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Doug Woodard
NDPP
ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Matveev's collection of commentary about Syria (including his own boot-licking pro-Obama blather) is very telling. Russia is "like everyone else" wrt Syria.

Wrong, asshole. Russia has literally saved the day. But now that the terrorists are getting their asses kicked, the whole story will disappear from Western MSM, and its Soros-inspired echo chamber, and the concern of Ilya Matveev. 

 

SeekingAPolitic...
ikosmos ikosmos's picture

SeekingAPoliticalHome wrote:
Waiting on American take.

lol. RFEL is Radio "Free" Europe and Radio "Liberty", both tending towards the virulently Russophobic and virulently anti-left. That IS an American take - albeit an extreme right-wing one. 

The other, ZeroHedge, OTOH, is a financial news source with unclear sources. They're all over the map, politically.

The news looks very good - except if you were planning to make a huge profit from thermonuclear war.

Bec.De.Corbin Bec.De.Corbin's picture

ikosmos wrote:

SeekingAPoliticalHome wrote:
Waiting on American take.

lol. RFEL is Radio "Free" Europe and Radio "Liberty", both tending towards the virulently Russophobic and virulently anti-left. That IS an American take - albeit an extreme right-wing one. 

The other, ZeroHedge, OTOH, is a financial news source with unclear sources. They're all over the map, politically.

The news looks very good - except if you were planning to make a huge profit from thermonuclear war.

LOL at you; did you even read the RFEL artical? (of course you didn't) It was very positve towards the Trump/Putin phone conversation. So WFT are you yacking about?

bekayne

ikosmos wrote:

The news looks very good - except if you were planning to make a huge profit from thermonuclear war.

Trumps wants to increase spending on nukes, so there's money to be made.

NDPP

Putin & Trump Discuss Syria and US-Russia Relations in Phone Call (and vid)

https://www.rt.com/news/366925-putin-trump-phone-call/

"US President-elect Donald Trump and Russian President Vladimir Putin have held their first telephone call, in which the two leaders discussed Syria and agreed to improve and develop bilateral ties, the Kremlin said in a statement."

Ultimately, I predict this going nowhere. Elite interests including the military industrial complex have too much invested in Russia-as-enemy.

josh

"Trump thanked Putin for his aid and support in the recent election.  'Heckeuva job, Vlady,' Trump said."

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

babbler josh (just making shit up) ? wrote:
"Trump thanked Putin for his aid and support in the recent election.  'Heckeuva job, Vlady,' Trump said."

Source? Out of your own ass, maybe?

RT wrote:
Earlier Monday, Kremlin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said that Moscow didn’t plan to contact President-elect Trump before his inauguration in January 2017, but he couldn't entirely rule out the possibility of such contacts, including letters, telephone calls and meetings. Peskov’s statement came in response to speculations that Donald Trump’s team had contacted Russian officials on numerous occasions."

Question more.

josh

Now, would I just make shit up?  Of course you could always hack my computer and find out. 

josh

Sen. Lindsey Graham (R-S.C.) on Tuesday said he wants Senate hearings to investigate whether Russian President Vladimir Putin interfered in the U.S. election, casting doubts on President-elect Donald Trump's desire to improve relations with Russia. "Assuming for a moment that we do believe that the Russian government was controlling outside organizations that hacked into our election, they should be punished," Graham told reporters on Capitol Hill. "Putin should be punished."

U.S. officials have said the Kremlin was responsible for hacking into Democratic National Committee computers over the summer and releasing information that damaged Democratic nominee Hillary Clinton's campaign. 

http://www.huffingtonpost.com/entry/russia-dnc-hack-lindsey-graham_us_582bb306e4b0e39c1fa703d5

 

 

josh
ikosmos ikosmos's picture

josh wrote:
Russia withdraws from the ICC.

True. They've followed the lead of the USA which, even according to the CNN report, never had any intention of ratifying the Treaty. 

Here's more on the Russian position.

Quote:
... in the statement that Russia is concerned with the ICC's attitude toward the events of August 2008: "The attack carried out by Saakashvili's regime on peaceful Tskhinvali, the murder of Russian peacemakers brought accusations from the ICC addressed to South Ossetian fighters and Russian military personnel. The eventual investigation of Georgian administrative officials' actions and orders was purposefully left to Georgia's jurisdiction and remains out of the ICC's attention focus."

