MMIWG issues final report

63 posts / 0 new
Last post
WWWTT
MMIWG issues final report

I don’t see myself as the most qualified babbler to be starting a thread about the Indigenous people’s of the Western Hemisphere. So don’t let that stop anyone from posting 

Here’s the link 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/mmiwg-inquiry-deliver-final-report-justice-reforms-1.5158223

 

WWWTT

Here’s two sections of the report that will send it down the burning ring of fire

2.1 Acknowledge, recognize, and protect the rights of Indigenous Peoples to their cultures and languages as constitutionally protected inherent rights.

2.2 Recognize Indigenous languages as official languages, with the same status, recognition, and protection provided to French and English.

taken from here

 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/indigenous/mmiwg-inquiry-report-1.5158385#Justice

Canadian government isn’t going to tinker around with the charter! This is because the rights of Canadians (according to the government) is not as important as Canada preserving the current status quo. 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Languages fall under the Official Languages Act, so they could revisit that easily enough.  The other rights wouldn't need to be added to the Constitution if the existing Constitution were interpreted so as to ensure them.

WWWTT

I heard from ctv tv news that the report suggested the constitution be amended. But I can’t find it in the links I provided. 

Also, during Justins address at the Report release, he wouldn’t use the word genocide. And apparently this drew some criticism. 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

I hope that something happens. I personally thought that we had figured it all out with this report. To bad it has never been implemented. Hell I'll bet many of the suggestions have been recycled from it because we don't need any more fucking reports we need action.

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100014597/1100100014637

WWWTT

Thanks for posting that report kropotkin. A lot of it is actually a rewriting of history by the victors.

swallow swallow's picture

The constitution affirms existing Aboriginal rights. So no need to re-open. 

Official language rights are easy to legislate. Well, not easily, because there are plenty of asshole Senators who will block and stall, but easy in theory. 

Pondering

So how are we going to translate all government documentation into these languages? How will we find judges that speak so many languages? 

https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-314-x/98-314-x2011003_3-eng.cfm

Michif, the traditional language of the Métis, was reported as mother tongue by 640 people living mainly in Saskatchewan, Manitoba or Alberta.

Any of those 640 people qualified for the position of Supreme Court judge?  Can they also speak all the other indigenous languages plus French and English? 

So far I have yet to hear any concrete actions we can take to end the murders of indigenous women. I find myself agreeing with Harper on one score. We didn't need another study or inquiry. We know why indigenous women are more vulnerable and we know what needs to be done to even begin to stem the tide. Calling it genocide is satisfyingly dramatic but it won't save a single life. It's nothing more than theatrics. 

Pondering

kropotkin1951 wrote:

I hope that something happens. I personally thought that we had figured it all out with this report. To bad it has never been implemented. Hell I'll bet many of the suggestions have been recycled from it because we don't need any more fucking reports we need action.

https://www.aadnc-aandc.gc.ca/eng/1100100014597/1100100014637

Yup

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Pondering wrote:

So how are we going to translate all government documentation into these languages? How will we find judges that speak so many languages? 

https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/as-sa/98-314-x/98-314-x2011003_3-eng.cfm

Michif, the traditional language of the Métis, was reported as mother tongue by 640 people living mainly in Saskatchewan, Manitoba or Alberta.

Any of those 640 people qualified for the position of Supreme Court judge?  Can they also speak all the other indigenous languages plus French and English? 

It's a really good thing that a number of years ago simultaneous translations were invented.

Unionist

kropotkin1951 wrote:

It's a really good thing that a number of years ago simultaneous translations were invented.

True. The tools exist. But the first time simultaneous translation was ever provided for an Indigenous speech in the House of Commons was January 28, 2019. Our society has a long way to go, and we (settlers) are reluctant to take the first steps.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Strange though that people generally think it is okay that our PM needs to speak both official languages. Outside of Quebec the highest percentage of people who report French as their mother tongue is in the Yukon with 4.6%. BC is below average with 1.5%. Mother tongue is not the same as the number of people who can speak a language and our society already excludes the majority of people from many government positions because they do not speak one of either French or English. Federations are supposed to be places were minority rights are protected so it would seem that Indigenous nations need to be respected as well.

