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montrealer58 montrealer58's picture

Fanning Fear of the SNP and Ukip were the tickets to a Tory majority in England. The vile Grant Shapps calculated correctly.

NDPP

The Artist Taxi-Driver: GE 2015: Live From Westmonster OMG!!!

https://youtu.be/UkM1IxqjSXM

 

UK Election 2015: The Horror

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article41788.htm

"English voters chose to reward one of the most vicious rightwing governments in British history with a near majority. It's a result that was made possible by a sheeplike, frightened and rancorous population that appears increasingly disposed to believe all the lies that it is told by its vile newspapers.

It is an irrational, stupid and fearful vote by an electorate that doesn't even recognize its own self-interest, let alone the interests of others..."

Welcome to the nightmare. I predict much the same will happen here...

montrealer58 montrealer58's picture

NDPP wrote:

The Artist Taxi-Driver: GE 2015: Live From Westmonster OMG!!!

https://youtu.be/UkM1IxqjSXM

 

UK Election 2015: The Horror

http://www.informationclearinghouse.info/article41788.htm

"English voters chose to reward one of the most vicious rightwing governments in British history with a near majority. It's a result that was made possible by a sheeplike, frightened and rancorous population that appears increasingly disposed to believe all the lies that it is told by its vile newspapers.

It is an irrational, stupid and fearful vote by an electorate that doesn't even recognize its own self-interest, let alone the interests of others..."

Welcome to the nightmare. I predict much the same will happen here...

Completely over-the top rhetoric. Apalling.

abnormal

Hardly an unbiased sample of reasons people gave for voting the way they did but it's worth reading

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/politics/generalelection/one-reddit...

The full thread is here

http://www.reddit.com/r/unitedkingdom/comments/359uz4/people_who_voted_t...

 

josh

Burnham and Cooper, i.e.,, Mrs. Balls, leaders to replace Milliband.

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/may/08/andy-burnham-favourite-t...

abnormal

NDPP wrote:
"English voters chose to reward one of the most vicious rightwing governments in British history with a near majority. It's a result that was made possible by a sheeplike, frightened and rancorous population that appears increasingly disposed to believe all the lies that it is told by its vile newspapers.

It is an irrational, stupid and fearful vote by an electorate that doesn't even recognize its own self-interest, let alone the interests of others..."

That's the problem with democracies.  Sometimes people have different ideas about what's good for them than you do.  They may be wrong but it's pretty condescending to call them stupid just because they don't agree with you.

abnormal

As a tagalong, from the Notebooks of Lazarus Long

Quote:
Democracy is based on the assumption that a million men are wiser than one man. How’s that again? I missed something.

Autocracy is based on the assumption that one man is wiser than a million men. Let’s play that over again, too. Who decides?

Pretty easy to see that someone that's calling the voters "stupid" because he clearly knows better than they do has the answer to that last question.

montrealer58 montrealer58's picture

As they serve their Russian and Ukranian totalitarian masters, they show complete contempt for the democratic will of the British people. We can be assured that they hold an equal contempt for our democratic will here in Canada as well.

abnormal

montrealer58 wrote:

As they serve their Russian and Ukranian totalitarian masters, they show complete contempt for the democratic will of the British people. We can be assured that they hold an equal contempt for our democratic will here in Canada as well.

So you're claiming that the result of the vote didn't reflect the "democratic will of the British people"?  Or are you claiming that you know better than any number of million voters.  Enquiring minds want to know.

montrealer58 montrealer58's picture

I guess what I meant was lost in context. The servers of the Russian and Ukranian totalitarians have contempt for the democratic result in the UK. These same servants would also have contempt for the Canadian democratic will as well. This is evidenced by their wish to project the competing agendas of the Russian and Ukranian totalitarians onto Canadian soil.

And when people are denied the right to democratic government in Russia and the Ukraine because of said totalitarianism, supporters of said totalitarians really have little to say about the outcome of democratic elections in other parts of the world.

Slumberjack

Maybe there's a grain of sense in this after all, in that, voters may have reasoned that the quicker it all goes down the flush bowl the better, and there's no one better to yank that chain than the conservatives.

josh

Looks like Cameron is pushing his version of C-51

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-32714802

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

What we learned from occupying our university

It is less than a week into the new government and some of us would love nothing more than to run screaming for the hills. Yet, amid this bleak political landscape, students have been occupying their universities.

