Unist'ot'en camp

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Unist'ot'en camp

ACTION ALERT - APPLICATION FOR INJUNCTION SERVED TO UNIST'OT'EN CAMP!

Coastal GasLink Pipeline LTD. has applied for an injunction and served us with notice for a civil lawsuit, seeking to kick us off our lands and to bankrupt us. They are seeking an "interim, interlocutory or permanent injunction" and financial damages for "occupying, obstructing, blocking, physically impeding or delaying access" to our own unceded territory.

Instead of naming the Unist'ot'en and our chiefs, who collectively hold title and govern Unist'ot'en territory according to our Wet'suwet'en law, the applications personally name Freda Huson and Warner Naziel (Chief Smogelgem). We see this as an attempt to demobilize our resistance and bulldoze through our home.

These legal challenges ignore the jurisdiction and authority of our hereditary chiefs and our feast system of governance, which was recognized in the 1997 Deglamuukw-Gisday'wa court case. All Wet'suwet'en Clans have rejected the Coastal GasLink pipeline and stand behind us. We are weighing our options for a response to this threat.

We were served with this notice at Smogelgem's mothers house in Witset, while we are attending to her at in-home palliative care.

Issues Pages: 
Regions: 
epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Pipeline company files injunction application against individuals at northern B.C. camp

A Calgary-based energy company is turning to the courts to gain access to sites it says are part of a "critical path" in constructing a natural gas pipeline in northern B.C.

The issue for Coastal GasLink is that a First Nations group and its supporters are preventing the company from accessing a bridge and roadway that it says it needs to use for construction activities.

The Unist'ot'en camp, located 66 km down a forest service road, south of Houston, B.C., halfway between Prince George and Prince Rupert, started in 2009.

Coastal GasLink states in its Nov. 26 court filing that if the restricted access continues, "the project cannot proceed."

"There is no work-around for construction through this area," the court filing states.

The Coastal GasLink pipeline is part of a $40 billion liquified natural gas project that includes the LNG Canada processing plant in Kitimat. LNG Canada announced it was going ahead with the project last month....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Hereditary Chiefs of the Wet’suwet’en Nation in B.C. say LNG pipeline doesn’t have unanimous consent

The Unist’ot’en Healing Centre stands among the tall trees more than two hours drive southeast of Smithers, B.C.

An impressive three-storey complex surrounded by outbuildings.

“It’s a healing facility – not a protest camp,” said spokeswoman Freda Huson, who lives here with her husband and hereditary Chief Smogelgem (Warner Naziel).

A healing centre that just happens to be in the path of the Coastal GasLink Pipeline that will carry liquefied natural gas from northeastern B.C. to tanker ships waiting at the Port of Kitimat to sail to Asian markets.

When LNG Canada announced the $40-billion pipeline approval in October, it said it had unanimous support from all northern B.C. First Nations.

But the hereditary chiefs of the Wet’suwet’en Nation are opposed – even though their elected band council has endorsed the project.

“We don’t want their money,” said Chief Namoks (John Ridsdale).

“We’ve stripped the names from three female hereditary chiefs for supporting the pipeline. A name is more important than money.”

Ridsdale speaks for one of five clans that comprise the nation comprised of 22,000 square kilometres of territory between Burns Lake and Kitimat.

It’s a stunning terrain, dotted with snow-capped mountains and pristine waterways.

Ridsdale and the other chiefs, wearing traditional regalia, are showing their support today.

They must pledge to respect the centre’s ways before being allowed to pass a high wooden gate studded with barbed wire.

They then sit down to a lunch of fish caught in the Morice River just steps from the front door.

They meet two male band members here to detox from substance abuse.

“Once people are strong they want to reconnect to the land and protect the territory,” said Huson, who has lived here for 10 years.

“You can’t stand up if you’re oppressed; people come here to get decolonized.”

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

We Pledge to Stand with Unist'ot'en

The Unist’ot’en camp, a permanent Indigenous re-occupation of Wet’suwet’en land in northern B.C., is currently on high alert. Coastal GasLink Pipeline has applied for an injunction, as well as served notice for a civil lawsuit to claim financial damages for “occupying, obstructing, blocking, physically impeding or delaying access” against Unist’ot’en camp on their own unceded territory. Instead of recognizing the collective hereditary leadership of the Wet'suwet'en, the legal notices target two individuals Freda Huson and Warner Naziel.

Coastal Gaslink's application for an injunction will be heard on Monday December 10. Let Unist'ot'en Camp know they are not alone.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
TAKE THE PLEDGE
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

1. WE COMMEND the courage and vision of Unist’ot’en Camp.

2. WE ARE WATCHING across the province, country and internationally.

3. WE DENOUNCE any attempt by Coastal GasLink Pipeline, federal government, provincial government or RCMP to interfere in the rights of the Unist’ot’en to occupy, manage or maintain their lands.

4. WE DEMAND that any and all actions taken by the federal and provincial government, industry, and policing agencies must be consistent with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and Anuk Nu'at'en (Wet'suwet'en laws) and collective Title.

5. WE PLEDGE support to the frontline land defenders of Unist’ot’en Camp and affirm the collective hereditary governance of the Wet'suwet'en who are enforcing Wet'suwet'en laws on their unceded lands.

quote:

Initial List of Signatories

ORGANIZATIONS:

350 dot org
Alliance Against Displacement
Alliance for People's Health
BROKE (Burnaby Residents Opposing Kinder Morgan Expansion)
Canada Philippines Solidarity for Human Rights
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives BC Office
Civil Liberties Defense Center
Coalition of South Asian Women Against Violence
Community Action Bus
Council of Canadians
Dogwood BC
East Indian Defence Committee
FANG Collective
Gabriela BC
Greenpeace Canada
Idle No More
Indigenous Health Curriculum Action Group, McMaster Medical School
Indigenous Land Defense Across Borders
International League of Peoples Struggle
Island Solidarity
L'eau Est la Vie
Liberation Health Collective
Migrant Workers Alliance for Change
Mining Injustice Solidarity Network
Mining Justice Action Committee
No Mas Muertas/No More Deaths
No More Silence
No One Is Illegal – Vancouver
Ontario Coalition Against Poverty
Raise the Rates BC
Retail Action Network
Rising Tide Toronto
Sanctuary Health
Secwepemc Women Warriors
SFU Institute for the Humanities
Sierra Club BC
Simon Fraser Public Interest Research Group (SFPIRG)
Skeena Watershed Conservation Coalition
Social Coast
Social Justice Studies, University of Victoria
Solidarity Halifax
Stand dot earth
Streams of Justice
Sum Of Us
Teaching Support Staff Union Executive
The Leap
The Red Nation
Tiny House Warriors
Toronto Overdose Prevention Society
Trikone Vancouver
Unist'ot'en Solidarity Brigade
Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users
Vancouver Tenants Union
Western Aboriginal Harm Reduction Society
Wilderness Committee