"Such an about turn speaks for itself. In these circumstances, it is hardly possible to talk about trusting the ICC," the statement said.

The butchery by the Western-sponsored tie-chewing cannibal, Saakashvili, was the beginning of a period of atrocities in which the Western barbarians, repeatedly, murdered Russian nationals, or ethnic Russians, first in South Ossetia, then in Ukraine, etc., etc. All this was cheerleaded by the ICC.

Good riddance.

Read more: https://sputniknews.com/world/201611161047495135-russia-rome-statut-icc/

swallow swallow's picture

Russia was never a member of the ICC. Putin, exactly like G.W. Bush before him, has simply "un-signed" a treaty that his country never ratified. 

6079_Smith_W

https://themoscowtimes.com/news/trump-named-honorary-russian-cossack-56070

U.S. President-elect Donald Trump has been named an honorary Russian Cossack — the fearsome warrior clan known for their daring feats on the battlefield, Russian tabloid Life News reported Wednesday.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Looks like an interesting piece FROM THE LEFT about the characteristic features of imperialism in Russia today.

This should be interesting. The resident, pathological Russophobes and anti-Communists won't know what to do! How can you criticize Russian capitalism when the critique comes from Russian Communists?! The horror!

Quoting George Soros funded neo-liberal institutions won't cut it. Delicious. Which disgusting prejudice will win out? Pathological Russophobia or virulent anti-Communism? Christmas comes early! Because there's nothing quite so amazing as one kind of bigotry overcome by another!

Happy trails!

Communist Party of the Russian Federation: "In Russia we see all the features of imperialism named by Lenin. It is monopolistic, parasitic and decaying capitalism..."

Quote:
At present there is much talk in the world about globalization and globalism. Proceeding from Lenin’s characterization of imperialism, the CPRF has identified the following main features of globalism:
1. Productive industrial capital is being totally enslaved by financial and speculative capital.

2. At the world level “market relations” have turned into an artificial mechanism of unequal exchange and plunder of entire countries and peoples.

3. The global model of “international division of labor” consolidates the appalling social inequalities on the planetary scale.

4. The political influence of transnational corporations and financial-industrial groups aspiring to unlimited sovereignty of actions is increasing sharply.

5. National governments are losing control over the processes in the world economy. Fundamental norms of international law are being revised to create global power structures.

6. Information and cultural expansion is actively used as a form of aggression. We witness growing spiritual uniformity at the most primitive level. National features of countries and peoples are being eradicated.

7. Transnational capital is becoming increasingly parasitic. It enjoys the benefits from the introduction of high technologies while the rest of the world lives in poverty. Scientific and technical progress is stagnating and its quality is deteriorating. The exploitative predatory nature of imperialism is vividly manifested today. Because the profit margin tends to decline capitalism is fighting this trend by stepping up exploitation, financial speculations and military adventures.

The international situation is deteriorating. The USA and NATO are persistently expanding their presence in various parts of the world creating new military bases. Yugoslavia, Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, and Syria have become victims of aggression. The situation in the Middle East has been thrown into chaos. The migration crisis in Europe has been generated. National and religious conflicts are sharpening and raging.

The Russian CP calls for a kind of anti-imperialist unity based on internationalism and a class approach. They are still the second largest party in the State Duma (Parliament), despite the pressure put on them, the marginalization just as in Canada towards the left generally, etc., etc.

Quote:
In Russia the world socio-economic crisis is combined with the internal crisis caused by the restoration of capitalism and the bankruptcy of liberal bourgeois policy. The country has all the features of imperialism named by Lenin. It is monopolistic, parasitic and decaying capitalism. Russia is under growing outside pressure of stronger countries of the world capitalist system. They resort to economic sanctions, political blackmail and military threats.

Inside the Russian Federation the authorities are making further inroads on the rights of the working people. People’s incomes and living standards are falling, unemployment is growing and the majority of the people are sinking into poverty. The ruling circles propose to raise the retirement age and introduce a tax on unemployed people. The 2017 draft budget would cut spending on healthcare and education.