Unionist

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Strange though that people generally think it is okay that our PM needs to speak both official languages.

Yeah, why is it so important that the PM speak English? I don't get it. They generally just open their mouths and proceed to embarrass themselves.

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Outside of Quebec the highest percentage of people who report French as their mother tongue is in the Yukon with 4.6%. 

Do you really believe that the over 30% of New Brunswickers who identify as Francophone had something else as their "mother tongue"? Please cite your source for these claims.

Badriya

Thanks for posting, Unionist.  I was just checking on the percentage, which is 32-33% of New Brunswickers, mostly Acadians.

zazzo

Pondering wrote: "We know why indigenous women are more vulnerable and we know what needs to be done to even begin to stem the tide."  

I'd be interested in Pondering letting us know who the 'we' is, the why, and what needs to be done.  I've just started reading the report, and it is going to take awhile.

NDPP
WWWTT

His name is Justin I think?

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Unionist wrote:

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Strange though that people generally think it is okay that our PM needs to speak both official languages.

Yeah, why is it so important that the PM speak English? I don't get it. They generally just open their mouths and proceed to embarrass themselves.

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Outside of Quebec the highest percentage of people who report French as their mother tongue is in the Yukon with 4.6%. 

Do you really believe that the over 30% of New Brunswickers who identify as Francophone had something else as their "mother tongue"? Please cite your source for these claims.

You seem to have missed this essential part of what I was trying to say.

"Federations are supposed to be places were minority rights are protected so it would seem that Indigenous nations need to be respected as well."

Unionist for someone who reserves the right to use sarcasm when you feel like it maybe you should try looking for it in your allys' posts instead of presuming the worst.

I was also trying to highlight the stupid use of the term mother tongue. In fact it, like many of the things Pondering spews is a ridiculous and nearly meaningless term but it actually is a term of art in our demographic profile. Here is the cite I am using for those so easily offended by statistics.

https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/lang-tab-eng.cfm

If you want to talk about how many people can speak the language then you need to look at this chart. By the way BC has more people that speak both official languages than NB. BC is third because of pouplation I am sure and NB is fourth. Quebec has more bilingual speakers than all of Canada combined.

https://www12.statcan.gc.ca/census-recensement/2011/dp-pd/hlt-fst/lang/P...

Unionist

Oh FFS krop, stop diverting. You made a mistake. You said, "Outside of Quebec the highest percentage of people who report French as their mother tongue is in the Yukon with 4.6%." In fact, your own source shows that 32% of New Brunswickers reported French as their "mother tongue". How about saying: "Sorry, I was wrong, typing too fast, whatever, but I maintain my principal points, which are as follows..." You made a mistake. I corrected it. You're welcome.

Pondering

zazzo wrote:

Pondering wrote: "We know why indigenous women are more vulnerable and we know what needs to be done to even begin to stem the tide."  

I'd be interested in Pondering letting us know who the 'we' is, the why, and what needs to be done.  I've just started reading the report, and it is going to take awhile.

They are more vulnerable because their communities were destroyed by systematic poor treatment for generations. The residential school system destroyed families and communties. A community with no young is a community with no future. Now entire communities are dysfunctional and hopeless. This has led to violence and abuse within the community. Women also turn to hitch-hiking to get around and for some survival prostitution. 

There is no quick fix. The kind of damage Canada has done can't be repaired. What has been done cannot be undone. The best we can do is work on reconcilliation including funding efforts to repair the damage. That means insuring decent housing, shelters from domestic violence, education, and health care as a bare minimum. 

swallow swallow's picture

Canada could try some of the report’s recommendations, there is lots that can be done there. 

JKR

Pondering wrote:

They are more vulnerable because their communities were destroyed by systematic poor treatment for generations. The residential school system destroyed families and communties. A community with no young is a community with no future. Now entire communities are dysfunctional and hopeless. This has led to violence and abuse within the community.