INDIVIDUALS:

Alicia Elliott, Writer
Ashley Bomberry , Film and Theatre Artist
Aylan Couchie, Artist and Writer
Bill McKibben, co-founder of 350 dot org
Brandon Rhéal Amyot, Activist and Pride Organizer
Clayton Thomas-Muller, Indigenous Climate Campaigner
Councillor Rev. Christine Boyle, Vancouver City Councillor
Desmond Cole, Author
Genevieve Fuji Johnson, Professor, Department of Political Science, SFU
Dr. Glen Coulthard (Yellowknives Dene), Assistant Professor, UBC
Harsha Walia, Author
Dr. Hayden King, Executive Director, Yellowhead Institute
Howard Breen, Organizer, Extinction Rebellion
Helen Knott, Author
Councillor Jean Swanson, Vancouver City Councillor
Jesse Piedfort, Director - Sierra Club Washington State Chapter
Judy Rebick, Writer
Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Author
Councillor Keenan Aylwin, Barrie City Councillor
Dr. Margaret McGregor
Maude Barlow, Author
Melina Laboucan-Massimo (Lubicon Cree), David Suzuki Fellow
Micheal D. Sawyer, Environmental Consultant
Migizi Bebaayaa, Artist
Naomi Klein, Author
Nick Estes (Kul Wicasa Oyate), Assistant Professor, University of the New Mexico
Dr. Pam Palmater, Ryerson Chair in Indigenous Governance
Councillor Pete Fry, Vancouver City Councillor, Green Party
Raven Davis, Artist and Community Educator
Robyn Maynard, Author
Russ Diabo, Spokesperson for Defenders of the Land
Dr. Sarah Hunt (Kwakwaka’wakw), Assistant Professor, UBC
Shad Kabango, Artist
Dr. Shiri Pasternak, Research Director, Yellowhead Institute

Martin N.

A few malcontents with no standing are attemting to subvert their own nation's position on Coastal Gas link. Let the Courts figure it out.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Martin N. wrote:
A few malcontents with no standing are attemting to subvert their own nation's position on Coastal Gas link. Let the Courts figure it out.

Yes the courts will sort it out. How they will decide is an interesting topic. Your insulting attitude to hereditary chiefs and traditional indigenous governance systems is duly noted. Fortunately the courts understand the concept of hereditary chiefs and Indian Act band councilors. In the meantime if you could keep your not very subtle racism to a dull roar I know I would appreciate it.

“When you hear they have 100 per cent support from First Nations along this proposed pipeline route, those are elected bands and not one pipeline goes through those reserves where elected officials have jurisdiction,” Chief Na’Moks, hereditary chief of the Wet’suwet’en Tsayu Clan, told APTN in a phone interview.

“The territory itself—the jurisdiction there—belongs to the people and the hereditary chiefs and the names that we carry.”

The hereditary chiefs may have a strong case if they end up in court, according to Métis lawyer Bruce McIvor, who runs First Peoples Law in Vancouver.

“This is one of the huge outstanding issues now in Aboriginal law: who gets to speak for the Indigenous people? It’s one of the most difficult, thorny things to unravel as part of decolonization,” McIvor said.

“We have hundreds of Indian Act bands across the country and a lot of the time those bands may not align with the traditional governance [systems].”

The Wet’suwet’en, he explained, “have a very complicated governance system” compared to other Indigenous peoples.

“They have their various clans and houses and they’re quite numerous. And they don’t necessarily align with the Indian Act governance system.”

McIvor said the Unist’ot’en’s case is strengthened by the Supreme Court of Canada’s 1997 Delgamuukw decision.

https://aptnnews.ca/2018/12/03/government-document-calls-unistoten-leade...

Martin N.

Gee, dropping the racism card right off the hop, huh. Maybe you should look up 'malcontent' before getting your knickers in too tight a knot. Are you suggesting that indigenous people cant be malcontents?

The Wet'suwet'en can look after themselves just fine and, if there is anything they loath more than racists, its condescending white camp followers speaking for them.

The white eco types are the first to glom on to any indigenous protest as cover for their own agendas which may also not be aligned with indigenous goals and then proceed to take all the oxygen for themselves.

Indigenous peoples have to sort out who speaks for whom for themselves, likely with the assistance of the courts. What is not required is white camp followers hijacking the process for their own ends.

Just because a dozen malcontents endorse an extreme position does not give them any standing. Neither do you speaking for hereditary chiefs, thank you.

NDPP

"Since my traditional government never agreed by any treaty to be governed by your government, why does your legal system apply your government's laws to me on my indigenous nation's unceded national territory?"

An Identification of the Conflicted Relationship Between the Indigenous Nations and the Legal Profession in North America

https://dissidentvoice.org/author/bruceclark/

From the new book: 'Ongoing Genocide Caused by Judicial Suppression of the 'Existing' Aboriginal Rights'.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Martin N. wrote:
Gee, dropping the racism card right off the hop, huh. Maybe you should look up 'malcontent' before getting your knickers in too tight a knot. Are you suggesting that indigenous people cant be malcontents?

I am saying that for a self proclaimed expert on the oil and gas industry to call hereditary chiefs "malcontents" is totally denying them any agency over their traditional territories and indeed is racist.

It consider it my duty as a white settler to call other asshole settlers like you on their racism.

Martin N.

How many babblers identify as indigenous? How many former indigenous babblers have quit babble because of sanctimonious white 'settlers' preaching at them rather than listening?

Isn't it rather condescending and presumptuous of you to assume a 'duty' upon yourself to claim I am an 'asshole settler' ie: white based solely on my opinions?

You arrogantly assume that indigenous peoples are monolithic in clinging to the opinions and values YOU espouse rather than the FACT that indigenous peoples hold opinions and values just as divergent as the rest of society.

