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ikosmos ikosmos's picture

I don't want to jinx things or anything, but Russians must be really proud of the efforts of their Foreign Ministry and such. The tenuous, negotiated peace in Syria will cause neo con heads to explode.

Couldn't happen to a nicer bunch of war-loving, chicken-hawk zombies.

What do we see? A petulant, out-going, lame duck US President going out with all the spite of a Saruman. And his Wormtongues positively frothing. Meanwhile, the Russian President is going from strength to strength,  his extremely impressive FM, Sergei Lavrov, doggedly fighting for peace like some modern day Maxim Litvinov, shrugging off attempts to derail the peace process - like the brutal murder of a key Ambassador - and winning the day.

Hurray for Russia, for [maybe] saving the world. Again.

josh

When Russia comes up, do you wear knee pads or no knee pads?

6079_Smith_W

Litvinov? Interesting that you should mention him, considering the history and all.

 

josh

The Obama administration on Thursday announced a slate of economic sanctions against Russia in retaliation for a widespread hacking campaign geared at interfering in the U.S. presidential election. The sanctions target two of Russia's main intelligence organizations, as well as six individuals implicated in the campaign. Both the Federal Security Service (FSB), the main successor to the KGB, and the GRU, Russia's military intelligence operation, were targeted. "All Americans should be alarmed by Russia's actions," Obama said in a statement, adding that the hacks "could only have been directed by the highest levels of the Russian government." 

 

http://thehill.com/policy/national-security/312119-us-announces-sanction...

josh

 Jake TapperVerified account ‏@jaketapper 3m3 minutes agoPresident Obama has given 35 Russian operatives 72 hours to leave the country & is shutting down two Russian compounds in Maryland/NY 

 

 

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

More spite from the Obama regime. This time a few dozen diplomats kicked out.

I've put a link in the New Russophobia thread. Where it belongs.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

josh wrote:
When Russia comes up, do you wear knee pads or no knee pads?

Sexual slander and defamation of character noted.  You guys really can't take it when someone says something nice about Russia, huh?

just imagine if I had made similar remarks about one of the Russophobes here. I'd never hear the end of it. Let's see how the mod(s) handle this.  Should be amusing.

yippie kay yay

 

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

6079_Smith_W wrote:
Litvinov? Interesting that you should mention him, considering the history and all.

I guess I watched Mission to Moscow (1943) too many times. lol. Sorry if you took that remark as a back-handed compliment to Stalin.

It wasn't.

oldgoat

Josh, re: post 202.  Really?  You can do better. How 'bout not getting quite so personal.  I actually have opinions on all of this, but I think I'll stick to refereeing. 

6079_Smith_W

It will probably get called for the slur that it is ikosmos. No need to jump for joy about it.

Contrary to what you might think, no one here rubs their hands with glee when you get called on stuff. We just want you to refrain from doing it.

(edit)

No, I didn't take it as that.Stalin should have kept more good people like him around, IMO.

I was thinking more of the fact that despite his being a great diplomat, they had no problem getting rid of him because he was Jewish and therefore was an embarrassment who stood in the way of a deal with the Nazis.

Had he remained in his position, who knows? Perhaps there would have been no slaughter at Stalingrad.

 

 

josh

ikosmos wrote:

josh wrote:
When Russia comes up, do you wear knee pads or no knee pads?

Sexual slander and defamation of character noted.  You guys really can't take it when someone says something nice about Russia, huh?

 

Not a matter of saying something nice. But I don't think I've seen such impressive cheerleading since college.

josh

oldgoat wrote:

Josh, re: post 202.  Really?  You can do better. How 'bout not getting quite so personal.  I actually have opinions on all of this, but I think I'll stick to refereeing. 

Yeah, I know. Just couldn't resist. Mea culpa.

Boze

I do not understand the Russophobes or the people who attack those who call out Russophobia.

