincial and territorial governments can follow Ontario’s lead in amending Occupational Health & Safety legislation to place positive obligations on employers to protect workers from domestic violence, and also consider amendments to employment standards that give the right to request flexible working arrangements and entitlement to paid domestic violence leave. In addition to this, the federal government can review the federal violence in the workplace provisions to ensure that it recognizes domestic violence as a workplace issue.
  • Third, governments can commit to examining community-based supports and services and listen to the service providers and anti-violence organizations about the kinds of investments needed by both victims and perpetrators.
  • For our part, the CLC will be working with our member unions to identify promising practices in collective bargaining, such as the paid domestic violence leave negotiated by the Yukon Teachers’ Association and Australian unions, as well as innovative peer support programs like Unifor’s Women’s Advocates or the Postal Workers’ network of Social Stewards.

    Unionist

    On the eve of the 25th anniversary of this dark day, all parties in the National Assembly re-dedicate their pledge to have a Québec arms registry, irrespective of how the Supreme Court decides on the retention of the federal data.

    [url=http://www.ledevoir.com/politique/quebec/425935/armes-a-feu-le-quebec-au...ébec will have its registry[/url]

    [In French.]

     

    Unionist

    Geneviève Bergeron;
    Hélène Colgan;
    Nathalie Croteau;
    Barbara Daigneault;
    Anne-Marie Edward;
    Maud Haviernick;
    Barbara Klucznik-Widajewicz;
    Maryse Laganière;
    Maryse Leclair;
    Anne-Marie Lemay;
    Sonia Pelletier;
    Michèle Richard;
    Annie St-Arneault;
    Annie Turcotte.

    Je m'en souviens.

    lagatta

    A majority of the many people Anders Behring Breivik slaughtered were also women and teenage girls. His "manifesto" reeks of misogyny as well as racism.

    Unionist

    [url=http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/polytechnique-shooting-25th-anniv... mourns 14 victims of Polytechnique massacre 25 years later[/url]

     

    sherpa-finn

    Lots of media coverage on December 6th related events and issues today. FWIW, I thought this reflective piece by Shelley Page was the best thing I read on it today.

    How I sanitized the feminist outrage over the Montreal massacre

    I arrived in Montreal four hours after the killing was done. Yellow tape wrapped l’École Polytechnique like a macabre Christmas present; surviving students gripped each other in numb disbelief.

    I was 24, sent by the Toronto Star to write about the slaughter of female engineering students, all around my age; fourteen of them.

    Looking back, I fear I sanitized the event of its feminist anger and then infantilized and diminished the victims, turning them from elite engineering students who’d fought for a place among men into teddy-bear loving daughters, sisters and girlfriends.....

    http://ottawacitizen.com/news/national/page-how-i-sanitized-the-feminist-outrage-over-the-montreal-massacre

    Sineed

    From sherpa-finn's link, previous post.

    Quote:

    They weren’t killed for being daughters or girlfriends, but because they were capable women in a male-dominated field.

    Yes. I have thought this for 25 years.

    lagatta

    Francine Pelletier, whom as we recall was on the killer's hit list, says essentially the same:

    http://www.ledevoir.com/societe/actualites-en-societe/425670/ce-qu-il-re...

    A more general article about media coverage at the time: http://www.ledevoir.com/societe/actualites-en-societe/426023/tragedie-de...

    We also recall that the vile scum and cyberscab Richard Martineau denounced "feminists" who were "exploiting" the tragedy, in his Voir column back then.

    Unionist

    I posted that yesterday. It's the 25th anniversary.

    And I'm very pessimistic these days about what, if anything, has changed in 25 years. Bill C-36 is an example showing that even well-intentioned people can't tell the difference between increasing or decreasing the risk of violence against women. Likewise with "progressives" (outside Québec, without exception) calling gun control a "divisive" issue. And debating whether schoolgirls should be harassed and suspended for violating puritanical sexist "dress codes".

    Where the hell is our society going?

    Please tell me something reassuring.

    Glenl

    Over my life I think I've seen improvement, not fast enough or far enough, but in the right direction. It comes with unforgivable setbacks and tragedies but it continues persistently and hopefully irreversibly. I'm not suggesting society be patient or tolerant, just answering the call for reassurance.

    lagatta

    The commemoration ceremony of the 25th anniversary of the Polytechnique Massacre at Chalet de la Montagne, Montréal:

    http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/montreal/polytechnique-shooting-25th-anniv...

    This is mostly in French: no subtitles on either French or English. And is almost 2 hours long. Some comments much stronger than others, especially those by former mayor Jean Doré, most forthright among male commentators that it was a femicide, and of course by Francine Pelletier and Monique Simard, two of the women on the killer's hitlist.

    Pages