It is white condescending camp followers like you who consider it their 'duty' to stick their long white noses into indigenous affairs and drown out indigenous voices that are the problem. In FACT, you and your fellow travellers are as big a hinderance as the colonialist 'Indian Affairs Act' and its devotees in Ottawa. The Ottawa mandarins create havoc to 'kick the can down the road' and you white campfollowers confuse the issues with your incessant preaching.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..from democracy now headlines

Indigenous Activists in Canada Block Construction of Major Pipeline

And in Canada, indigenous activists have been physically blocking the construction of the largest fracking project in the country’s history. Members of the Unist’ot’en Clan stopped TransCanada Corporation workers from entering their territory on November 20. The land, on the western coast of Canada is in the path of the planned $4.7 billion Coastal GasLink pipeline. Last week, TransCanada applied for an injunction against the indigenous community in an attempt to gain access to the land. This is Freda Huson, a spokesperson for the camp.

Freda Huson: “The project is going to impact our waters, our salmon, our berries, our medicines. And everything that is our critical infrastructure is at risk. … If the court grants them that injunction, that gives the police the right to try and come in and do a raid and take us down, which would—they would try to take us out of our own home, which we haven’t committed no crime. We’re just living on our land. … We’ve never ceded or surrendered our land. We’ve never lost it through treaty or any other means. And we’ve never given up our decision-making power to any outside entities.”

Martin N.

The issue before the courts is simply that they are blocking a provincial bridge.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Leaders of Unist'ot'en Community were protecting their territory. TransCanada took them to court

quote:

The notice of civil claim was served to Huson and Naziel while they were at Naziel's mother's house. They were attending to Naziel's sick mother at the time, as they continue to do, while suddenly faced with trying to deal with the legal actions. Naziel and Huson, based on past experiences, believe the company chose to serve the injunction in difficult times.

"They chose the injunction while I'm doing palliative care with my mom," Naziel said. "It's advantageous for them to jump on us while we're struggling. This isn't the first time — they sent surveyors with helicopters while Freda's dad passed and Enbridge tried to cross during her brother's passing."

Due to the circumstances, Naziel and Huson requested an extension for response to the injunction. But they were informed on Tuesday that TransCanada denied the request.

TransCanada is also the company behind the proposed Keystone XL oil pipeline that, if built, would link Alberta oilsands producers to refineries and export markets on the Gulf coast of Texas. This project has recently stalled following a federal court order in November that was triggered by legal action by Indigenous and environmental groups in the United States.

'We live our laws every day'

The B.C. Ministry of Energy, Mines and Petroleum said in an email that they are aware that Coastal GasLink filed for an injunction and they acknowledge the challenging situation.

"We hope a respectful resolution can be achieved," wrote Minister Michelle Mungall. "We will assist in re-engagement efforts and we are looking to the company to find a resolution to the access issue. For our part, the province recognizes the need to reset the relationship with the Wet’suwet’en Nation, including hereditary leadership. Our reconciliation commitment isn’t connected to any one project and is grounded in rights recognition."

B.C. and Canada approved TransCanada's Coastal Gaslink fracked gas pipeline on Oct. 2, 2018. While Coastal GasLink has negotiated agreements with the elected councils of all 20 First Nations on the route, the Wet'suwet'en hereditary chieftainship says they are the only authority that can legally sanction development in their territories.

"We are the jurisdiction in our land," Dinï ze’ Na’Moks (hereditary chief John Ridsdale) told National Observer over the phone. "We never signed a treaty with Canada. As hereditary chiefs, we are unified, and our answer has always been — no pipelines."

The notice of civil claim is just the latest in a long history of the Wet'suwet'en people practicing, asserting and defending their traditional territories, culture and governance system.

In 1997, the Wet'suwet'en celebrated a victory in the Supreme Court of Canada in a groundbreaking case known as 'Delgamuukw v. British Columbia.' The court affirmed that the Wet'suwet'en have never ceded or surrendered their title to 22,000 square kilometers of land in northern B.C. In the decision, the courts recognized the hereditary chiefs as the rightful decision-makers on their lands.

Martin N.

epaulo, you are just another manifestation of colonialist oppressors using the indigenous peoples' fight for a decent resolution to their concerns to advance your own agenda.

This 'pipeline' stance is simply indigenous peoples fighting against government oppression via the Indian Act using the meager means at their disposal. You and your fellow traveller parasites dilute indigenous peoples' power by making the struggle about YOU and your concerns.

Keep your long white nose out of indigenous affairs.

NDPP

LOL. Having reduced sovereign indigenous nations beyond the treaty frontier to illegally occupied vichy administrations wholly subservient to Canada and a stacked-deck, fixed game, Hannibal Lector and his friends then demand allies keep out and leave it to the usurping white legal system on behalf of corporate colonialist resource extractors and Canadian judges and lawyers to 'sort it out.' 

The perfect crime.

NDPP

Unist'ot'en Camp Staying Put as Company Puts On Pressure to Step Aside (and vid)

https://aptnnews.ca/2018/12/04/unistoten-camp-staying-put-as-company-put...

"It's the Unist'ot'en clans re-occupation of Wet'suwe'ten traditional lands."

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Martin N. wrote:
You arrogantly assume that indigenous peoples are monolithic in clinging to the opinions and values YOU espouse rather than the FACT that indigenous peoples hold opinions and values just as divergent as the rest of society.

This is a classic strawman argument. Go fuck yourself if after all the years I've posted here you want to claim that I think indigenous cultures are all the same.  You are  corporate sycophant, in other words a fascist who believes that the oiligarchy should be able to ignore UNDRIP and the traditional chiefs.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..more from #13 post

Leaders of Unist'ot'en Community were protecting their territory. TransCanada took them to court

quote:

"We live our laws everyday," Ridsdale, hereditary chief of the Tsayu clan said. "That's why we have 22,000 square kilometers of unceded territory. We have custodian on the territory, according to our laws and our ways. We have always stuck to our hereditary system of governance."

One of the main differences between Canadian law, and the way it negotiates extractive projects, the economy and the benefit of its members, from the way that the Wet'suwet'en system of governance represents relationships in their traditional territories, has to do with money, the chief said.

"We don't put a monetary value on our land, culture, future," Ridsdale said. "We don't want anything more than what we have, but we want to keep what we have. What we have will last, if we look after our land, as hereditary chiefs."

Hereditary chiefs are obliged to care for their territories, he said. Chiefs are custodians with great responsibilities, put into position through consensus of the clan members. All of the names chiefs are given in their traditional feast system, come from the lands, air, water, animas, he said. These names, coveted and preserved over many generations, are older than Canada has been a country.