Barack Obama's decision to expel 35 Russian diplomats is perhaps best described as "idiotic." 

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

It's worse than that Boze.

President-elect Donald Trump has taken the (past) advice of the First Lady, Michelle Obama, and taken the high road, complimenting the Russian President on his restraint, and aplomb, and so on, (Putin did not react to the expulsions but, instead, gritted his teeth and wished all the American diplomatic staff in Moscow, etc., a Happy New Year, blah blah) and ground whatever's left of Barak Obama's reputation into the dirt.

I mean, this is like a hat trick of "own goals" by Obama. He's done like dinner.

swallow swallow's picture

Boze wrote:

Barack Obama's decision to expel 35 Russian diplomats is perhaps best described as "idiotic." 

It is indeed. He looks petulant going out, when he could have aimed for what the media would have called "statesmanlike." And unlike environmental rpeervation orders, expelling Russian diplomats achieves nothing. 

Doug Woodard

Russia: Talking war in times of economic crisis:

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2016/12/russia-talking-war-tim...

 

Doug Woodard

Russia has fiscal balance in sight with oil at $50 per barrel:

http://oilprice.com/Energy/Oil-Prices/Back-to-Black-at-50-Oil-Russia-Cou...

 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Doug Woodard wrote:

Russia: Talking war in times of economic crisis:

http://www.aljazeera.com/indepth/features/2016/12/russia-talking-war-tim...

 

This article claims that the Russian military budget for 2017 is 43b or 4.7% of GDP.  That is definitely imperial sabre rattling at an epic scale.

Quote:

While the government has sought to alleviate social fears, it also has made it clear that defence is a priority and that it is dedicating a solid chunk of that budget to ensure the modernisation of the military.

In the 2017 budget, it allocated $43bn, 4.7 percent of Russia's GDP, to the defence sector - what some analysts have called "record spending" for a country currently not at war.

Vladimir Putin, himself, has spoken repeatedly on the importance of the military. In late December he warned that Russia is currently stronger than any "potential aggressor", but that it only takes a slip in "modernisation of the army and the fleet or in its preparation for this to change".

This type of alarmist rhetoric is not only effective in justifying the defence budget to the general public but it is also distracting attention away from the economic crisis.

Of course that depends on who you compare them to . The U.S. military budget is $773.5 billion in 2017.

https://www.thebalance.com/u-s-military-budget-components-challenges-gro...

Top five countries by military expenditure in 2015.
According to the Stockholm International Peace Research Institute.[1]

 

NorthReport

Angela Merkel, Russia’s Next Target

We have seen all of this before, employed by the K.G.B. and the East German Stasi: psychological warfare, rumor-mongering, schemes to bribe politicians and then expose them as criminals. They used it both internally, against dissidents, and externally, against Western enemies. Mr. Putin and his former K.G.B. colleagues should know that, this time, we have a better sense of their dirty tricks, and how they have updated Zersetzung for the internet.

The government has its role to play, but so do journalists and civil-society groups. We journalists will put pressure on companies like Facebook and Twitter to be vigilant against fake news; we will expose the patterns of Russian agitprop where we see them.

But it is just as important to be clear about the ideology driving these attacks. In September, my newspaper, Die Zeit, joined with the broadcaster ZDF to reveal details of Moscow’s highly sophisticated disinformation campaign. We had gained access to roughly 10,000 emails that showed how ideologues close to the Putin administration advised the pro-Russian rebel government in Eastern Ukraine.

Among the emails was a document that set “thematic guidelines” which rebel-allied media outlets had to follow — if necessary by distorting facts and faking news. “Today’s Russia is no longer the Russia of the 1990s, but is working unwaveringly to re-establish the strength of the Soviet Union. Today’s Russia is on an equal footing with the West,” it read. “A global diplomatic war is underway. But the West is also suffering in this war, and it is still unclear who will prevail.”