The Russian CP is making plans for the anniversary of the 1917 Great October Socialist Revolution in their country. They remain faithful to the aims of that revolution, which is peace and social justice for all. Good on them.

Quote:
Dear comrades,

Next year the CPRF, together with all the fraternal parties and movements, will mark the 100th anniversary of the Great October Socialist Revolution. The victory of the proletarian revolution in Russia in October 1917 was the key event of the ХХ century. It radically changed the course of humanity’s development. Thanks to the Great October Revolution the world’s first socialist state came into being. It provided an inspiring example for the working people of all countries who rose to fight the yoke of capital. The October Revolution found its continuation in the deeds of the builders of Socialism, in the heroism of anti-Fascists, in the defeat of Hitler’s Germany and militarist Japan, in the collapse of the colonial system, the inspiring Cuban Revolution, the courage of Che Guevara, Salvador Allende and Hugo Chavez and today’s successes of China and Vietnam.

Geoff

Russia remains the only country in the world that can offset, somewhat, the power of the US, which is all the more urgent, given that Trump will be führer for the next four years.

I don't relish the thought of cutting Putin any slack (too bad the CP wasn't in power, instead). However, I'm not sure what else to propose as an alternative right now. If there is one, I'm all ears. 

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Geoff wrote:

Russia remains the only country in the world that can offset, somewhat, the power of the US, which is all the more urgent, given that Trump will be führer for the next four years.

I don't relish the thought of cutting Putin any slack (too bad the CP wasn't in power, instead). However, I'm not sure what else to propose as an alternative right now. If there is one, I'm all ears. 

China should be added to that. What we are talking about, and certainly the Russians understand this, is a changed multi-polar world in which there is no hegemon barking orders to the rest of the planet. And I think a strengthened left, in all countries including Russia, would be a plus.

For Canada, our moribund, pro-imperialist "peace" movement really needs a new direction and improvement. Of any political movement in this country, the peace movement really needs strengthening with what the Russian CP has called an anti-imperialist approach. And they include, in their own country,  the United Russia (and Putin) as part of the problem.

Putin has some solid foreign policy. Brilliant, truth be told. My own view is that this is a complicated result of many factors - one of which, I like to think, is a residue or leftover from the Soviet era when that regime helped many, many countries in a truly disinterested manner. But foreign policy aside - Putin is just as conservative as the loud-mouthed Russophobes in the Western regimes and their captive MSM. I don't pretend to understand all of Russian politics - and it is a mistake to use some cookie-cutter left/right approach - but it seems to me that the same neo-liberal pressures push Putin to implement austerity domestically, just as the neo-liberals in Canada [whether they call themselves Conservatives, Liberals or NDPers] do the same here.

swallow swallow's picture

Good comments from the Russian CP - the Russian government is right-wing and imperialist. 

Do you agree with them, ikosmos? 

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

swallow wrote:
Good comments from the Russian CP - the Russian government is right-wing and imperialist. 

Do you agree with them, ikosmos?

Not so fast, smart ass. Do you or do you not agree with the analysis of the Russian Communist Party?

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

"State of the Union" from Russian President V.V. Putin

Sensible, oriented towards the solution of global problems, etc., etc. - as usual.

 

swallow swallow's picture

The Russian communist party analysis makes some great points. I'm most interested to read the strong dissent from the imperialist agenda of the current Russian government. 

Is the CP analysis, in your view, valid on this point? Or is it "MCCarthyism" and "Russophobia" since it is critical of the current government? 

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

swallow wrote:
The Russian communist party analysis makes some great points.

Which ones are great? How about the following? Or are just picking and choosing the ones that suit your apparent Russophobia?

Russian CP wrote:
The international situation is deteriorating. The USA and NATO are persistently expanding their presence in various parts of the world creating new military bases. Yugoslavia, Iraq, Afghanistan, Libya, and Syria have become victims of aggression. The situation in the Middle East has been thrown into chaos. The migration crisis in Europe has been generated. National and religious conflicts are sharpening and raging...