Dinï ze’ Smogelgem (Naziel) said Wet'suwet'en laws are natural laws that come with a set of responsibilities.

"When we receive a chief name, those names come with a blanket and those blankets represent our territories," Naziel said. "Our people say — don't dirty your blanket. If you don't uphold your names, you could be stripped of those names and the entire family shamed."

It's a huge responsibility to protect the names, the chief explained, as well as those territories they represent.

'None of these people have signed anything'

Senior Communications Specialist for Coastal GasLink, Jacquelynn Benson said the proponent felt that filing the application for the injunction order was necessary to access roads needed to begin construction activities. She said the injunction was the last resort.

"We have been initiating consultation with local communities, including elected chiefs and councils and hereditary chiefs, since June of 2012," Benson said over the phone. "A lot of that engagement has led to hereditary chiefs and First Nations groups participating in our field studies and committees to provide feedback on planning of the project."

Benson said the company does have hereditary support, though she was not able to name any names or explain agreements made through respecting traditional Wet'suwet'en governance. Naziel and Huson said that the company's comments were false.

"We have five hereditary chiefs," Huson said, taking the phone during the joint interview with her and her partner. "Four of our hereditary chiefs showed up to the Unist'ot'en camp last week in a show of solidarity. None of those people have signed anything with the government. If they're saying they have hereditary leadership, they might be talking about people posing as chiefs."

Huson said her people know who is who. The document citing the groundbreaking Delgamuukw case is available online, she said, naming 13 house groups. Nowhere in the document does it name elected band councils, she said, and nowhere have hereditary chiefs given away their rights and responsibilities to any other entities. In Wet'suwet'en governance, hereditary chiefs receive names through a feast and show of support.

"We had two feasts to tell our nations the reasons why we oppose these projects," Huson said. "The other chiefs stood up and supported our decision. That's our governance structure."

Huson said they aren't trying to kick the municipalities out, but are trying to work with them.

"What little we have, where we can still hunt, harvest, fish and trap, is threatened by these projects," Huson said.

quote:

When the government claims LNG is a cleaner energy source, they're wrong, Naziel and Huson stressed.

"They're using more carbon than they're saying they're replacing. The last reservoirs of LNG will run dry by 2020, so what's left? They're going to try and replace LNG (liquified natural gas) with LFG (liquified fracked gas), one of the most destructive processes they have for oil and gas around the world," Naziel said. "I trust in the public's intellectual ability to put an end to this."

Since the injunction, 65 organizations and over 1,500 individuals have pledged their support for the Unitst'ot'en community, "demanding that Coastal GasLink, the RCMP, and Federal and Provincial governments take no actions in violation of Wet'suwet'en collective Title and the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples." The injunction hearing will take place on Monday, Dec. 10, International Human Rights Day.

quizzical

Martin N. wrote:
epaulo, you are just another manifestation of colonialist oppressors using the indigenous peoples' fight for a decent resolution to their concerns to advance your own agenda. This 'pipeline' stance is simply indigenous peoples fighting against government oppression via the Indian Act using the meager means at their disposal. You and your fellow traveller parasites dilute indigenous peoples' power by making the struggle about YOU and your concerns. Keep your long white nose out of indigenous affairs.

going to wade my FN ass into your comment and say piss off.

my great great great...grandfather signed the first "Treaty" in Canada called the Peace and Friendship Treaty when two faced colonialists built a Fort, against the treaty, at today's Halifax he burnt it down and scalped settlers and military.

your words are no different from those he scalped. you drip condescension and think your words will divide allies, silence and conquer for the petroleum industry. 

live your little exploitive life in China and leave us out of your hate words thanks.

Martin N.

Is your great great great grandfather your only indigenous connection? You sound just like all the rest of the white parasites glomming onto tenuous indigenous connections to preach rather than listen.

What makes you assume I am white? Other than the fact that you white busybodies cannot stand the thought of a successful aboriginal capitalist that thinks for himself.

I have been here since before Audra was fired and its always the same with you condescending white wankers - you never listen and steal all the oxygen out of the room with your incessant white guilt trip - its always about YOU.

Thats why there are no aboriginals here - they can smell the progressive rat in the aboriginal woodpile.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

I did not assume anything about where you fall on the Pantone Skintone Guide. I am merely going by your words. Are you telling me that only white people can be racist against indigenous people? I do not claim any indigenous ancestry even though I have had indigenous people tell me I look like I do.  I of course know that I was not raised in an indigenous culture.  I have been studying aboriginal law in depth for over 25 years.  You claim to be knowledgeable so I can only conclude that your comments calling someone with a legally arguable claim to the unceded rights of his nation a malcontent is racism 101.

quizzical

Martin N. wrote:
Is your great great great grandfather your only indigenous connection? You sound just like all the rest of the white parasites glomming onto tenuous indigenous connections to preach rather than listen. What makes you assume I am white? Other than the fact that you white busybodies cannot stand the thought of a successful aboriginal capitalist that thinks for himself. I have been here since before Audra was fired and its always the same with you condescending white wankers - you never listen and steal all the oxygen out of the room with your incessant white guilt trip - its always about YOU. Thats why there are no aboriginals here - they can smell the progressive rat in the aboriginal woodpile.

not like i owe you a fucking thing but my gma is full blood and lives on our deeded land given to our family after the great expulsion. land which already belonged to us of course. 

and you can fk off disparaging my family their story should be mandatory history in schools as they were the first to suffer colonizers and fought back.

 

 

 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Yes quizzical your ancestors and mine share a history that goes back nearly 400 years. My first maternal ancestor to settle from the Lowlands in Europe arrived in Port Royal in 1626.  If one studies that history they find that the divide and conquer logic that MartinN is lauding while denouncing the hereditary Chiefs is as old as British North America.

Some First Nations in what is now Maine and the Maritimes supported the British and some supported the French and some tried to stay out of the wars. The Acadians at that point in the 1750's were trying to follow their 100 year old tradition of accepting the laws of whichever Empire claimed their homeland while remaining neutral and not subject to conscription by either the French or English. They certainly never asked for one of that eras major military installations to be constructed on their doorstep. When the scalping laws where introduced the Acadians also protested to the British Governors because as far as the Bostonians were concerned both of our ancestors around the bay were fair "game."

I will continue to stand with indigenous peoples who ask for my support as the Chiefs at this camp have done.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

I thought maybe I needed to quote some historians so here is something from one of the leading indigenous historian's website.

