babble-intro-img
babble is rabble.ca's discussion board but it's much more than that: it's an online community for folks who just won't shut up. It's a place to tell each other — and the world — what's up with our work and campaigns.

Television and film award shows are boring

Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

I can say this: if I'm at the Golden Globes and someone hands me Meryl Streep's reading glasses, they are going in my pocket. End of.


Comments

Mr.Tea
Online
Joined: Jul 9 2011

I was expecting better from Ricky Gervais. He toned it down.

I was glad to see Scorcese win Best Director for "Hugo", which I really liked. And Morgan Freeman (one of my favourites) getting the lifetime achievement award was great and he gave a lovely speech.


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

I didn't watch much of the awards--I was watching when Streep won for a depoliticized depiction of Thatcher. Which is rather like a zombie movie with no zombies. Her speech was the usual affectatious stuff I've grown to expect from these things, since seeing Halle Berry's awful "emotional" Oscar acceptance speech from a few years back.

Award shows do serve as occasions to talk about the films and tv shows, though. Although I haven't seen many of those either. As a big fan of silent film, though, I really want to see The Artist, which looks really interesting.

I saw Rise of the Planet of the Apes on Saturday night, and it looks much better than any of the stuff up for awards last night. At least it's not pretending...


CMOT Dibbler
Offline
Joined: May 17 2003
Rise of the Planet of the Apes is better than The Artist?

Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

Heh. I haven't seen The Artist yet, although I want to. I imagine it's probably better than Apes, but I'd take Apes over most of the other options! I thought it was a really, really good sci-fi B-movie. Have you seen it, CMOT? 


CMOT Dibbler
Offline
Joined: May 17 2003
Yup, I have. Probably the 2nd best apes movie, after the original, and ten times better then that sack of steaming bullshit that Tim Burton produced back in 2001.

milo204
Offline
Joined: Feb 3 2010

these shows, like the music industry awards are nothing but a glorified employee of the year ceremony for hollywood insiders.  


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

 

Why the Oscars should cast out The Help and welcome in Pariah

Quote:
In an industry where 2005's best picture winner Crash passes for progressive racial politics, it's no wonder why the keepers of the key have an issue recognising the twisted portrayals of people of colour and their stories. It passes on nearly every opportunity it has to award authentic, complicated, three-dimensional black characters and films.

Over the years, the Academy could have easily honoured Charles Burnett's Killer of Sheep, Julie Dash's Daughters of the Dust, Tanya Hamilton's Night Catches Us, or even Spike Lee's Do the Right Thing and Malcolm X. The Color Purple received 11 nominations, and struck out in every category. Just one win for any of these films would have dulled the sting that comes along with witnessing the Oscars celebrate black dysfunction in the form of Precious. But they've consistently failed.

It's worse when you start factoring in gender. The margin is slim, but black men have fared better with the Academy than black women. Black women have captured attention and wide critical acclaim by fulfilling only the basest of stereotypes. Viola Davis is one of the finest actresses working today. Her performance in The Help is truly remarkable. But what does it mean that in 2012 the best role available to her, according the standards set by the industry, is no different than what would have been available in 1939? What does it mean that Halle Berry became the first black woman to win best actress by embodying the lascivious jezebel? What does it mean when Mo'Nique's big win comes for portraying what amounts to an angry black welfare queen? These aren't the outliers. Black women don't have the luxury of a large number of nominations or wins for there to be any outliers. They aren't exceptions, rather they are the rule. There has been no progression.

 


Ripple
Offline
Joined: Mar 3 2010

I thought this was an entertaining interview with Melissa Harris-Perry on the Colbert Report on stereotyping black women in America. Harris-Perry has written a new book called Sister Citizen: Shame, Stereotypes, and Black Women in America.


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

That's a great interview! Thanks, Ripple.

This found my inbox this morning:

Heh. It's about right. Some of the other ones are good too.


Michelle
Offline
Joined: May 10 2001

There's a whole site dedicated to criticizing The Help, both book and film.


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

Great site. "Mammyhood prevails" indeed.


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

 

I’M NOT OKAY WITH CHRIS BROWN PERFORMING AT THE GRAMMYS AND I’M NOT SURE WHY YOU ARE

Quote:
I’m sick and tired of people acting like it’s no big deal that Chris Brown will be performing at the Grammys.