Next year the CPRF, together with all the fraternal parties and movements, will mark the 100th anniversary of the Great October Socialist Revolution. The victory of the proletarian revolution in Russia in October 1917 was the key event of the ХХ century. It radically changed the course of humanity’s development. Thanks to the Great October Revolution the world’s first socialist state came into being. It provided an inspiring example for the working people of all countries who rose to fight the yoke of capital. The October Revolution found its continuation in the deeds of the builders of Socialism, in the heroism of anti-Fascists, in the defeat of Hitler’s Germany and militarist Japan, in the collapse of the colonial system, the inspiring Cuban Revolution, the courage of Che Guevara, Salvador Allende and Hugo Chavez and today’s successes of China and Vietnam.

swallow swallow's picture

It's not my style of rhetoric, but I'd agree with the general line on everything in those 2 paragraphs. There's no question at all that the US is agressively imperialist all over the globe, and that the Russian revolution was formative for the 20th century. I've been to ultiple demonstrations against US intervention going back to my high school days.

Now do you want to answer my question, or just call me "russophobe" some more? 

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

OK, yeah, well I'm used to being treated as a leper around here, so I just go with the working assumption that you are hostile and antagonistic. So I was testing your sincerity upthread.

I can't really find any fault with what the Russian CP noted above, i.e., that Russia has all the characteristics of imperialism.

Having said that, they have a different sort of political culture and also the economic foundation than what we have here in North America. Something I only recently discovered was that Russia exports more in agricultural production than in arms or military, which surprised me, and maybe is a contributing factor towards (what I see as) their solid foreign policy, by and large. I've also, elsewhere here on babble, attributed that foreign policy to a kind of residue or legacy of the Soviet era, something positive still lingering, that can't entirely be squelched by the current ruling elites in that country.

In a word, they have a stronger left than we do.My two bits.

 

edited to add Dec 21/2016: The Syrian President in a recent interview addressed this question of Russian foreign policy. It's a perspective I don't usually take myself, but I repeat it here because it does address the question of "How is it that Russia can be neo-liberal at home, and far from that in her foreign policy?" etc. 

Bashar Al Assad basically noted that, even in the Soviet era but also today, the Russians were characterized by a kind of generosity in foreign policy, even, for example, when they disagreed with the Syrian approach in Lebanon some decades ago, and he attributed this to Russian moral character. They are willing to respect the other, even when disagreeing, and honour the principle of sovereignty ... religiously.

Like I said, I'm mostly reluctant to make a serious analysis of foreign policy based on such a thing. But Assad did so, in a recent interview.

swallow swallow's picture

Thank you.

[eit to add - for answering, not for that Assad bit just edited in]

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Ralph Fiennes wrote:
“Whatever happens politically, in terms of our culture and our understanding through music, drama, painting we have a deep connection,” he concluded.

"Aside from political squabbles, culture continues to transcend borders and serves as a bridge between the Russian and British people, who are perfectly able to communicate without politicians by means of art, renowned British film and stage actor Ralph Fiennes told RT."

See Ralph Fiennes at St. Petersburg International Culture Forum

related

 

bekayne

http://www.nytimes.com/2016/12/19/world/europe/austrias-far-right-signs-...

The Freedom Party leader, Heinz-Christian Strache, reported the signing of the agreement with United Russia, Mr. Putin’s party, on Monday on his Facebook page, where he also disclosed that he had visited General Flynn a few weeks ago in Trump Tower in New York.

“Internationally, the Freedom Party continues to gain in influence,” wrote Mr. Strache, a dental technician who has led the party since 2005.

...

The Freedom Party, founded in the 1950s by ex-Nazis...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Anton_Reinthaller

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Friedrich_Peter

 

josh

"Isn't it interesting how fascists always steal the word freedom." 

 

The Girl With The Dragon Tattoo

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

josh wrote:
from the film The Girl With the Dragon Tatoo: "Isn't it interesting how fascists always steal the word freedom." 

Well "freedom" can mean whatever one attributes to it. Consider - "Support the troops". What the hell does that actually mean? That the armed forces of a country deserve proper funding, pensions when they retire, and social respect for their difficult job? Maybe. Does it mean that whatever foreign policy they are expected to carry out - including the invasion of another country - they should be "supported"? Maybe. In the current political climate, this is the default. The phrase "support the troops" is empty, deliberately so, and can mean whatever we want it to mean. It is, therefore, meaningless ...