By 1713, the year France transferred its self-endowed ownership of Acadia to the English via the Treaty of Utrecht, the Mi'kmaq/Acadien relationship was so close that it caused the British to become paranoid about it. In fact, their paranoia was so bad that they tried to end it in 1722 by issuing a proclamation forbidding any social exchanges between the two Peoples. Dated August 1, 1722, by Richard Philipp, Governor of Acadia. Under its provisions it became illegal for Acadians to entertain a Mi'kmaq in any manner. How strictly it was enforced is reflected in the minutes of a Council meeting held on May 22, 1725:

“The Honourable Lt. Governor, John Doucett, acquainted the board that Prudane Robichau, senior inhabitant in the Cape, had entertained an Indian in his house, contrary to His Excellency's proclamation, dated August 1, 1722. That he had therefore put him in irons and in prison amongst the Indians for such heinous misdemeanour. This was to terrify the other inhabitants from clandestine practices of betraying the English subjects, into Indian hands. A petition by Robichau for release was then presented to Council for approval: The said petition being read. It is the opinion of the board, upon account of his age, and having been so long in irons, that upon the offers and promises he made in his petition of putting up as security goods and other chattels for his future good behaviour, he be set free.”

To date, I’ve found no evidence that the 1722 proclamation was rescinded. However, after the treaty of 1725 was ratified by the Mi’kmaq at Annapolis Royal in 1726, it wasn’t strictly enforced. During these years British authorities would at times take measures that penalized the Mi’kmaq or Acadiens, and try to play one party off against the other. It never worked, primarily because they communicated their experiences with the English to each other, and many of the barbarities committed against one party often penalized both.

For instance, there is convincing evidence that when bounties for Mi’kmaq scalps, including those of women and children, were offered in Nova Scotia by Massachusetts Governor William Shirley in 1744, prosecuted by the Bay colony’s Captain John Gorham’s bloodthirsty “Gorham’s Rangers,” by Governor Edward Cornwallis's 1749 and 1750, and by Governor Charles Lawrence in 1756, many scalps of mixed bloods, as well as some full blood Acadiens, were also harvested.

http://www.danielnpaul.com

quizzical

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Yes quizzical your ancestors and mine share a history that goes back nearly 400 years. My first maternal ancestor to settle from the Lowlands in Europe arrived in Port Royal in 1626.  If one studies that history they find that the divide and conquer logic that MartinN is lauding while denouncing the hereditary Chiefs is as old as British North America.

Some First Nations in what is now Maine and the Maritimes supported the British and some supported the French and some tried to stay out of the wars. The Acadians at that point in the 1750's were trying to follow their 100 year old tradition of accepting the laws of whichever Empire claimed their homeland while remaining neutral and not subject to conscription by either the French or English. They certainly never asked for one of that eras major military installations to be constructed on their doorstep. When the scalping laws where introduced the Acadians also protested to the British Governors because as far as the Bostonians were concerned both of our ancestors around the bay were fair "game."

I will continue to stand with indigenous peoples who ask for my support as the Chiefs at this camp have done.

recovering some histories at least has been a long process for me. then i was heartbroken at what was lost and am now ok as can be with it. which actually is not much. am thinking about going back to take aboriginal law and have been looking into it.

my gma was out this past summer. lots was shared and learned. much more than when i was in Cape Breton last. what has been lost is mind boggling.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

I graduated from law school at 42, so I say go for it.

Martin N.

quote: I will continue to stand with indigenous peoples who ask for my support as the Chiefs at this camp have done.

Please point out where the Chiefs have asked for your support. The white parasites have offered support, uninvited. There is that talking instead of listening thingy again, quizzical, but tell us more about YOU and how you feel, being two generations away from indigenous yourself.

I envy you your tenuous indigenous heritage. You can be white when required but still trot out your indigenous credentials when necessary. Nice.

I'm not going to share my life with you except to say that I do not have the luxury of such mixed heitage, other than the odd white teepee creeper in the distance past, although that is only a guess. I say luxury because, no matter how successful I am or the security of that black credit card in my pocket, any gap-toothed mouthbreather, drunk or sober can take it all away. And, no, I'm not Asian.

Martin N.

epaulo13 wrote:

We Pledge to Stand with Unist'ot'en

The Unist’ot’en camp, a permanent Indigenous re-occupation of Wet’suwet’en land in northern B.C., is currently on high alert. Coastal GasLink Pipeline has applied for an injunction, as well as served notice for a civil lawsuit to claim financial damages for “occupying, obstructing, blocking, physically impeding or delaying access” against Unist’ot’en camp on their own unceded territory. Instead of recognizing the collective hereditary leadership of the Wet'suwet'en, the legal notices target two individuals Freda Huson and Warner Naziel.

Coastal Gaslink's application for an injunction will be heard on Monday December 10. Let Unist'ot'en Camp know they are not alone.