I think this description is too bleak. I have been to a couple of Reserves that are generally considered to be “impoverished” and faced with a lot of social challenges but I think that is just a small part of what those First Nations are about. On the Reserves I have been to I found that there was a lot of happiness, joy, and community spirit, at least as much as I have found in other parts of Canada. On those Reserves I also found that families were often closer knit than elsewhere. I also found that the people living on those Reserves were multi-faceted with all sorts of different interests and exceptional and inspiring insights and abilities.

Pondering

kropotkin1951 wrote:

I was also trying to highlight the stupid use of the term mother tongue. In fact it, like many of the things Pondering spews is a ridiculous and nearly meaningless term but it actually is a term of art in our demographic profile.

Please quote where I used the term "mother tongue" because I don't think I did. In any case it is simply a term that means the first language a person spoke. 

I don't think instantaneous translation is a part of language rights in Canada. Where will you find a Supreme Court Judge that speaks French, English, and numerous indigenous languages? Even just the main three languages. Approximately 5% of Canada's population is indigenous and they speak many different languages. From a practical perspective they can't be given even status with French and English. 

Doesn't the Truth and Reconcilliation Report have a long list of steps we must take, honoring treaties and such like? 

To me debating if indigenous languages should have the same status as French and English, or if French should have the status that it does, is like debating how many angels can dance on the head of a pin. It's very academic at a time when there are urgent changes that need to be made. The number of children in care in Manitoba is an ongoing tragedy. Among those children are the future missing and murdered women. 

There is no doubt in my mind that what has been done to indigenous people is horrific. 

https://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/indigenous-missing-murdered-women-genocide-trudeau-1.5162541

"My definition of genocide, I read it very deliberately at the start of the Rwandan genocide," he told CBC News. "And it was a deliberate act of a government to exterminate, deliberately and by force and directly, an ethnicity or a group of human beings. And that meant actually going and slaughtering people."

Dallaire said that the commissioners were right to highlight the systemic racism and double standards that have blighted the Indigenous experience in this country, and Canada's "horrible failure" to ensure that all its citizens are protected.

"That is scandalous and that is unacceptable in a country that has a Charter and believes that all humans are human," he said.

"Is that an act of genocide? Is it? Is it deliberate, do we want that to happen? Or is our government just that inept and has been that irresponsible to these people over all these years?

"I'm simply having a problem of going and leaping to an international convention on a definition of ... not only abuse of human rights, but mass atrocities and a deliberate aim by a government to destroy a society, to destroy an ethnicity, to eliminate it. That's what I lived through. And that's what I saw as a genocide."

I don't agree with Dallaire entirely but I do believe the word needs the qualifier of colonial genocide. I also think the debate over whether or not it is currently genocide is a distraction. 

Pondering

JKR wrote:

Pondering wrote:

They are more vulnerable because their communities were destroyed by systematic poor treatment for generations. The residential school system destroyed families and communties. A community with no young is a community with no future. Now entire communities are dysfunctional and hopeless. This has led to violence and abuse within the community.

I think this description is too bleak. I have been to a couple of Reserves that are generally considered to be “impoverished” and faced with a lot of social challenges but I think that is just a small part of what those First Nations are about. On the Reserves I have been to I found that there was a lot of happiness, joy, and community spirit, at least as much as I have found in other parts of Canada. On those Reserves I also found that families were often closer knit than elsewhere. I also found that the people living on those Reserves were multi-faceted with all sorts of different interests and exceptional and inspiring insights and abilities.

That some people on some reserves are doing better doesn't help the missing and murdered women nor the children removed from their families. As a whole the indigenous population is considerably worse off than the rest of us. 

NDPP

Bruce Clark: Immunity From Prosecution For Genocide

https://dissidentvoice.org/author/bruceclark/

"...As Daschuk did his Ph.D on the historical fact of genocide in Canada, I did mine on the constitutional history of precisely how the genocide was implemented specifically by the [politicians,] judges and lawyers of the country. At all material times since 1876 the Attorney General has been the architect and implementer of the legal state of affairs under which regime the unconstitutional genocide has been implemented, and as to which the judiciary and legal profession has maintained a steadfast and willful blindness.