No doubt similar marching orders have been given to the armies of hackers who were sent to attack the Democrats, and who are now plotting attacks on Germany. It is quite clear who will lose. Mr. Putin and his reckless fakers should be aware that the only thing they will harvest from this mendacity is another lost generation of Russians who could serve their country better by being given the opportunity for honest and constructive intellectual challenges. A government that maligns the outside world to make feel Russia great again is doomed to fail — as it failed before.


https://www.nytimes.com/2017/01/01/opinion/angela-merkel-russias-next-ta...

NDPP

The Utter Stupidity of the New Cold War

http://www.counterpunch.org/2017/01/10/the-utter-stupidity-of-the-new-co...

"It is sad and disturbing that so many progressive people are so willing to jump on the new Cold War bandwagon. It is as though they have learned nothing from history..."

 

Loud & Clear: Abby Martin on Anti-Russia Intel Report (podcast)

http://sptnkne.ws/dmBK

"Audaciously Ridiculous!'

NDPP

Russia Boosts Anti-Missile Shield Over Crimea with S-400 System

https://on.rt.com/809b

"A new battery of S-400 long-range surfact-to-air missiles has been fully deployed in Russia's Crimea."

NDPP

dp

NorthReport

Bizarre Glitches Have Some Convinced Russia Is Hacking U.S. Media

http://www.huffingtonpost.ca/2017/01/13/c-span-russia-today-msnbc-pompeo...

NorthReport

U.S. Intelligence Officials Reportedly Warn Israeli Counterparts Against Sharing Info With Trump Administration

Shared information could be leaked to Russia and onward to Iran, American officials implied to Israelis in closed meeting, saying Kremlin has 'leverages of pressure' over Trump 

http://www.haaretz.com/israel-news/1.764711

Michael Moriarity Michael Moriarity's picture

ikosmos wrote:
Russian President's year-end (FOUR hours long*, extemporaneous) press conference.

Never mind the content, which is fascinating. Just the fact that the Russian President does this, over and over again, is impressive. What Western leader does this? I mean, hours of off-the-cuff, detailed, sometimes humorous, answers to all and every question thrown at him.

I just ran across another take on Putin's press conferences, by a Russian journalist. The piece is in the form of advice to U.S. journalists who are about to face 4 years of interactions with an authoritarian leader rather like Putin. This is the introduction, but I think the whole thing is worth reading.

Alexey Kovalev wrote:
Congratulations, US media! You’ve just covered your first press conference of an authoritarian leader with a massive ego and a deep disdain for your trade and everything you hold dear. We in Russia have been doing it for 12 years now — with a short hiatus when our leader wasn’t technically our leader — so quite a few things during Donald Trump’s press conference rang a bell. Not just mine, in fact — read this excellent round-up in The Moscow Times.

Vladimir Putin’s annual pressers are supposed to be the media event of the year. They are normally held in late December, around Western Christmas time (we Orthodox Christians celebrate Christmas two weeks later and it’s not a big deal, unlike New Year’s Eve). Which probably explains why Putin’s pressers don’t get much coverage outside of Russia, except in a relatively narrow niche of Russia-watchers. Putin’s pressers are televised live across all Russian TV channels, attended by all kinds of media — federal news agencies, small local publications and foreign reporters based in Moscow — and are supposed to overshadow every other event in Russia or abroad.

These things are carefully choreographed, typically last no less than four hours, and Putin always comes off as an omniscient and benevolent leader tending to a flock of unruly but adoring children. Given that Putin is probably a role model for Trump, it’s no surprise that he’s apparently taking a page from Putin’s playbook. I have some observations to share with my American colleagues. You’re in this for at least another four years, and you’ll be dealing with things Russian journalists have endured for almost two decades now. I’m talking about Putin here, but see if you can apply any of the below to your own leader.