Ditto for freedom. Nice word. But the truth is always concrete. So anti-fascists should be concrete about what they mean. Freedom of the press, of opinion, of travel. Freedom from a polluted environment. Freedom from war. etc.

lagatta4

Careful, you've just quoted an anti-Stalinist leftist. Wink

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Actually, I quoted G W F Hegel as quoted by Plekhanov and Lenin. 'The truth is always concrete'.

josh

ikosmos wrote:

josh wrote:
from the film The Girl With the Dragon Tatoo: "Isn't it interesting how fascists always steal the word freedom." 

Well "freedom" can mean whatever one attributes to it. Consider - "Support the troops". What the hell does that actually mean? That the armed forces of a country deserve proper funding, pensions when they retire, and social respect for their difficult job? Maybe. Does it mean that whatever foreign policy they are expected to carry out - including the invasion of another country - they should be "supported"? Maybe. In the current political climate, this is the default. The phrase "support the troops" is empty, deliberately so, and can mean whatever we want it to mean. It is, therefore, meaningless ...

Ditto for freedom. Nice word. But the truth is always concrete. So anti-fascists should be concrete about what they mean. Freedom of the press, of opinion, of travel. Freedom from a polluted environment. Freedom from war. etc.

 

Ugh.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Russian President's year-end (FOUR hours long*, extemporaneous) press conference.

Never mind the content, which is fascinating. Just the fact that the Russian President does this, over and over again, is impressive. What Western leader does this? I mean, hours of off-the-cuff, detailed, sometimes humorous, answers to all and every question thrown at him.

The Duran wrote:
Russian President Vladimir Putin, during his end-of-year press conference on Friday, commented on Donald Trump’s victory, allegations of Russia’s interference in the US election, and responded to the recent comments made by Barack Obama, where he stated that “Ronald Reagan would roll over in his grave” knowing that “over a third of Republican voters approve of Vladimir Putin, the former head of the KGB.”

Russian President V. V. Putin: "“I don’t know who would be rolling in his grave. Reagan, I think, would have been glad to see the representatives of his party winning everywhere [in the election]. And he would have been happy for the president-elect, who subtly sensed the mood of society and campaigned in this paradigm. He [Trump] fought till the end even though nobody believed, except for us, that he would win.”

The last item is a joke. Putin is having a bit of fun with the endless, stupid, unsubstantiated claims about Russian interference in the US election, etc.. It's particularly amusing as the US regime has "interfered" with the internal politics of more countries than you or I have had hot breakfasts. And that includes war, bombing of Presidential Palaces, assassination (maybe even a recent Russian diplomat!), regime change, blockade, starvation, economic warfare, political interference, "color" revolutions, NGO subversion, information warfare, etc., etc..

Incidently, Putin was never head of the KGB. That is just a lie, repeated endlessly - this time by Nobel laureate US President Barak Obama.  Not that other political leaders didn't come from such a background: Yuri Andropov in the SU and George Bush Sr. in the USA, as just two examples.

 

.........................................

 

* Almost four hours long. Can you imagine any of the "intellectual heavyweights" like Trudeau, May, or Obama handling a four hour press conference on their own? aha ha ha ha!

Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

ikosmos wrote:

* Almost four hours long. Can you imagine any of the "intellectual heavyweights" like Trudeau, May, or Obama handling a four hour press conference on their own? aha ha ha ha!

I agree with you about Trudeau and May, but Obama is very smart, well informed and articulate. He easily compares to Putin in those categories. However, he has much less freedom of action than Putin, given his subservience to the real rulers of the U.S.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Michael Moriarity wrote:
I agree with you about Trudeau and May, but Obama is very smart, well informed and articulate. He easily compares to Putin in those categories. However, he has much less freedom of action than Putin, given his subservience to the real rulers of the U.S.

 

I've read that President Obama relies upon a telepromter like his predecessors. He certainly doesn't have any practice at doing this sort of thing. Putin, OTOH, does it every year, in a variety of venues, and faces some very unfriendly questions at times.