I’m frustrated that the mainstream media is covering this story like it’s any comeback story, like an exiled prince’s return to a former glory, like this is another political timeline — as though some rich and powerful old white men in the music business have not just issued an enormous ‘f**k you’ to every woman who has been, is or will be on the receiving end of domestic violence.

We should be furious.

Why aren’t we?

Check out this cracker from the Grammy Executive Producer:

Quote:
“We’re glad to have him back,” said executive producer Ken Ehrlich. “I think people deserve a second chance, you know. If you’ll note, he has not been on the Grammys for the past few years and it may have taken us a while to kind of get over the fact that we were the victim of what happened.

 

 


Mr.Tea
Online
Joined: Jul 9 2011

I'm not sure how I feel about Brown returning. I mean, it goes without saying that what he did was despicable and disgusting but is nobody ever allowed a second chance?


Boom Boom
Offline
Joined: Dec 29 2004

I haven't watched the Grammys in over a decade - I think it's the most artificial piece of crap in existence. And with all the maudlin crap about how tearful it's going to be with the Whitney Houston tributes tonight, wild horses couldn't drag me to the television tonight. I'll just go to bed early.

 


pookie
Offline
Joined: Dec 13 2005

Say what you will - Alicia Keys singing Etta James with the incomparable Bonnie Raitt is pretty cool (though currently on mute through the woman beater).


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

Quote:
but is nobody ever allowed a second chance?

This refrain seems to be the most popular justification for Brown's presence. He's 22. Would that all "second chances" come so young on a stage so large. You'll also have to point me to the honest, introspective acknowledgement of his violent act that doesn't reek of a PR move. And of course, there's the fact that Rihanna is als at the Grammies, and apparently has no say as to whether or not she wishes to be faced with her abuser (although I hear they're back together). It's further disgusting because of the maudlin tributes to Whitney Houston, whose abusive partner shares no small role in her candle being snuffed so early.

And yes: <3 to Etta and Alicia.


Mr.Tea
Online
Joined: Jul 9 2011

I hear what you're saying. I think he got off easy but he served his punishment and is still on probation. How long is long enough? In 10 years, can he be celebrated for his music? Should someone be snubbed the rest of their life because of a mistake? I mean, Michael Vick went to prison for torturing and killing animals and he's back playing pro football. I still have trouble cheering for him but he's done his time, he can hopefully move on in his life and be more positive.


milo204
Offline
Joined: Feb 3 2010

I'm sure there ARE plenty of people who have abandoned him, but the industry will not do that until he stops making money for them.  Why do people have any other expectation coming from a massive corporation?  Do we forget they are motivated by profits, and that's it?    

As far as they're concerned, "there's no such thing as bad publicity"...


Mr.Tea
Online
Joined: Jul 9 2011

In other Grammy news, Adele just absolutely nailed it. Best voice in music today.


Freedom 55
Offline
Joined: Mar 14 2010

Mr.Tea wrote:

I'm not sure how I feel about Brown returning. I mean, it goes without saying that what he did was despicable and disgusting but is nobody ever allowed a second chance?

 

His second chance is the fact that people are apparently still buying his music and paying to see him perform.

 

In deciding which 30 or so artists to highlight during the ceremony, the producers were choosing from a pool of literally hundreds of mainstream performers that are at least on par with Chris Brown in terms of talent and stature. There was no need for them to give him tacit absolution by providing him a platform in front of an audience of tens of millions, especially since as recently as last March he still seemed confused about who was the wronged party in this whole situation.


Maysie
Offline
Joined: Apr 21 2005

Mr Tea wrote:
 Should someone be snubbed the rest of their life because of a mistake?  

Which part was the mistake? Beating up Rihanna? Or getting caught?

And this is beyond disturbing: 25 Extremely Upsetting Reactions to Chris Brown at the Grammys. What The Fuck?


Mr.Tea
Online
Joined: Jul 9 2011

He won an award last night. I would have liked to see him, in accepting the award, say that while he's grateful for the award, he's even more grateful for the second chance that he's been given and that what he did was inexcusable and that he wants to be a better role model in the future. He didn't even acknowledge it. Disappointing.


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003
Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

The Nominees for the Best Performance of Gender Are...

Quote:
You see, how we perform our gender matters....Each choice of gesture and facial expression, each piece of clothing we select or avoid, signifies a step towards or away from the traditional expectations of what a man or a woman should do. From how we sit on the subway to what we eat for dinner, all of our daily actions are coded with gendered meaning.