Since 1876 the raising of the unconstitutionality and resulting genocide disappear from the historical record in so far at least of the judges and lawyers' role of implementing it. That is, it disappeared until 1973 when I raised the issue of indigenous sovereignty and the corresponding unconstitutional genocide resulting from ignoring it.

But each time I raised it the issue was ignored: simply not mentioned by any of the courts in which I raised it; until in 1999 I was disbarred for criminal contempt of court for having raised an issue that 'hectored' and scandalized the judiciary, on the false ground that every judge before whom I had raised the issue carefully and patiently had addressed the issue and the law identified in relation to it. If true, there would be a record of the judicial decisions in which that supposedly occurred. No such record exists. The issue was ignored and I was silenced on the false ground that it had been addressed.

Canada has moved on from the starvation identified by Daschuk. The mode of genocide today is no longer the direct 'killing' that is indicted by article 2(a) of the Convention for the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. The form of genocide identified by my sovereigntist clients as ongoing is the 'serious bodily and mental harm' indicted by article 2(b) of the convention. The entrenched injustice of living under a system of justice that ignores the constitutional democracy under the rule of law causes angst and despair unto death as mirrored by the statistics..."

Also included in 'Ongoing Genocide Caused By Judicial Suppression of the 'Existing' Aboriginal Rights'. Clark (2018)

JKR

Pondering wrote:

JKR wrote:

Pondering wrote:

They are more vulnerable because their communities were destroyed by systematic poor treatment for generations. The residential school system destroyed families and communties. A community with no young is a community with no future. Now entire communities are dysfunctional and hopeless. This has led to violence and abuse within the community.

I think this description is too bleak. I have been to a couple of Reserves that are generally considered to be “impoverished” and faced with a lot of social challenges but I think that is just a small part of what those First Nations are about. On the Reserves I have been to I found that there was a lot of happiness, joy, and community spirit, at least as much as I have found in other parts of Canada. On those Reserves I also found that families were often closer knit than elsewhere. I also found that the people living on those Reserves were multi-faceted with all sorts of different interests and exceptional and inspiring insights and abilities.

That some people on some reserves are doing better doesn't help the missing and murdered women nor the children removed from their families. As a whole the indigenous population is considerably worse off than the rest of us. 

I think it’s obvious to everyone here on Babble that the situation for Canada’s First Nations population must be drastically improved.

NDPP

The Political Quagmire of the Prime Minister Accepting His Country's Complicity in Genocide

https://www.cbc.ca/news/opinion/genocide-mmiwig-1.5164014

"...Indeed, Trudeau's acceptance that Canada is a genocidal nation inevitably weakens our moral authority when lecturing the Chinese about gender equity or the US vice-president about abortion access. One could make the case that we never had the moral authority to begin with, since Canada's treatment of Indigenous people doesn't suddenly become worse because it has a new name. But a label does change the perception of Canada in the eyes of other nations, especially when the Canadian prime minister confirms the label is accurate."

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Also from that article: 

Quote:
Genocide is a legal term — a crime — which, according to the United Nations Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide, shall be tried "by a competent tribunal of the State in the territory of which the act was committed." Countries that have ratified the genocide convention, which include Canada, are obliged to both prevent and punish the perpetrators of genocide.

This means that if Trudeau is serious when he says "this was genocide," legal proceedings will be forthcoming (the implications of which, needless to say, would be enormous). If they are not, which is the infinitely more likely course, Trudeau sends a message about how serious he is when he calls the treatment of Indigenous Peoples "genocide." This is the quagmire in which the prime minister now finds himself.

So basically, if genocide trials are forthcoming then he was serious.  If no trials are forthcoming, he was virtue signalling.

Meanwhile:

Quote:
The Organization of American States wants Canada to agree to the creation of a panel to probe the allegation of genocide against Indigenous women and girls that was made in the final report of the inquiry into Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls (MMIWG).

I can't recall whether the OAS has been discredited around here, but I'm betting that if they say "hell ya, it was GENOCIDE!!" they'll be back in babblers' good books.