~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~
TAKE THE PLEDGE
~~~~~~~~~~~~~~~

1. WE COMMEND the courage and vision of Unist’ot’en Camp.

2. WE ARE WATCHING across the province, country and internationally.

3. WE DENOUNCE any attempt by Coastal GasLink Pipeline, federal government, provincial government or RCMP to interfere in the rights of the Unist’ot’en to occupy, manage or maintain their lands.

4. WE DEMAND that any and all actions taken by the federal and provincial government, industry, and policing agencies must be consistent with the United Nations Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples and Anuk Nu'at'en (Wet'suwet'en laws) and collective Title.

5. WE PLEDGE support to the frontline land defenders of Unist’ot’en Camp and affirm the collective hereditary governance of the Wet'suwet'en who are enforcing Wet'suwet'en laws on their unceded lands.

quote:

Initial List of Signatories

ORGANIZATIONS:

350 dot org
Alliance Against Displacement
Alliance for People's Health
BROKE (Burnaby Residents Opposing Kinder Morgan Expansion)
Canada Philippines Solidarity for Human Rights
Canadian Centre for Policy Alternatives BC Office
Civil Liberties Defense Center
Coalition of South Asian Women Against Violence
Community Action Bus
Council of Canadians
Dogwood BC
East Indian Defence Committee
FANG Collective
Gabriela BC
Greenpeace Canada
Idle No More
Indigenous Health Curriculum Action Group, McMaster Medical School
Indigenous Land Defense Across Borders
International League of Peoples Struggle
Island Solidarity
L'eau Est la Vie
Liberation Health Collective
Migrant Workers Alliance for Change
Mining Injustice Solidarity Network
Mining Justice Action Committee
No Mas Muertas/No More Deaths
No More Silence
No One Is Illegal – Vancouver
Ontario Coalition Against Poverty
Raise the Rates BC
Retail Action Network
Rising Tide Toronto
Sanctuary Health
Secwepemc Women Warriors
SFU Institute for the Humanities
Sierra Club BC
Simon Fraser Public Interest Research Group (SFPIRG)
Skeena Watershed Conservation Coalition
Social Coast
Social Justice Studies, University of Victoria
Solidarity Halifax
Stand dot earth
Streams of Justice
Sum Of Us
Teaching Support Staff Union Executive
The Leap
The Red Nation
Tiny House Warriors
Toronto Overdose Prevention Society
Trikone Vancouver
Unist'ot'en Solidarity Brigade
Vancouver Area Network of Drug Users
Vancouver Tenants Union
Western Aboriginal Harm Reduction Society
Wilderness Committee

INDIVIDUALS:

Alicia Elliott, Writer
Ashley Bomberry , Film and Theatre Artist
Aylan Couchie, Artist and Writer
Bill McKibben, co-founder of 350 dot org
Brandon Rhéal Amyot, Activist and Pride Organizer
Clayton Thomas-Muller, Indigenous Climate Campaigner
Councillor Rev. Christine Boyle, Vancouver City Councillor
Desmond Cole, Author
Genevieve Fuji Johnson, Professor, Department of Political Science, SFU
Dr. Glen Coulthard (Yellowknives Dene), Assistant Professor, UBC
Harsha Walia, Author
Dr. Hayden King, Executive Director, Yellowhead Institute
Howard Breen, Organizer, Extinction Rebellion
Helen Knott, Author
Councillor Jean Swanson, Vancouver City Councillor
Jesse Piedfort, Director - Sierra Club Washington State Chapter
Judy Rebick, Writer
Leanne Betasamosake Simpson, Author
Councillor Keenan Aylwin, Barrie City Councillor
Dr. Margaret McGregor
Maude Barlow, Author
Melina Laboucan-Massimo (Lubicon Cree), David Suzuki Fellow
Micheal D. Sawyer, Environmental Consultant
Migizi Bebaayaa, Artist
Naomi Klein, Author
Nick Estes (Kul Wicasa Oyate), Assistant Professor, University of the New Mexico
Dr. Pam Palmater, Ryerson Chair in Indigenous Governance
Councillor Pete Fry, Vancouver City Councillor, Green Party
Raven Davis, Artist and Community Educator
Robyn Maynard, Author
Russ Diabo, Spokesperson for Defenders of the Land
Dr. Sarah Hunt (Kwakwaka’wakw), Assistant Professor, UBC
Shad Kabango, Artist
Dr. Shiri Pasternak, Research Director, Yellowhead Institute

We,We,We,We,We. Mind your own business, the Unist'ot'en don't need you, you need them.

quizzical

funny Martin most indigenous no longer recognize degree given the test for the haplo gene. there's really no getting around it. indigenous have it in the same measure regardless the colour of browness in our skin. 

even back to Jean Baptiste who spoke eloquently about "mixed heritage" meaning little.

you want to shrug yours off by trivializing but you at least admit i suppose.

stop trying to silence it won't work. you sound like Trump calling Elizabeth Warren Pocahontas.

Martin N.

You stop sticking your long white nose into affairs that are not your concern. Where do you get off speaking for "most aboriginals".

The Wet'suwet'en are as diverse politically as any other peoples. Right down to family members disagreeing. It is obvious that the white parasites only acknowledge the existence of those portions of the nation that they can USE to further their own agenda while willfully ignoring the rest of the nation.

The Wet'suwet'en are fully capable of settling their own issues with the federal government without everyone and their dog sticking their long white noses into the fray and diluting the Wet'suwet'en's processes by making the issue all about the white agenda.

It must come as a great shock to you white parasites that the noble indigenous can function, no less succeed without white guilt trip survivors' assistance. Be assured, that just like the diversity of political opinion, indigenous people are diverse in every other way and have educated professionals among them.

This fact, however does not suit the white parasite narrative, which must present indigenous peoples as poverty-stricken 'activists' united in their opposition to progress as 'keepers of the land' in order to piggyback their white agenda onto indigenous concerns.

Mind your own business.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

We Must Respect the Rights of Unist’ot’en Land Defenders

On November 26th, Coastal GasLink, a subsidiary of the TransCanada Corporation, applied for an injunction and served the Unist’ot’en camp with notice for a civil lawsuit.The Unist’ot’en camp is a non-violent gathering of Indigenous land defenders and members of the Unist’ot’en house group in Wet’suwet’en territory in northern BC. Under the authority of Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, these land defenders are actively practicing their inherent Indigenous Title and Rights to protect the land and pursue their right to self-determination. Coastal GasLink is seeking an interim, interlocutory or permanent injunction, as well as financial damages against the Unist’ot’en land defenders for “occupying, obstructing, blocking, physically impeding or delaying access” to their proposed project site.

A central tenant to the standards and rights affirmed within the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which both Canada and BC have endorsed and committed to implement, is the right of Indigenous peoples to protect their lands and territories, to maintain and strengthen their distinctive spiritual relationship with the lands and to own, use, develop and control those lands. Article 8 of the UN Declaration calls on States to provide effective mechanisms for prevention of any action which has the aim or effect of dispossessing indigenous peoples of their lands, territories or resources.

UBCIC calls upon the Canadian Justice system to uphold the human rights and dignity of Indigenous peoples. Indigenous land defenders must be treated with respect and must have their right to defend their lands and territories from the impacts of industry and climate change recognized and protected. The federal and provincial governments, industry and the various policing agencies have the responsibility to uphold the principles and standards of the UN Declaration and to respect the inherent Title and Rights of Indigenous Land Defenders.

 

Martin N.

You are not indigenous and I find it offensive that all the people who present as white try to weasel their way into the indigenous narrative.