 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Great little piece.  It sounds like Putin uses every trick in the book while most Western leaders use a slightly smaller palette of hues to distort the truth. What I don't understand is why Putin hasn't had this journalist arrested or murdered yet? 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

ikosmos wrote:

See how easy that is? And what's a name like kropotkin anyway? Sounds Russian to me.

"Round up the usual Russian suspects."

I'm a Prince of a fellow so I get the royal exemption.

sherpa-finn

Dream on. Even Princess Anastasia didn't get an exemption. 

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Great little piece.  It sounds like Putin uses every trick in the book while most Western leaders use a slightly smaller palette of hues to distort the truth. What I don't understand is why Putin hasn't had this journalist arrested or murdered yet? 

Hilarity. Unfortunately, there are a number of Russian journalists - such as Anna Politkovskaya - who are no longer able to be tickled by your puckish sense of humour.

Kovalev probably won't die for his open letter, but I wouldn't put money on his odds if he started a serious investigation into the affairs of Putin or his cronies. Russian journalists are murdered at an alarming rate.

Here's further to how Russian jounalists are looking at the US right now:

https://themoscowtimes.com/articles/you-thought-this-was-rock-bottom-ame...

Quote:

A more bittersweet comedy captured the fact that American journalists can afford to offend the commander-in-chief, without risking the dismantling of their publication. Russian journalists don’t have this luxury, and staff who have worked at independent Russian news outlets like Dozhd, Lenta.ru, RBC, and others know all too well that falling afoul of the Kremlin means you could lose your broadcasting contracts, your office lease, or your chief editors.

For a laugh, some Russian Twitter users joked about a world where Russia’s harsh media landscape extended to the United States.

6079_Smith_W

ikosmos wrote:

In fact, the mental illness even has a name. Russophrenia.

Well if we are going to use real and serious illnesses and turn them into pop psych memes we shouldn't forget to mention Russoflatulence.

 

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

Don't forget sticky keyboard syndrome. Seems to happen whenever Russia or Vlad Putin are the subects of discussion (if you can call it that).

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

kropotkin1951 wrote:
Great little piece.  It sounds like Putin uses every trick in the book while most Western leaders use a slightly smaller palette of hues to distort the truth. What I don't understand is why Putin hasn't had this journalist arrested or murdered yet? 

Well, think of the Russophobic meme in which Russia is about to collapse AND take over the world and establish an Orthodox dictatorship. The two ideas contradict each other, but no matter. For Russophobes, anything is OK.

In fact, the mental illness even has a name. Russophrenia.

So, Putin is both an authoritarian despot AND too bumbling to dispatch his enemies.

See how easy that is? And what's a name like kropotkin anyway? Sounds Russian to me.

"Round up the usual Russian suspects."

[spelling correction Jan 18]

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

sherpa-finn wrote:
Dream on. Even Princess Anastasia didn't get an exemption.

Right. And the current government has a direct link to the Provisional one that executed the Romanoffs, therefore this is relevant. 

Are you one of those people who think all Germans are Nazis? Or does this sort of unrelenting bigotry just apply to Russians?

Inquiring minds want to know. 

Sean in Ottawa

ikosmos wrote:

sherpa-finn wrote:
Dream on. Even Princess Anastasia didn't get an exemption.

Right. And the current government has a direct link to the Provisional one that executed the Romanoffs, therefore this is relevant. 

Are you one of those people who think all Germans are Nazis? Or does this sort of unrelenting bigotry just apply to Russians?

Inquiring minds want to know. 

This is fair. I think those who say that Russia is not left anymore and does not deserve extra sympathy for having once been communist must also not connect the present Russian government to previous government including precommunist ones for the purpose of a negative comment either.

 

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Sean in Ottawa wrote:
This is fair. I think those who say that Russia is not left anymore and does not deserve extra sympathy for having once been communist must also not connect the present Russian government to previous government including precommunist ones for the purpose of a negative comment either.

This is a clumsy way of putting things but I think we agree. I would add some detail and just note that you could have a grey area.