Unionist

Mr. Magoo wrote:

I can't recall whether the OAS has been discredited around here, but I'm betting that if they say "hell ya, it was GENOCIDE!!" they'll be back in babblers' good books.

Disappointed to see that you don't consider yourself as one of us babblers.

When I lobbied for your return, I hoped that after a decent transition, we could at least pretend to be on the same side of the oppression fence. But if you're just expressing frustration with what you see as mindless consensus on the part of us babblers, no worries. You have my personal guarantee that the lot of us will never agree on everything. 

WWWTT

NDPP wrote:

Bruce Clark: Immunity From Prosecution For Genocide

https://dissidentvoice.org/author/bruceclark/

"...As Daschuk did his Ph.D on the historical fact of genocide in Canada, I did mine on the constitutional history of precisely how the genocide was implemented specifically by the [politicians,] judges and lawyers of the country. At all material times since 1876 the Attorney General has been the architect and implementer of the legal state of affairs under which regime the unconstitutional genocide has been implemented, and as to which the judiciary and legal profession has maintained a steadfast and willful blindness.

Since 1876 the raising of the unconstitutionality and resulting genocide disappear from the historical record in so far at least of the judges and lawyers' role of implementing it. That is, it disappeared until 1973 when I raised the issue of indigenous sovereignty and the corresponding unconstitutional genocide resulting from ignoring it.

But each time I raised it the issue was ignored: simply not mentioned by any of the courts in which I raised it; until in 1999 I was disbarred for criminal contempt of court for having raised an issue that 'hectored' and scandalized the judiciary, on the false ground that every judge before whom I had raised the issue carefully and patiently had addressed the issue and the law identified in relation to it. If true, there would be a record of the judicial decisions in which that supposedly occurred. No such record exists. The issue was ignored and I was silenced on the false ground that it had been addressed.

Canada has moved on from the starvation identified by Daschuk. The mode of genocide today is no longer the direct 'killing' that is indicted by article 2(a) of the Convention for the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. The form of genocide identified by my sovereigntist clients as ongoing is the 'serious bodily and mental harm' indicted by article 2(b) of the convention. The entrenched injustice of living under a system of justice that ignores the constitutional democracy under the rule of law causes angst and despair unto death as mirrored by the statistics..."

Also included in 'Ongoing Genocide Caused By Judicial Suppression of the 'Existing' Aboriginal Rights'. Clark (2018)

Thanks for post!

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Unionist wrote:

Oh FFS krop, stop diverting. You made a mistake. You said, "Outside of Quebec the highest percentage of people who report French as their mother tongue is in the Yukon with 4.6%." In fact, your own source shows that 32% of New Brunswickers reported French as their "mother tongue". How about saying: "Sorry, I was wrong, typing too fast, whatever, but I maintain my principal points, which are as follows..." You made a mistake. I corrected it. You're welcome.

Sorry Unionist I made a mistake.

I wonder how many of those 32% also speak Chiac. Here is a picture of my favourite beach, where many people speak Chiac.

 

 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

The main issue with the ongoing genocide is the theft of indigenous lands and resources for uses that the rightful owners do not want. Here is what is happening in NB. It is another slap in the face to indigenous rights. NB is largely unceded land that the Crown has already acknowledged as the territory of the Miꞌkmaq , when it signed its peace treaties with them in .

Without respect there can be no reconciliation and this is not respect. Pandering to our oil and gas oligarchy is far more important than letting First Nations communities become empowered.

A statement from the chiefs of Mi’gmawe’l Tplu’taqnn Inc. (MTI) says they “were blindsided by the decision,” which was made without “consent, consultation or input” from Indigenous groups in the province.

The statement cites the 2016 final report from the New Brunswick Commission on Hydraulic Fracturing that set out nation-to-nation consultation as a prerequisite to lifting the moratorium.

“The premier must remember the Crown has a duty to consult and to seek our consent to development in our territory. The Mi’gmaq should’ve been engaged on this issue when the government was just considering lifting the moratorium in the Sussex area,” Chief George Ginnish of Natoaganeg First Nation said in the release.

https://globalnews.ca/news/5356115/indigenous-chiefs-issue-warning-gas-f...

