Nicaragua

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iyraste1313
Nicaragua

watching  the protests against the Sandanista grow throughout the country, as the police brutality and assasinations continue...

No this is not a colour revolution organized through the CIA...even the base of the Sandinista movement is outraged...the leadership of the country will be forced out leading to chaos, without any serious organized political alternative....

The global financial collapse is behind this....lack of work opportunities, diminishing exports, so much of the country not being planted........

This I expect to see in Canada when the crisis hits us, where there remains zero alternatives to the support of the global economic system, except perhaps in some pockets amongst the sovereigntist indigenous movements...

iyraste1313

You can`t help but fall in love with this country....ongoing, the people are amassing to demand peace and security for Nicaragua, an end to the crisis and conflict in perhaps the only country in Central America where government has given a damn for its people! A country, clean, based on a cooperative economy, where security of the streets is guaranteed!

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

(self-delete.  Dupe posts).

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Ortega should have retired a term or two ago.  It was one thing for the guy to want to returnt eh FSLN to power, he didn't need to try to hang on to the job for life.

We can only hope that teh anarchists have worked out some sort of plan to create a libertarian socialist alternative structure.  

It could only be a tragedy if the rich ended up running the place again.  Nicaragua has nothing to gain from higher food, water, and fuel prices, wage cuts, the end of job security or exploitative "maquila" type corporations.  All any of that can be, as all any of neoliberalism has ever been anywhere, is theft.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

The Family-Party-State Nexus in Nicaragua

quote:

The Family-Party-State Nexus

Since resuming the presidency in 2007, Ortega has governed through a close alliance with Nicaragua’s principal business groups. COSEP, the main private business organization, had a highly conflictual relation with the Sandinista government in the 1980s but has enjoyed very close relations with the current government. The American Chamber of Commerce, which includes the major U.S. companies in the country, has also worked closely with the government, although after a heavily contested election in early 2018 the head of Cargill’s Nicaraguan subsidiary became president after campaigning for a more independent path. The government has also been able to count on the support of the leaders of the main unions, which are affiliated to the FSLN.

Ortega has tried to ensure that no political force emerges on the left and the breakaway MRS was unable to register for the elections in 2016. There are numerous right-wing parties, but they are small and in many cases little more than the personal fiefdoms of their leaders. Among the larger groups, the Partido Liberal Constitucionalista (PLC), which won the elections in 1996, has since the early 2000s provided political support for Ortega, initially under a ‘pact’ which allowed its leader, Aleman, to serve his jail sentence for corruption on his rural estate.

The other main right-wing grouping, the Partido Liberal Independiente (PLI), was the leading force in an electoral front which could have provided the most serious opposition to Ortega at the elections in 2016. However, this was effectively undermined a few months before the election when the country’s supreme court, which is dominated by Sandinista appointees, handed control of the party to a minority group. The party’s original candidates for the presidency and vice-presidency were prevented from running and its 28 representatives in the national assembly had to relinquish their seats. The PLI’s long-time leader – a banker – has since retired and former members of the party have established two new political organizations: Cuidadanos por la Libertad (CxL), which obtained legal recognition in May 2017, took part in the municipal elections later in the year; the Frente Amplio por la Democracia (FAD), by contrast, argues that current elections are a farce and it is concentrating on building a new movement from the base up.

At the general election in 2016, when the FSLN principal candidates, Daniel Ortega and Rosaria Murillo obtained 72% of the vote, the turnout was reportedly low as many people, including FSLN supporters, apparently considered the result to be a foregone conclusion. In the vote for the National Assembly, the FSLN obtained 70 out of 91 seats, with 14 seats going to Ortega’s tamed opposition, the PLC.

Ortega himself makes relatively few public appearances and there are unofficial reports that he is in poor health. Murillo, who was already playing an important role in coordinating the work of different government ministries, has come to play an increasing role in managing the day to day government of the country. Virtually all ministerial announcements are now made by Murillo, usually during a regular mid-day radio broadcast, and the mayors of the FSLN controlled municipalities are required to attend regular meetings with her in Managua. She has also build a strong base of support in the Sandinista youth movement, which has an important presence in the universities.

iyraste1313

 She has also build a strong base of support in the Sandinista youth movement, which has an important presence in the universities......

Don´t know how the mass demo went yesterday in Managua...but the youth, the students are horrified with the Sandinista leadership...my talks with Sandinista leadership at the base is a regret for the errors of their leadership...

but the Sandisnista movement at the base is strong and proud of its achievements, particular in the cooperative, worker and campesino movements...I cannot possibly see how this could be overturned by a rightist electoral win

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Capitalist Development in Nicaragua and the Mirage of the Left

The image carefully cultivated by Nicaraguan President Daniel Ortega and his supporters as the standard-bearers of the popular revolutionary process led by the Sandinista National Liberation Front (FSLN) in the 1980s has all but crumbled in the wake of the mass protests that broke out last month against pension reform that left dozens of people dead, and hundreds injured and jailed. For some, the protests were a plot organized by the United States to destabilize a revolutionary government. For others, it was an explosion of mass discontent against a corrupt and authoritarian regime.

quote:

While the FSLN retains a mass, if dwindling, base among the country's peasantry and urban poor, the FSLN leadership has made pacts with the traditional oligarchy; suppressed dissent; enriched itself through plunder of state resources and an alliance with transnational capital; and deployed the army, police and paramilitary forces to violently repress peasants, workers and social movements opposing its policies.