Over the last six weeks we occupied the London School of Economics. Our demands concerned issues of free education, workers’ rights, university democracy, divestment and liberation on campus.

Nine of our demands were met, after five hours of negotiations with the vice-chancellor. The occupation ended on the night of 30 April on agreed terms that these demands will be followed through....

http://www.theguardian.com/education/2015/may/13/what-we-learned-from-oc...

“We have shown that occupations work and that students must articulate themselves.” Photograph: Natalie Fiennes

NorthReport

Is Labour done?

It was obvious even before the election began that Labour was going to crash and burn. Politically they had a useless leader with a useless program.

SNP will form the real opposition to the Tories, says Angus Robertson

Party figure says Labour is struggling with leadership in Westminster and Scotland and offers no alternative to the Conservatives

 

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/may/17/snp-will-form-the-real-o...

NDPP

Ex MP George Galloway's Comment: 'How Can the Tories with Only 37% Support Stop UK Poverty?' (and vid)

http://www.presstv.com/Video/2015/05/15/411169/UN-Yemen-humanitarian-crisis

montrealer58 montrealer58's picture

This is how the UK Parliament would look like under PR:

Tory: 240

Labour 222

UKIP 82

Lib-Dems 51

SNP 31

 

iyraste1313

We need an alliance of all radical forces to build an anti-capitalist movement in England. A movement that is both new but also prepared to search the past for help: the Grand Remonstrance of the 17th century, the Chartist rebellions of the 19th century, the more recent developments in South America, Greece and Spain also offer a way forward. As for the Labour Party, I think we should let it bleed. Here the Scottish route offers hope.

Tariq Ali in Counterpunch.org

re the sweep of the Scottish national Party!

NorthReport

Blundering Tony Blair quits as Middle East peace envoy – only Israel will miss him

For Arabs – and for Britons who lost their loved ones in his shambolic war in Iraq – Blair’s appointment was an insult

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/voices/comment/blundering-tony-blair-quits-...

NorthReport

 

The guy's a Conservative  Laughing

Nick Robinson: Labour asked me to be Ed Miliband's spin doctor

Senior party figure made extraordinary approach after concerns about opposition leader’s ‘presentational difficulties’, says BBC political editor

 

http://www.theguardian.com/media/2015/may/31/nick-robinson-labour-ed-mil...

Doug Woodard

Winner-takes-all electoral systems are 'artificially dividing the UK':

http://gu.com/p/49bkk/sbl

 

Doug Woodard

British municipal outsourcing:

http://gu.com/p/49d5j/sbl

I'm sure that some Canadian right-wingers will admire this example.

josh
jerrym

The following article discusses what the effects of the budget plan for the UK have been during the last four years and will be during the next four years under Cameron's Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne. Of course, none of this would be going ahead if Cameron didn't approve it. The article takes the perspective of how the UK will look in 2019 after four more years under the proposed budget plan.

Quote:

So what does Britain look like in these circumstances? In terms of the size of the state, it is like the Britain of the 1930s. Public spending has fallen to below 35%, lower than the postwar low under Macmillan in the late 1950s and back to the pre-welfare-state years when Neville Chamberlain was starting a rearmament programme. Osborne is offering a return to the world of Ukip’s dreams without the need to vote for Nigel Farage.

Here’s what it means. Public spending on services, administration and grants by central government account for just 12.6% of national output compared to 21.2% of GDP in the last year of Gordon Brown’s Labour government. Put another way, spending on public services per head is down from £5,650 to £3,880. Around 40% of that reduction in spending took place between 2010 and 2015; the other 60% came after 2015.

http://www.theguardian.com/uk-news/2014/dec/03/osborne-plans-public-spen...

Cameron did what he had to do to survive in a coalition government - compromise - but even before the 2015 election victory this was his announced plan. He is taking a chain saw to government spending, refusing to take Mediterranean migrants, and threatening to pull out of the EU via a referendum, partly because he sees its human rights obligations as too onerous for a right-winger like himself. Just because his platform does not fit the extreme positions of the UKIP agenda or that of the ultra-right part of the Conservative party because it likely would have cost him more moderate right-wing votes than those gained by out-UKIPing UKIP, doesn't mean Cameron is not even more right-wing than Thatcher.