NDPP

Romeo Dallaire Denies Canadian Genocide and Distorts Rwanda's

https://dissidentvoice.org/2019/06/romeo-dallaire-denies-canadian-genoci...

"Is Romeo Dallaire a genocide denier...?"

NDPP

What Happened To Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women Was Horrific But It Wasn't Genocide

https://nationalpost.com/opinion/what-happened-to-missing-and-murdered-i...

"The report claims its use of the term is in keeping with the UN Convention on the Prevention and Punishment of the Crime of Genocide. It's not." - Hymie Rubenstein - 

More Hymie Rubenstein:

 Debunking the Half-Truths and Exaggerations in the Truth & Reconciliation Report (2015) 

"When we call all aboriginal children educated in residential schools 'survivors' this erroneously implies they are equivalent to Holocaust survivors. This libel also denigrates the sacrifices made by the many caring Christian teachers, religious leaders and other such personnel who devoted years of service trying to enhance the life chances of their young charges..." (National Post, 2015)

All becomes clear.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Methinks this is the same Hymie Rubenstein.

It seems he won his court case and the bank had to give him his money back even though the sums were seized by the Crown acting under and pursuant to the provisions of the Proceeds of Crime and Money Laundering (Prevention) Act No. 39 of 2001 of the Laws of Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.

https://www.eccourts.org/dr-hymie-rubenstein-v-safe-harbour-bank-ltd/

I base that conclusion strickly on the fact that he has a former connection to Saint Vincent and the Grenadines.

https://journals.sagepub.com/doi/abs/10.1177/002204260003000301

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

This canoe ceremony highlights the link between the protection of land and women. I have also posted a link to one her videos. She is a very powerful voice and her words need to be heeded.

Ta'kaiya Blaney stepped into a canoe sitting on the steps of Vancouver's Convention Centre, before a group of men lifted her on their shoulders and carried her down the waterfront, as Sḵwx̱wú7mesh (Squamish) singers and council members led the way.

The singer and advocate from the ɬaʔəmen ​​​​​(Tla'amin) First Nation was being honoured in a canoe procession. Arriving at three longhouses set up in Harbour Green Park in the city's downtown, Blaney addressed the crowd that had followed.

She said Justin Trudeau’s support for pipelines speaks louder than his support for gender equality.

“It’s not enough to take a look at the problem that we have across Indian Country with our relatives disappearing, and in the same breath, be approving pipelines that invite that violence into our lands,” said Blaney, held high above the crowd.

...

But for Blaney, an environmental advocate since she was 10 years old, protecting the environment and protecting Indigenous women are inextricably connected. She called on the government to take action to end violence against women as well as land exploitation.

“We know, as a fact, that when you bring pipelines into Indigenous lands our relatives go missing. The man camps that are brought in, they are warfare against Indigenous women," she said.

Energy projects like oil and gas pipelines attract more than four men for every woman working in the industry, according to Statistics Canada. Communities have expressed concern and fear of work camps associated with higher rates of sexual assault and violence against Indigenous women.

https://www.nationalobserver.com/2019/06/04/features/canoe-ceremony-high...

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=emMJmKIdyRY

NDPP

"In Canada they lacked the military strength but had a bureaucracy and missionaries, so the practice became, 'The only good Indian is a white Indian.'

https://twitter.com/1Mohawklawyer/status/1137497346126884864

"Our objective is to continue until there is not a single Indian that has not been absorbed into the body politic of Canada and there is no more Indian question. That is the whole purpose of our legislation..." - Indian Affairs, 1921 - 

NDPP

'Killing the Indian in the Child'

https://youtu.be/vUVwLeY63Mw

Tamara Starblanket on Genocide.