Now capitalist development is entering into crisis in Nicaragua. The government's announcement that it would cut pension payments to retirees and increase the contribution required by workers and businesses into the pension was the spark that ignited the April uprising. But political tension and social conflict has been building up for years, and it is this crisis of capitalism that forms the larger backdrop to the recent events.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Roadblocks and possibilities: The Nicaraguan student insurrection

Canadian internationalist feminist Lori Hanson, who has been working in solidarity with rural Nicaraguans for more than 30 years, has just returned from Nicaragua. Jack Hicks interviewed her for New Socialist. Together, they crafted this piece based on the interview and an article Lori previously wrote for the Greek newspaper, AlterThess. The analysis of an emerging movement in Nicaragua is a work in progress for Lori, who continues to work with Nicaraguans on the deeper meaning of a 44 day-long uprising and the state violence that has accompanied it in April and May, 2018.

quote:

Hanson: Last Monday morning students from the Nicaraguan University of Engineering (UNI) decided to return to occupying their campus in solidarity with the students of three other public universities in Managua, that have been en las trincheras – barricaded in and occupying the universities since April 19. UNI is of symbolic importance to the regime of President Daniel Ortega as many engineers, IT specialists, and others graduate from it, providing the technical brains to operationalize Ortega’s pseudo-socialist, neoliberal extractivist, crony capitalist agenda.

Although spontaneous, leaderless, and uncoordinated in their initial self-organized (autoconvocado) mobilizations, the anger that welled up after the first students were killed on April 19 quickly manifested in university students and other civilians working to support each other across the country. The movement didn’t get its start in April – there are antecedents – but the spark has ignited, and it has grown exponentially over the past 45 days. UNI students had been participating in the occupations of the other universities, but it would seem that their return to take their campus took the regime by surprise.

By noon on Monday, para-police forces – known locally as turbas – had moved on the campus. Videos show Hilux trucks filled with armed men shooting wildly from the street.[1] The riot squad police joined them later in the afternoon. It was a renewed level of response and repression – the police had been absent, some say in civil disguise, for days. At the end of the day there were two more dead and reports of 22 to 40 detained. The America’s director of Amnesty International was on the campus during the stand-off with the forces of repression, and posted powerful cellphone video of the attack...

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..i'm having great difficulty sorting things out in nicaragua. lots of interventions/interference from the us, the media and the rich. plus ortaga himself is creating problems by cozying up to the imf and capital then promising reform. this can't be done in my experience. one comes at the cost of the other. 

Nicaraguan Negotiations Suspended: A Return to Violence? (Pt. 1 & 2)  

Following two months of protests and an estimated 170 dead, the violence briefly subsided, as opposition-government negotiations tried to resolve the situation. The opposition now says the government is reneging on commitments and will abandon negotiations. What led to this crisis and where will it go from here? We discuss the situation with Trevor Evans and Camilo Mejia

NDPP

The US and Nicaragua: A Case Study in Historical Amnesia and Blindness

https://www.counterpunch.org/2018/06/15/the-us-nicaragua-a-case-study-in...
 

"What is happening now in Nicaragua is not revolution, but in fact counterrevolution. And, this is no less true because there are some self-described leftists who are participating in and cheering on this uprising..."

 

NDPP

US Govt Meddling Machine Boasts of 'Laying the Groundwork for Insurrection' in Nicaragua

https://grayzoneproject.com/2018/06/19/ned-nicaragua-protests-us-governm...

"As Nicaraguan student protest leaders meet with neoconservatives in Washington DC, a publication funded by the US government's regime change arm, the National Endownment for Democracy (NED), boasts of spending millions of dollars 'laying the groundwork for insurrection' against Daniel Ortega..."

 

As Demonstrators Demand Nicaraguan President's Resignation, Government Accuses Opposition of Coup (and vid)

https://youtu.be/ZdKJcg3M-No

"The political crisis in Nicaragua is intensifying..."

NDPP

Corbyn, Chomsky and Now Nicaragua

https://on.rt.com/9b8g

"An open letter has slammed the Guardian for 'wildly innacurate coverage of Nicaragua.' It's the latest condemnation of a newspaper which positions itself as a champion of the left, but is increasingly accused of attacking it..."

NDPP

Max Blumenthal Interviews Daniel Ortega

https://youtu.be/ai_fCZ9slAc

"Nicaragua President Daniel Ortega held a wide-ranging interview with Grayzone editor Max Blumenthal on July 25 in Managua. The two discussed the coup attempt that Ortega's Sandanista government has just faced down and the factors behind it."

NDPP

Crashing the System (podcast)

https://twitter.com/comradeSammy/status/1024668158043533312

Eyewitness Nicaragua with Max Blumenthal

josh