For example, in many European countries after WW2, every single political party was discredited by their cooperation with the Nazis ... except the Communists. And that made things much easier for the Communists to have post-1945 political successes in those same countries. I'm thinking mainly of eastern Europe (but not only). And I would say that those political parties discredited by collaboration with the Nazis deserve all the opprobrium they got after 1945. I think the US Marshall Plan was a measure - in part - designed to address that "problem" for the non-Communists.

 

In any case, Babbler kropotkin was making a joke by calling himself a Prince ... like the historical figure he's named himself after. I presume most babblers know that.

6079_Smith_W

ikosmos wrote:

For example, in many European countries after WW2, every single political party was discredited by their cooperation with the Nazis ... except the Communists. And that made things much easier for the Communists to have post-1945 political successes in those same countries.

Not sure what you mean there, ikosmos.

Do you mean to say they didn't collaborate? Because if you look at the political cartoons of the time they were the ones being most roundly mocked for it, while most western powers downplayed their own actions.

And afterwards I'd say they had a rougher time of it because they were communist in a cold war reality. And that was the result of factors on both side of that divide. Not to mention that that divide didn't start in 1945.

Bottom line is they had political baggage just  as everyone else did, even if they didn't want to admit it. The only difference I see is that they had a harder time than some other organizations, but it had virtually nothing to do with Nazism, it was because of anti-communism. It was only the Soviet propaganda of the time which claimed that everyone else was in league with the Nazis but them.

But anyway, if you agree that these countries aren't the same now as they were 70 years and stop talking about the glory days, I won't complain.

 

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Babbler bagkitty posted a story from [foreign-owned by IMG/Dutch businessman Derk Sauer] Moscow News in the Russophobia thread so I am taking the liberty of putting the story here (where, I think it belongs). 

Last fall, a conservative Parliamentarian in the Russian Duma proposed some legislation on de-criminalizing domestic violence, or so it is claimed. The Russian government rejected the legislation. This was reported in the same Moscow News but somehow missed by our intrepid babbler bagkitty. lol.

Anyway, this is no laughing matter. The same conservative legislator has brought a similar bill forward and got First Reading just this week.

Let's see where it goes and keep on top of this. Maybe hold off from sending in the US tanks to "liberate" Russian women from the Putin regime for the nonce.

Russian Government Rejects Bill Decriminalizing Domestic Violence

Sean in Ottawa

ikosmos wrote:

Babbler bagkitty posted a story from [foreign-owned by IMG/Dutch businessman Derk Sauer] Moscow News in the Russophobia thread so I am taking the liberty of putting the story here (where, I think it belongs). 

Last fall, a conservative Parliamentarian in the Russian Duma proposed some legislation on de-criminalizing domestic violence, or so it is claimed. The Russian government rejected the legislation. This was reported in the same Moscow News but somehow missed by our intrepid babbler bagkitty. lol.

Anyway, this is no laughing matter. The same conservative legislator has brought a similar bill forward and got First Reading just this week.

Let's see where it goes and keep on top of this. Maybe hold off from sending in the US tanks to "liberate" Russian women from the Putin regime for the nonce.

Russian Government Rejects Bill Decriminalizing Domestic Violence

Please complete this post by saying who here (or anywhere) advocated sending tanks to "liberate" Russian women. Please be specific about where your quotation "liberate" came from.

I think you should stop with the straw men -- this is getting to be a serious fire hazard.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

I thought you would get the point without having it spelled out for you. Oh well.

Quote:
When the U.S. began bombing Afghanistan on 7 October 2001, the oppression of Afghan women was used as a justification to overthrow the Taliban regime. Five weeks later the US First Lady, Laura Bush, stated triumphantly: 'Because of our recent military gains in much of Afghanistan, women are no longer imprisoned in their homes... The fight against terrorism is also a fight for the rights and dignity of women.' But in a detailed report released on 6 October 2003 Amnesty International had a rather different picture to paint: 'Two years after the ending of the Taliban regime the international community and the Afghan Transitional Administration, led by President Hamid Karzai, have proved unable to protect women.