You are correct, I suppose, that indigenousness is not acknowledged by degree but It is by whether one presents as white or indigenous and, especially by how much one has suffered at the hands of society as a whole.

Since you live in the Hwy 5 corridor, why don't you ask the Secwepmc Nation how they view your position?

Martin N.

epaulo13 wrote:

We Must Respect the Rights of Unist’ot’en Land Defenders

On November 26th, Coastal GasLink, a subsidiary of the TransCanada Corporation, applied for an injunction and served the Unist’ot’en camp with notice for a civil lawsuit.The Unist’ot’en camp is a non-violent gathering of Indigenous land defenders and members of the Unist’ot’en house group in Wet’suwet’en territory in northern BC. Under the authority of Wet’suwet’en hereditary chiefs, these land defenders are actively practicing their inherent Indigenous Title and Rights to protect the land and pursue their right to self-determination. Coastal GasLink is seeking an interim, interlocutory or permanent injunction, as well as financial damages against the Unist’ot’en land defenders for “occupying, obstructing, blocking, physically impeding or delaying access” to their proposed project site.

A central tenant to the standards and rights affirmed within the UN Declaration on the Rights of Indigenous Peoples, which both Canada and BC have endorsed and committed to implement, is the right of Indigenous peoples to protect their lands and territories, to maintain and strengthen their distinctive spiritual relationship with the lands and to own, use, develop and control those lands. Article 8 of the UN Declaration calls on States to provide effective mechanisms for prevention of any action which has the aim or effect of dispossessing indigenous peoples of their lands, territories or resources.

UBCIC calls upon the Canadian Justice system to uphold the human rights and dignity of Indigenous peoples. Indigenous land defenders must be treated with respect and must have their right to defend their lands and territories from the impacts of industry and climate change recognized and protected. The federal and provincial governments, industry and the various policing agencies have the responsibility to uphold the principles and standards of the UN Declaration and to respect the inherent Title and Rights of Indigenous Land Defenders.

 


How about the 'rights' of the rest of the Wet'suwt'en to determine their own future without you white parasites stealing their thunder?

You arrogant white busybodies are choosing sides in an internecine struggle that does not concern you.

How about showing some respect for the Wet'suwet'en Nation by keeping your long white nose out of their business. They are more than capable of looking out for themselves.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

MartinN you do not speak for anyone other than yourself and I only speak for myself. So I'll reiterate my personal opinion, you are a fascist who likes to play on a left board because you think you are superior to us lefties. So in all sincerity I must say go fuck yourself. For others on this board here is what the Unis’tot’en are asking for.

Will you come join the camp?

The hosts ask that all visitors sign up through the secure form here before arriving.

The camp is a safe, healthy, and enriching place for healing – please see our page about the Healing Centre.

If you are planning to visit for the first time, please read our sections on FPIC Protocol and Preparing for Your Visit.

Will you host a solidarity event?

In addition to physically being on the land, support from afar is also needed year-round to sustain the camp. Over the years, supporters have:

  • Hosted the Unist’ot’en for speaking engagements at colleges and community centers
  • Participated in solidarity actions bringing attention to the pipeline financiers
  • Held benefit concerts, parties, and art shows with funds going to the camp
  • Hosted community fundraiser dinners and film screenings of documentaries made at the camp
  • Provided their home communities with presentations about the camp after visiting
  • Connected the camp hosts with major news outlets to broadcast their campaigns, or created their own documentaries
  • Set up fundraising challenges with prizes to promote the campaigns
  • Subscribed and shared posts from the Unist’ot’en Facebook, Youtube, and other social media.

Can you do something from this list? Or do you have a creative idea of your own that will support the Unist’ot’en Camp? Get in touch with the camp hosts to get their consent and input on your solidarity event! (Due to the heavy volume of requests and messages the hosts receive, response may be delayed).

Will you donate in support?

You can make a secure online donation to the camp, or purchase supplies from the wishlist.

http://unistoten.camp/come-to-camp/call-to-action/

quizzical

Martin N. wrote:
You are not indigenous and I find it offensive that all the people who present as white try to weasel their way into the indigenous narrative. You are correct, I suppose, that indigenousness is not acknowledged by degree but It is by whether one presents as white or indigenous and, especially by how much one has suffered at the hands of society as a whole. Since you live in the Hwy 5 corridor, why don't you ask the Secwepmc Nation how they view your position?

they view my position as Metis as do i. my dad did not speak English until he was 6. 

never met an alienating indigenous person like yourself. not even among heredity Chiefs, living on reserve, or from those who have more recent reasons to fear colonizers than my family.   and my east coast family really only fears English colonizers.

my west coast family live on a pretty remote reserve and pretty much dislike all. and still they choose allies over enemies. peace and friendship over disharmony and discord.

 your type of division holds no power. 

NDPP

Unist'ot'en Camp is Under Threat in Northern Canada

https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/12/07/unistoten-camp-is-under-threat-i...

"The Unist'ot'en Camp does not have a better vision - they have a better reality. If you want to change the idea that Canada is white supremacist, this is your call to action..."

"WE are Power."

https://youtu.be/WNr4Lw4XBHU

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Over a hundred in the office of the Transcanada Coastal Gaslink in solidarity with Unist’ot’en one of five national and international grassroots rallies and actions in solidarity against the injunction and criminalization

Martin N.

The Federal Court of Appeal ruled on a similar matter earlier this year, siding with the elected Indigenous leaders over leaders who claim status because of family lineage or inherited titles as the legitimate representatives of their communities.

For example, in February 2018, the court dismissed a request for a judicial review from Donnie Wesley, a self-described hereditary tribal leader with the Lax Kw'alaams First Nation, on the Pacific NorthWest LNG project.

CBC News

Everyone and their dog is claiming hereditary chief status. It will be an interesting court case Thursday but it will have a very narrow focus.

The coalition of indigenous nations supporting pipelines will be in court against the tanker ban next. And, citing UNDRIP to demand the feds stop limiting their economic opportunities.

Martin N.

NDPP wrote:

Unist'ot'en Camp is Under Threat in Northern Canada

https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/12/07/unistoten-camp-is-under-threat-i...

"The Unist'ot'en Camp does not have a better vision - they have a better reality. If you want to change the idea that Canada is white supremacist, this is your call to action..."

"WE are Power."

https://youtu.be/WNr4Lw4XBHU

The only thing under threat is the blockade of a public bridge. There is NO threat to the camp which is far enough away, (a mile or so) to be of no consequence to public access.

There are a lot of indigenous people who want pipelines, jobs and prosperity but, they must be fascists for not agreeing with the white parasite neomarxist agenda.

Martin N.

quizzical wrote:

Martin N. wrote:
You are not indigenous and I find it offensive that all the people who present as white try to weasel their way into the indigenous narrative. You are correct, I suppose, that indigenousness is not acknowledged by degree but It is by whether one presents as white or indigenous and, especially by how much one has suffered at the hands of society as a whole. Since you live in the Hwy 5 corridor, why don't you ask the Secwepmc Nation how they view your position?

they view my position as Metis as do i. my dad did not speak English until he was 6. 

never met an alienating indigenous person like yourself. not even among heredity Chiefs, living on reserve, or from those who have more recent reasons to fear colonizers than my family.   and my east coast family really only fears English colonizers.

my west coast family live on a pretty remote reserve and pretty much dislike all. and still they choose allies over enemies. peace and friendship over disharmony and discord.

 your type of division holds no power. 

You need to get out of the house more often if you think all indigenous people are stereotypical CBC victimkind. Most of us get up and go to work. We have no time for idle protests. The news media has no interest in us because we offer no opportunity for handwringing and grievance mongering.

NDPP

Of course the Federal Court of Appeal sided with the elected system. That's what they're there for. And Canada's Torys' Law Firm, Frank Iacobucci and his ilk are also perfect for this kind of dirty brokerage . As always there is no shortage of dupes and collaborators all around. But there is also a resistance...

Secwepemc Women Warrior Society Says No To Kinder Morgan (TM) Pipeline

https://twitter.com/Weasel_Woman/status/1071641491557113856

Martin N.

Hmmm. So if one continues down the neomarxist logic trainway the court decision rendering the TransMountain approval void is also "dirty brokerage" n'est ce pas?

Didn't think so. You failed communist global village opportunists never miss an opportunity for hypocracy, do you? Or an opportunity to co-opt indigenous folk into your new world order ideology.

My vision of the 'activist'/ indigenous relationship is more of poor old Dobbin heading to the glue factory as the activists, er ah, pigs take over the farm house. You have no interest in indigenous people sorting out their affairs and advancing their nations but simply support whatever faction will advance your agenda. Keep your long white noses out of aboriginal affairs, parasites.

quizzical

Martin you're just trying to shut down discussion with your abuse. 

how about you stop. you motives are obvious and ugly.

 

MegB

Martin, your commenting has degenerated from arrogant disrespect to outright assholery. If I have to read the phrase "long white noses" one more time I will ban you out of sheer annoyance. 

NDPP

Yellowhead Brief: An Injunction Against the Unist'ot'en Camp: An Embodiment of Healing Faces Extinction

https://t.co/XbFrEYhKJ3

The fate of the Unist'ot'en Healing Centre and the Caretakers' Home rests on an injunction application in BC tomorrow. The decision will be a litmus test for Aboriginal title in Canada.

Martin N.

MegB wrote:

Martin, your commenting has degenerated from arrogant disrespect to outright assholery. If I have to read the phrase "long white noses" one more time I will ban you out of sheer annoyance. 

I am truly sorry for your annyance, Meg. I know how bothersome such as annoyance can be . I guess the nuns didn't beat me enough because I escaped them without the humility and victinhood these institutions are designed to instill in lesser beings.

Thank you for confirming that my opinions are nothing more than arrogant, disrespectful assholery. The opinions of the itinerant indigenous contrarian must not be allowed to invade the white liberal consciousness that all indigenous folk are victims, eternally blessed by the support of white guilt trip devotees and gently guided to proper respect for white liberal ideologies and agendas.

As an arrogant, disrespectful purveyor of "assholery", I must say that my intellectual cognizance is sufficient for me to communicate without descending into the vulgar but I also suppose that if one is arrogant and disrespectful enough to question the reigning orthodoxy such a picayune reference is beyond the pale.

I am coming to the conclusion that there are never two or more positions allowed.in discussions here, rather the only positions allowed are varying degree of acceptance of the reigning orthodoxy with the disciples of orthodoxy piling on vigorously to counter any Jakobite tendencies on the part of waverers, never mind the free will of such a heretic a my own self.

It must come to you as outright arrogant, disrespectful heresy to hear me utter the fact, fact I say, that indigenous folk are just as diverse as the general population when white liberal righteousness has ingrained the notion that all indigenous are victims, desperate for the succour of white liberalism.

To prove this canon, white liberals simply refuse to entertain any evidence that there are non- victim indigenous and silence them accordingly.

This is the root cause of your annoyance. That an indigenous person has the nerve to tell you and your cohort of white liberal guilt trippers to but out of our business.

Martin N.

NDPP wrote:

Yellowhead Brief: An Injunction Against the Unist'ot'en Camp: An Embodiment of Healing Faces Extinction

https://t.co/XbFrEYhKJ3

The fate of the Unist'ot'en Healing Centre and the Caretakers' Home rests on an injunction application in BC tomorrow. The decision will be a litmus test for Aboriginal title in Canada.

Oh, meadow muffins. The injunction has nothing to do with the camp, only the blockade of a provincial bridge. These disingenuous statements do nothing to further Wet'suwt'en interests, they further only the neomarxist political agenda.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Heiltsuk Nation Issues Statement of Support for Unist’ot’en Camp

Bella Bella, Heiltsuk Territory – The Heiltsuk Tribal Council extends its support and solidarity to the Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chiefs and Unist’ot’en Camp as they face the threat of an injunction from LNG Canada and TransCanada. The power and autonomy of hereditary leaders and community land and water protectors is the lifeblood of our relationship to our unceded homelands.

 In Heiltsuk governance, it is our hereditary chiefs, our title and rights holders, who lead us in our work to govern and protect our territory. One of the tools we use to do this work in our territory is the Delgamuuk decision, a critical legal precedent that guides and empowers us; we uplift our Wet’suwet’en relatives who are fighting to ensure that decision is upheld.

As coastal people who rely on the integrity of our waterways, we also uplift those who are opposing a pipeline corridor that would put all of our communities at risk. To the Wet’suwet’en Hereditary Chiefs and Unist’ot’en Camp: we recognize and uplift your strength, your determination, and we stand with you from Heiltsuk territory.

NDPP

Martin, you back whoever you wish and I'll do the same. I am quite familar with those I back, their opposition, and the reasons I support the former not the latter. And incidentally, historically settler enviros and the Canadian liberal left usually go with the collaborators not the resistors. There appear to be reasons to hope this may be changing.

Martin N.

The difference between you and I, NDPP, is that I am not 'backing' anyone. I am saying that this protest is part and parcel of the only leverage that indigenous folks have to drag the feds into a legitimate land claims process and that white activist preoccupation with pipelines is stealing their thunder.

If the federal government negotiated honestly rather than limiting discussions to a neocolonial framework that supports the white colonialist agenda via the Indian Act or even opened the Act up to progressive innovations, Canada would not be in this impasse.

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