Because the movies magnify all those choices, they offer a wonderful laboratory for observing gender performance at work. And this year's Best Actress nominees all played parts that illuminate the continuum of gender in compelling and moving ways.

As [Glenn] Close plays him, Albert Nobbs is a quiet, retiring, soft-featured man. His occupation as a waiter in a hotel in the late 1800s requires that he hold his body erect and that his movements be economical and efficient, so that he can pass persuasively as a man and guard the secret of his sex.

Close's performance of Albert's masculinity in Nobbs is different from Janet McTeer's as Hubert Page, the housepainter whom Albert learns is also a woman living as a man. Page's masculinity is terse, marked by his solitary work. Page takes up space differently than Albert, moving through his world with larger gestures and freer movements. Part of the film's genius, in fact, is how it showcases these two very different women's performances of masculinity.

Consider the more extreme feminine end of the gender continuum, on which I would place Michelle Williams' portrait of the iconic 1950s movie star in My Week with Marilyn. Williams has described how she painstakingly learned and rehearsed Monroe's signature walk. Her movements were dictated by her tight dresses and provoked by an hourglass figure that seems unnatural to most women in the 21st century (except, perhaps, Christina Hendricks, whose signature shape lets her play another 1950s woman in the television series, Mad Men). Williams couldn't perform as Monroe just because they share female biology; she had to learn how to perform the star's distinct femininity.

Rooney Mara's Lisbeth Salander, the fierce computer hacker in director David Fincher's adaptation of the popular Stieg Larsson book, The Girl with the Dragon Tattoo, falls at the middle of the gender continuum, where masculinity and femininity blur. Mara's makeup and costume hides Lisbeth's body under facial piercings, ripped t-shirts and baggy cargo pants. And in shots of her riding her motorcycle, Lisbeth wears a helmet with a shield that completely obscures her face -- she could be a man or woman, of any age or race, for that matter.

Great piece by Jill Dolan


6079_Smith_W
Online
Joined: Jun 10 2010

Michelle wrote:

There's a whole site dedicated to criticizing The Help, both book and film.

Wow. I have heard about this one, but is it Forrest Gump bad?

 


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

Hugo just won the Oscar for best Sound Editing. Sorry for my thread title. I don't know what I was thinking. The Academy Awards are amazing.

ETA. And sound mixing. I can barely contain myself.


Rebecca West
Offline
Joined: Nov 28 2001

From the always classy Nat'l Pest, nothing is more noteworthy than the possibility that Jennifer Lopez's dress may have been too revealing. 

*much eye-rolling*


M. Spector
Offline
Joined: Feb 19 2005

Quote:
I usually like watching Meryl Streep, but I seriously hope that she doesn’t win an Oscar on Sunday for her portrayal of Margaret Thatcher. I couldn’t stand the thought of more people going to see such a dreadful piece of right-wing propaganda.  I actually paid money to see The Iron Lady, a new film that is ostensibly about the life of Thatcher (nicknamed “the milk snatcher” for ending free school milk). All I could think about during the torturous 100 minutes, was what great timing this film is for the Republicans. Just as they try to sell neoliberal ideology to an increasingly impoverished working class, here comes a movie that celebrates one of their most ardent proponents. From the reviews, I expected a sanitized version of Thatcher’s hideously destructive policies, but this was so sanitized that you would have thought that this poor, misunderstood woman was in fact the best thing that ever happened to Britain since Marmite.

- Gail Dines


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

 

Iron Lady lost in Russian translation

Quote:
Speaking to a crowd of supporters, Margaret Thatcher, as played by Meryl Streep in The Iron Lady, explains what she would do as prime minister: "Crush the working class, crush the scum, the yobs."

At least that is a scene from a pirated version of the film in Russia, which has been inadvertently reviewed by one of the country's top film critics without realising that some rather pointed changes to the script had been made. The pirated Russian translation of the film, voiced over in a monotone by one man, depicts Thatcher as a bloodthirsty, Hitler-admiring leader, whose fondest desire is to destroy the working class. While some of her critics might say this is an accurate representation of her plans, even her fiercest enemy would concede the Russian version takes it too far. The translation, no matter how over the top, has fooled at least one film critic on the Russian newspaper Kommersant, who quoted parts of the pirated version in a generally positive review.

 


Catchfire
Offline
Joined: Apr 16 2003

Comment viewing options

Select your preferred way to display the comments and click "Save settings" to activate your changes.
Login or register to post comments