I just wanted to get ahead of any promotion of the "liberation" of Russian women by "the freedom loving NATO regimes" . Cheers.

The Betrayal of Afghan Women by NATO barbarians.

 

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

It doesn't matter that a bill decriminalizing domestic battery failed in October anymore. A bill decriminalizing domestic battery has passed now.

Russia took the first step to allowing men to beat their wives and children without consequence.

This is a fact. Excusing or rationalizing that fact on this board is contrary to policy. Of course, we'll understand if you don't want to discuss it further, and that understanding this fact causes great cognitive dissonance for you. Perhaps you and your sticky keyboard should just start a thread on how dreamy ol' Vlad is, in a Stanley Kowalski kind of way.

You should also post your comments about NATO in a thread about NATO. It's my understanding that the purpose of this thread is to discuss the many fascinating aspects of Russia.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Timebandit wrote:
A bill decriminalizing domestic battery has passed now. ... This is a fact.

AFAIK, this is a lie. It passed First Reading. That's it.

Where's your proof? In your dirty underwear? Can we not see it due to "National Security" ?

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

Read the whole post, Stella. First step. The Russian government is in the process of decriminalizing wife-beating. Real wife-beating, not your heavy-breathing, sticky keyboard Vlad fantasies. Real women and children are at risk while you rationalize and defend domestic abuse.

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

lol. Keep moving those goal posts, you genius. I bow to your great skill with a deck of cards and some quick chatter.

It only show what a profound thinker you are, how you are so skillful at refuting this Putin-bot, like George slaying the dragon, and your farts don't smell, and so on.

It's interesting that none of you winners has pointed out the obvious. While Sweden criminalized corporal punishment of children in 1979,  the Canadian regime has never done so. We have a loophole for all those conservatives who think it's good to physically punish their children.

Real children are at risk while you drop your stinky load on Vlad the Merciless. Canadian children.

What a lot of stinking hypocrites.

 

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

Well, well, well. I really better bone up on my Lenin.

The myth of "Russian imperialism": In defense of Lenin's analysis

A quite lengthy piece in which the authors, painstakingly, go through Lenin's basic arguments and then apply this approach, as well as some new concepts, to Russia and show that, no, Russia is NOT an imperialist country in any seriously, meaningful sense.

Worth a careful read. Warning: Russophobes, you have no need to read this. You know everything already. lol.

R Annis & R Clarke wrote:
Conclusion ...

Russia is not home to an advanced capitalism, or to a broad, prosperous middle class. Its monopolies tend to be puny alongside those of various countries that are clearly part of the semi-periphery, let alone the corporate monsters of the imperialist centre. Russian industrial production has lost much of its past diversity, and its overall technical level is decidedly backward, while in a pattern reminiscent of the least developed areas of the periphery, the extractive sector accounts for a notably large share of output. Russia’s foreign trade has a markedly dependent character, and the country exports mainly basic commodities for which prices are often depressed. Conducting little trade with poorer areas of the periphery, Russia does not benefit significantly from unequal trading exchange. There is no overall surplus of capital in Russia, and while the country nonetheless exports capital, this is for perverse reasons and despite a near-catastrophic lack of investment in infrastructure and productive plant.

With its real foreign investment concentrated in countries of the centre, Russia plays little direct part in the quintessential imperialist activity – the export of capital to the periphery and the extraction of profit from developing-country labour and resources. Russia’s finance capital is small and weak, and the largely criminalised, chaotic nature of the Russian financial sector rules out any possibility that this sector might play a hegemonic role within the economy.

No possible doubt can remain here: in the terms that Lenin defined, present-day Russia is not an imperialist power.

The authors point out the political importance of getting this right.