If Putin can do it, then Obama and the rest of the Western leaders can and should do it. Why not? That's what we should be asking.

montrealer58 montrealer58's picture

It is ironic that the Russian kleptocrat Putin is more press-accessible than Stephen Harper was...

josh

ikosmos wrote:

Russian President's year-end (FOUR hours long*, extemporaneous) press conference.

Never mind the content, which is fascinating. Just the fact that the Russian President does this, over and over again, is impressive. What Western leader does this? I mean, hours of off-the-cuff, detailed, sometimes humorous, answers to all and every question thrown at him.

The Duran wrote:
Russian President Vladimir Putin, during his end-of-year press conference on Friday, commented on Donald Trump’s victory, allegations of Russia’s interference in the US election, and responded to the recent comments made by Barack Obama, where he stated that “Ronald Reagan would roll over in his grave” knowing that “over a third of Republican voters approve of Vladimir Putin, the former head of the KGB.”

Russian President V. V. Putin: "“I don’t know who would be rolling in his grave. Reagan, I think, would have been glad to see the representatives of his party winning everywhere [in the election]. And he would have been happy for the president-elect, who subtly sensed the mood of society and campaigned in this paradigm. He [Trump] fought till the end even though nobody believed, except for us, that he would win.”

The last item is a joke. Putin is having a bit of fun with the endless, stupid, unsubstantiated claims about Russian interference in the US election, etc.. It's particularly amusing as the US regime has "interfered" with the internal politics of more countries than you or I have had hot breakfasts. And that includes war, bombing of Presidential Palaces, assassination (maybe even a recent Russian diplomat!), regime change, blockade, starvation, economic warfare, political interference, "color" revolutions, NGO subversion, information warfare, etc., etc..

Incidently, Putin was never head of the KGB. That is just a lie, repeated endlessly - this time by Nobel laureate US President Barak Obama.  Not that other political leaders didn't come from such a background: Yuri Andropov in the SU and George Bush Sr. in the USA, as just two examples.

 

.........................................

 

* Almost four hours long. Can you imagine any of the "intellectual heavyweights" like Trudeau, May, or Obama handling a four hour press conference on their own? aha ha ha ha!

Impressive for a fascist thief.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Putin's Withering Scorn for outgoing US President Barak Obama

Quote:

For Vladimir Putin and for Russia, 2016 has been, if not quite an anno mirabilis, nonetheless a good year.

As Putin pointed out at the start of his press conference, the economy is now clearly recovering, with all the productive sectors of the economy now showing growth, with inflation now expected to end the year at 5.5% – lower than expectations – and with the budget deficit also likely to be lower than expected.

In foreign policy, relations with China – the anchor upon which Russia’s international position rests – not only remain strong, but are growing stronger, enabling Russia to leverage its de facto alliance with China to achieve a breakthrough in its relations with the two big Far Eastern powers – South Korea and Japan.

Meanwhile Russia has maintained its traditionally strong relations with the other big Asian powers: India and Vietnam.

In the Middle East there has been a spectacular breakthrough, with Russia’s military intervention in Syria resulting in a conclusive victory in Aleppo, with Russia forging ever closer ties to Iran, and with a major turnaround in relations with Turkey – which at the start of the year had been terrible – and with Russia managing to maintain good relations with countries as diverse as Israel, Saudi Arabia and Egypt.

Russian success in preserving a dialogue with the Saudis in the face of every possible provocation, and despite the Russians and the Saudis supporting opposite sides in the war in Syria, bore fruit this year in an agreement between the Russians and the Saudis to stabilise oil prices.

Furthermore,

Quote:
The single most striking thing to come out of President Putin’s end-of-year press conference this year, was that he no longer felt the need to conceal his lack of respect and indeed his positive dislike for the outgoing US administration and for the current US President.  Though Putin’s comments appeared to address the particular issue of the hacking scandal, his carefully chosen words show that his feelings go far wider

V. V. Putin: "

The current US Administration and leaders of the Democratic Party are trying to blame all their failures on outside factors. I have questions and some thoughts in this regard.

We know that not only did the Democratic Party lose the presidential election, but also the Senate, where the Republicans have the majority, and Congress, where the Republicans are also in control. Did we, or I also do that? We may have celebrated this on the “vestiges of a 17th century chapel,” but were we the ones who destroyed the chapel, as the saying goes? This is not the way things really are. All this goes to show that the current administration faces system-wide issues, as I have said at a Valdai Club meeting.