Pondering

Has any progress been made on the Truth and Reconciliation report?

https://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/mmiwgs-findings-on-man-camps-are-a-good-place-for-government-to-get-started/

“There is substantial evidence,” the final report says, “of a serious problem that requires focused attention on the relationship between resource extraction projects and violence against Indigenous women.” The impacts on women and girls, the report explains, has never been a part of the decision-making process when it comes to deciding the fate of projects in northern B.C., particularly around the city of Fort St. John. “Moreover, even though most companies have sexual harassment policies,” the report says. “It is not clear that these policies are being consistently implemented in a meaningful way.”....

The final report offered five recommendations on what is fast becoming a flashpoint issue in areas where resource extraction projects are under way. One calls for all industries to consider the safety and security of Indigenous women, while ensuring “their equitable benefit from development, at all stages of project planning, assessment, implementation, management, and monitoring.” Another calls on governments and “bodies mandated to evaluate, approve, and/or monitor development projects” to develop and monitor a gender-based analysis throughout the entire life of a project. A third recommendation calls for all impact-benefit agreements to include provisions addressing the impact the project will have on Indigenous women and girls....

There’s a fourth recommendation that could have major implications for Manitoba. It calls on federal, provincial and territorial governments to fund more inquiries into the relationship between resource extraction and violence against Indigenous women. Without going into detail, the report says: “At a minimum, we support the call of Indigenous women and leaders for a public inquiry into the sexual violence and racism at hydroelectric projects in northern Manitoba.” Though vague, the statement refers to a report released last year by a provincial agency in Manitoba detailing the sexual abuse and rape of Indigenous women at the hands of Manitoba Hydro workers in the 1960s near the northern town of Gillam. It sparked a nationwide conversation about the looming threat of so-called “man camps”—especially those that will eventually dot the route of the Trans Mountain expansion if and when shovels hit the earth.

We don't need more studies. We need to restrict men in man camps to the camps. No blowing off steam in local communities. Add a per head surcharge with the funds given to local women's groups. 

NDPP

"Breaking Video: Illegal construction of TransMountain man camp in Valemont BC, unceded Secwepemc Territory. Canada, Justin Trudeau, you are continuing the Genocide by building man camps when Secwepemc have said NO! #NoManCamps "

https://twitter.com/KanahusFreedom/status/1137418463692165122

Art Manuel's daughter continues the fight against settler colonialism and usurpation-as-genocide. No jurisdiction - no consent - no mancamps/pipelines.

swallow swallow's picture

Not much progress on the TRC report by government though some of the non-government groups have tried to follow the recommendations. CBC Indigenous reports that 10/94 calls to action are implemented, mostly by non-gov actors.

https://newsinteractives.cbc.ca/longform-single/beyond-94

 

Pondering

Kropotkin you are right. It is genocide. 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Pondering wrote:

We don't need more studies. We need to restrict men in man camps to the camps. No blowing off steam in local communities. Add a per head surcharge with the funds given to local women's groups. 

Wow that is a quick descent into slavery.  Do they get to quit or do they hve to stay locked up until the job is complete?

swallow swallow's picture

That could be up to the local Nation to decide, maybe.

Today, in a new low, the Toronto Star ran a poll asing readers if Canada had committed genocide or not - as if this was a matter of cute online voting and not fact. They've taken it down after protests. Canadian mainstream media has been appalling on this. 

Best piece in mainsteam media so far is printed in a publication outside Canada: https://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/2019/06/11/canada-grapples-with-charge-genocide-indigenous-people-theres-no-debate/?utm_term=.9e2dab7c1b20

Pondering

Thanks Swallow, that was a good read. Trudeau stated he would follow the recommendations of the Truth and Reconcilliation report but all he offers is virtue signaling. 

NDPP

Canada's Treatment of Indigenous Peoples Fits the Definition of 'Genocide': Canadian Lawyer Mag

https://t.co/9vdm7Rf0rY

"Some people believe the earth is flat..."

cco

Pondering wrote:

We need to restrict men in man camps to the camps. No blowing off steam in local communities. Add a per head surcharge with the funds given to local women's groups. 


kropotkin1951 wrote:

Wow that is a quick descent into slavery.  Do they get to quit or do they hve to stay locked up until the job is complete?


swallow wrote:

That could be up to the local Nation to decide, maybe.