Quote:
if we reject a materialist analysis, we lose the ability to distinguish between the global hegemons and their victims. In crucial conflicts, we find ourselves displaying a myopic even-handedness that damns the mugged along with the muggers. In these circumstances, international resistance to imperialist violence is confused and blunted. The victims are denied our solidarity. From being opponents of imperialism, we are transformed into something close to its accomplices.

Yup. I've seen that once or twice.

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

ikosmos wrote:

lol. Keep moving those goal posts, you genius. I bow to your great skill with a deck of cards and some quick chatter.

It only show what a profound thinker you are, how you are so skillful at refuting this Putin-bot, like George slaying the dragon, and your farts don't smell, and so on.

It's interesting that none of you winners has pointed out the obvious. While Sweden criminalized corporal punishment of children in 1979,  the Canadian regime has never done so. We have a loophole for all those conservatives who think it's good to physically punish their children.

Real children are at risk while you drop your stinky load on Vlad the Merciless. Canadian children.

What a lot of stinking hypocrites.

 


We aren't talking about Sweden or Canada, we're talking about Russia - a country where it appears it will soon be legal to smack the wife and kids around at least once a year. Your failure to read carefully does not equate to moved goalposts, but your frantic attempts to draw the discussion to other countries speaks volumes.

Sean in Ottawa

ikosmos wrote:

I just wanted to get ahead of ....

Thanks for clarifying that your post was just a made up load of BS without any basis at all for attacking people here.

Sean in Ottawa

ikosmos wrote:

Timebandit wrote:
A bill decriminalizing domestic battery has passed now. ... This is a fact.

AFAIK, this is a lie. It passed First Reading. That's it.

Where's your proof? In your dirty underwear? Can we not see it due to "National Security" ?

That is a pretty offensive post.

****

"A bill aimed at decriminalising domestic violence to preserve the “tradition of parental authority” has easily passed through the first stage of approval in the Russian parliament.

....

The proposed law was approved by 368 MPs, with only one coming out in opposition."

ikosmos ikosmos's picture

What a bunch of obtuse jackassess. AFAIK, the Russian Duma is the same as the Canadian Parliament. First Reading doesn't mean shit.

Meanwhile, Sweden long ago left behind the Canadian barbarians when it comes to the rights of children.

Fukin' losers. All you have is foaming, rabid Russophobia.

 

That's all you got.

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

This is about RUSSIA. You statred the thread. You made it about Russia, let's talk about Russia. After all, it's your very favouritest subject.

A first reading with massive support has an excellent chance of passing. And all but one of RUSSIA'S federal representatives voted to support BEATING WOMEN AND CHILDREN WITHOUT CONSEQUENCES.

There's your admirable regime, ikosmos. Men who approve of men slapping women around. It doesn't matter what Sweden or Canada does. Or if it does, let's have a thread about it. But this? This is ALL on RUSSIA. And this is the Russia thread. Because you set it up that way, ikosmos. We're just playing along.

Sean in Ottawa

ikosmos wrote:

What a bunch of obtuse jackassess. AFAIK, the Russian Duma is the same as the Canadian Parliament. First Reading doesn't mean shit.

Meanwhile, Sweden long ago left behind the Canadian barbarians when it comes to the rights of children.

Fukin' losers. All you have is foaming, rabid Russophobia.

 

That's all you got.

Ok - bold or not -- who are you calling a jackass? Because if you are implying that I am, I am happy to take the compliment from you and return it in kind.

If we had a vote pass first reading in Canada in our parliament by 337-1  -- you would find that not a big deal?

I would say that would give a pretty good indication of where parliament was on the issue. If it was a question of outlook, I would consider that we had a pretty informative result -- even if it would still go through the remaining process to become law later.

So you decided to make this comparison -- so if a bill passes first reading 137-1 -- exactly what would you say its pronosis is for passage? A really long shot????

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