It seems to me there is a gap between the elite’s vision of what is good and bad and that of what in earlier times we would have called the broad popular masses. I do not take support for the Russian President among a large part of Republican voters as support for me personally, but rather see it in this case as an indication that a substantial part of the American people share similar views with us on the world’s organisation, what we ought to be doing, and the common threats and challenges we are facing. It is good that there are people who sympathise with our views on traditional values because this forms a good foundation on which to build relations between two such powerful countries as Russia and the United States, build them on the basis of our peoples’ mutual sympathy.

They would be better off not taking the names of their earlier statesmen in vain, of course. I’m not so sure who might be turning in their grave right now. It seems to me that Reagan would be happy to see his party’s people winning everywhere, and would welcome the victory of the newly elected President so adept at catching the public mood, and who took precisely this direction and pressed onwards to the very end, even when no one except us believed he could win. (Applause).

The outstanding Democrats in American history would probably be turning in their graves though. Roosevelt certainly would be because he was an exceptional statesman in American and world history, who knew how to unite the nation even during the Great Depression’s bleakest years, in the late 1930s, and during World War II. Today’s administration, however, is very clearly dividing the nation. The call for the electors not to vote for either candidate, in this case, not to vote for the President-elect, was quite simply a step towards dividing the nation. Two electors did decide not to vote for Trump, and four for Clinton, and here too they lost. They are losing on all fronts and looking for scapegoats on whom to lay the blame. I think that this is an affront to their own dignity. It is important to know how to lose gracefully."

 

sherpa-finn

ikosmos wrote: Incidently, Putin was never head of the KGB. That is just a lie, repeated endlessly 

Don't sweat it. Its probably just some harmless confusion with acronyms. It is well known that Putin was a career officer in the KGB, rising to the rank of lieutenant colonel, and serving 'with distinction' for 5 years in East Germany.  

The KGB was restructured in 1991 following the involvement of its leadership in the failed putsch against Gorbachev. The different component units of the KGB were spun off into different organizations, which themselves underwent multiple realignments through the Yeltsin years.  

The principle security agency which emerged from this restructuring was the Federal Security Service (the FSB) which has primary responsibility for internal security issues, including counter-intelligence, border security, counter-terrorism, etc. In 1998, Yeltsin appointed Putin as head (Director) of the FSB, where he served until he was appointed Deputy PM. 

KGB ... FSB... to most observers it seems to be a case of "potayto, potahto".

 

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Michael Moriarity wrote:

ikosmos wrote:
* Almost four hours long. Can you imagine any of the "intellectual heavyweights" like Trudeau, May, or Obama handling a four hour press conference on their own? aha ha ha ha!

I agree with you about Trudeau and May, but Obama is very smart, well informed and articulate. He easily compares to Putin in those categories. However, he has much less freedom of action than Putin, given his subservience to the real rulers of the U.S.

An RT journalist weighed in here ...

Quote:
Look at Obama’s last press conference in a small room the size of a shoebox with hand-selected journalists that even have their names on the back of their seats. And then Vladimir Putin holding court with over 1,400 journalists firing questions at him for hours on end, and he is answering them on the fly. In terms of openness and access to media, you compare what is going on in Russia – it seems to be more modern and more progressive, at least in this theater, than what you have in the US. That to me is the most striking contrast there.

Obama: A small room the size of a shoebox with hand-selected journalists that even have their names on the back of their seats ...

versus

Putin: ... holding court with over 1,400 journalists firing questions at him for hours [four hours, fyi] on end, and he is answering them on the fly ...

You can't simply attribute this to "subservience to the "real" rulers". These guys are in a different class. And the difference puts Obama in a bad light. He's a lightweight.

Annual Putin Q&A presser with over 1,400 reporters 'more modern than US shoebox version'

josh

The Obama administration is close to announcing sanctions and other measures to penalize Russia for its attempts to interfere in U.S. elections this year, the Washington Post reported Tuesday night, citing anonymous U.S. officials.