Something that will never cease to amaze me is the ability of some of my fellow leftists to reinvent from first principles a horrifying idea that leftists have fought against and slap a progressive label on it. Here we have indentured servitude, apartheid, and gender segregation rolled into one, just like the Gulf states – and under the same justification of keeping people safe. Not that we're prejudiced against people in the camps, you know, but they are man camps, full of riffraff. They're bringing drugs. They're bringing crime. They're rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.

Pondering

cco wrote:
Pondering wrote:

We need to restrict men in man camps to the camps. No blowing off steam in local communities. Add a per head surcharge with the funds given to local women's groups. 

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Wow that is a quick descent into slavery.  Do they get to quit or do they hve to stay locked up until the job is complete?

swallow wrote:

That could be up to the local Nation to decide, maybe.

Something that will never cease to amaze me is the ability of some of my fellow leftists to reinvent from first principles a horrifying idea that leftists have fought against and slap a progressive label on it. Here we have indentured servitude, apartheid, and gender segregation rolled into one, just like the Gulf states – and under the same justification of keeping people safe. Not that we're prejudiced against people in the camps, you know, but they are man camps, full of riffraff. They're bringing drugs. They're bringing crime. They're rapists. And some, I assume, are good people.

They are called man camps because they are already segregated. Workers go on ships for months at a time. That doesn't make them slaves and ships are not prisons. Make staying on site a condition of employment. Men can choose whether or not they want these extremely well-paying jobs. 

https://www.macleans.ca/news/canada/mmiwgs-findings-on-man-camps-are-a-good-place-for-government-to-get-started/

The chapter in the report, regarded as a “deeper dive” into a particular issue facing Indigenous women and girls, as well as 2SLGBTQQIA people, describes the connection between an influx of transient workers—those who arrive in mostly isolated towns and cities from elsewhere to work in mines or industries like oil, gas or hydro—and higher rates of sexual assault, harassment, STIs and women entering the sex trade. It points to rampant drug and alcohol abuse among workers housed in camps, compounded by long hours, above average pay and a tendency to “blow off steam.” Resource projects in Canada routinely draw workers from across the country and around the world. This reality, the inquiry found, leads to a mostly male workforce that typically has no connection to the people or place.

Your comparisons have no merit. 

It is not indentured servitude. They can quit their job and go to town. It's a condition of employment. It is not gender segregation as they are free to leave, go back to their homes and communities. It certainly isn't apartheid. 

The men have no connection to the communities. The community experiences it as an invasion of men. A better comparison would be communities that want to limit tourism as self-protection. 

If those same men want to move to town; buy or rent a place, or stay in the hotel if it has one they can do so. Then they are a resident. 

Violence is overwhelmingly committed by men and against men as well as women. Sexual crimes are overwhelmingly committed by men. As a woman I believe the increasingly graphic violence in general entertainment and pornography contributes to male violence. 

Women's liberation depended on women themselves rejecting not only roles but much of what we were taught was feminine. We had to reject privileges not just limitations. We had to change what we valued ourselves for. There are still women who would love to go back to the days when the man brought home the bacon. 

I think men are changing however the continued popularity of porn and graphic violence illustrates not enough. Understand I am not promoting censureship. I am saying that men's liberation, like women's liberation, requires collectively changing mindset.

Liking extreme porn and graphic violence are not something men are born to enjoy. Some women enjoy them too.  It isn't gender specific. It is social conditioning and choice. Men can choose to reject these masculine archetypes but it is up to men just as it has been up to women to reject feminine archetypes. 

It is valid for communities to fear invasions of men because statistically any place a large group of men is placed that isn't their home communities suffer. 

swallow swallow's picture

I am so sorry that I contributed to this tangent, which disrespects the people discussed in the report and the fact of genocide against Indigenous peoples. Murdered and missing Indigenous women, not men, should be centred in a thread on this report. I apologize for contributing to marginalization of Indigenous people on this thread by my comment. 

cco

I also apologize for my contribution to the thread drift.

voice of the damned

I've started a Man Camp thread in Labour And Consumption.

Pages