The measures would include economic sanctions and a diplomatic censure, according to the report. The White House would also use covert actions "that will probably involve cyber-operations," the Post reported. 

http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/report-obama-prepares-sanctions-ru...

 

Sean in Ottawa

josh wrote:

The Obama administration is close to announcing sanctions and other measures to penalize Russia for its attempts to interfere in U.S. elections this year, the Washington Post reported Tuesday night, citing anonymous U.S. officials.

The measures would include economic sanctions and a diplomatic censure, according to the report. The White House would also use covert actions "that will probably involve cyber-operations," the Post reported. 

http://talkingpointsmemo.com/livewire/report-obama-prepares-sanctions-ru...

 

A certain UN vote was less about the people more affected and more about this I think.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Right. Sanctions on the basis of unsubstantiated claims of cyber-warfare and such. Obama is really going out with a bang.

Talk about trying to poison the well for the next guy. He'd make a good terrorist in Aleppo. (They recently, literally, poisoned the water supply for Damascus.) Obama's doing more for setting things back in his last 60 days than in his first 600.

josh

Your deep concern for Trump is once again noted.

6079_Smith_W

ikosmos wrote:

Obama: A small room the size of a shoebox with hand-selected journalists that even have their names on the back of their seats ...

versus

Putin: ... holding court with over 1,400 journalists firing questions at him for hours [four hours, fyi] on end, and he is answering them on the fly ...

You can't simply attribute this to "subservience to the "real" rulers". These guys are in a different class. And the difference puts Obama in a bad light. He's a lightweight.

Without getting into the magic of big theatre, here is another take on that event:

http://www.nybooks.com/daily/2016/12/28/most-powerful-men-in-the-world-t...

It is worth reading in its entirety. One excerpt doesn't do it justice, but ...

Quote:

Putin views Trump’s victory as the triumph of a particular world view: “a large number of Americans share our ideas of what the world should be like” and even of “right and wrong.” The phrase “traditional values” is crucial here: the instrumentalization of some vague idea of past greatness is something Putin and Trump share. Putin is no more likely a proponent of “traditional values” than is Trump: the Russian president is divorced and has long—long before his divorce—been rumored to be romantically involved with a gymnast-turned-politician, with whom he may or may not have children. The story of the affair originated in Putin’s hand-picked press pool, which consists of one journalist—like the story of Putin’s pivotal role in the American election, it may or may not be true but it is what he wants people to believe. Putin’s attitude toward women is remarkably similar to Trump’s. The Russian president once expressed admiration for former Israeli president Moshe Katsav, a convicted rapist. “What a powerful man he turned out to be!” Putin said in 2006. “He raped ten women! I never would have expected that from him! He surprised us all! We are all envious!”

In the last few years, the Kremlin has framed the battle for global domination as a conflict between a “Western civilization” rooted in the idea of human rights and a “traditional values civilization.” Putin’s “traditional values” campaign has included a virulent antigay offensive, an insistent effort to raise the birth rate in order to save the 145-million Russian nation from extinction, and, most important, a systematic discrediting of any idea that is viewed as connected with contemporary Western culture. This is where Putin sees a kindred spirit in Trump, with his flailing against political correctness and his defense of Christmas against a fictitious threat. “Traditional values” becomes a catchall term for an imaginary past—which goes a long way toward explaining Trump’s seamless symbiosis with the American Christian Right.

 

NDPP

What shite. Reminds me of your old Kiev Post treasures Smith. Surely this more properly belongs in the Russophobia section?

josh

I think Reagan would rejoice in the victory of his party and would be happy for the newly elected president, who had a fine understanding of societal mood and worked in that paradigm 

 

Trump, Zombie Reagan and Putin in a loving embrace.  Too bad that "fine understanding" left Trump down 3 million votes to his opponent.

6079_Smith_W

NDPP wrote:

What shite. Reminds me of your old Kiev Post treasures Smith. Surely this more properly belongs in the Russophobia section?

Well the author does leave out Putin promising to take on the Illuminati, but as for framing it as a culture war, including stooping to homophobia, it is exactly right. 

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/world/europe/russian-embassy-uk-mock-e...

Unlike some of the things posted here, I didn't make this up.

 

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