ETA: His approach typifies what one would expect of a son of a stockbroker and a lineal descendent of King William IV. He grew up in a privileged environment including an Oxford education that provided Cameron with good debating skills, but no ability and no willingness to look beyond the narrow interests of his elite class (unlike some in his class with his education). It is not surprising therefore that his viewpoint matches so closely that of his Chancellor of the Exchequer, George Osborne, a descendent of the Anglo-Irish aristocracy, whose upper class views of economic privlege were also reinforced by a narrow but privleged Oxford education.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/David_Cameron

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/G

bekayne
bekayne

bekayne wrote:

...

jerrym

Now that the Conservatives have a majority they fully intend to introduce the radical agenda taking spending down to the levels found during the Great Depression, a ten year period that was greatly extended by such policies. What else would you expect from the son of a stockbroker and the highest levels of aristocracy (he's a direct descendent of King Willianm IV)?

Quote:

David Cameron will use the Conservative Party’s first majority in the House of Commons for nearly 20 years to “deliver” on a radical agenda to cut welfare, shrink the size of the state and re-define Britain’s relationship with Europe.

Conservative insiders said Mr Cameron would move to the right to consolidate support among his backbench MPs after five years of compromise with the Liberal Democrats.

Among Mr Cameron’s first legislative priorities will be to enshrine an EU referendum into law, bring in the so-called ‘snoopers charter’ to give police greater powers to monitor internet communications and give English MPs a veto over legislation only affecting England.  The Tories also intend to publish plans to scrap the Human Rights Act within their first 100 days. All proposals had been previously blocked by the Lib Dems. ...

As well as deep welfare cuts The Independent understands that the Department of Business and the Department of Energy and Climate Change, previously run by the Lib Dems, will be among the biggest casualties in terms of spending reductions.

Oliver Letwin, the Tories' policy chief, has spent the campaign in Whitehall drawing up proposals to merge quangos and slash Government regulation. These are likely to form a key part of the spending review. The review has been made more difficult by Mr Cameron’s late and unexpected election pledge to find an extra £8bn for the NHS. This has yet to be funded and if the Tories stick to their other tax and spending commitments could require further cuts. Most senior Tories had expected to be negotiating another coalition agreement with the Liberal Democrats, giving them the flexibility to raise taxes to fund their additional spending commitments. As it is they are now bound to implement legislation binding the Government not to increase income tax, national insurance or VAT rates for the next five years.

Preparations will get under way in Whitehall to draw up comprehensive demands to be put to other European leaders to form the basis of a renegotiation of Britain’s EU membership. This is unlikely to be easy. Mr Cameron will have to tread a path between what the rest of Europe is prepared to concede in terms of migrant benefit restrictions and reclaiming powers from Brussels, and what is acceptable to his own Eurosceptics.

And Europe will not be the only issue where Mr Cameron will face problems from his own backbenchers. ....

Paradoxically, despite winning an overall majority, the Prime Minister is far more vulnerable to rebellions than he was in the last Parliament, when the combined strength of the Tory-Lib Dem coalition meant he enjoyed a stronger majority in the Commons.

Then the two parties had a combined majority in the Commons of 76 but now the Conservatives alone have a majority of just 12.

This will severely restrict his ability to introduce legislation that does not command the support of his entire Parliamentary party and make him uniquely vulnerable to rebellion.

jerrym

Cameron laid out the radical Conservative agenda that will dismantle most of what is left of the frayed social safety net in the Queen's Speech. One pundit called it the "most dangerous Queen's Speech in living memory".

 

Quote:

The Tories' slim majority of 12 will enable the party to pursue many of its manifesto policies, as well as some of the bills vetoed by its Coalition partner over the last five years.

Plans to cut welfare and limit strike action immediately highlighted the new government's "freedom from Lib Dem shackles", says Iain Watson, political correspondent for BBC News. But, politically, the Conservatives are focused on consolidating any ground taken from Labour, he says. Cameron borrowed the opposition's language of "one nation" and defied Ed Miliband's predictions that a Tory government would increase VAT and cut child benefit.

Nevertheless, if a Tory majority is maintained, Britain will be "transformed in ways which are likely to be controversial", says Watson. "The size of the state will reduce. Working age benefits will be less generous. The deficit will be eliminated. And, if successful, the idea of a 'Northern Powerhouse' will help re-balance the economy away from the south-east."

Stephen Pollard at the Daily Express describes it as a "huge and radical programme of change", while the Daily Telegraph's Mary Riddell says it may even go down as the "most dangerous Queen's Speech in living memory".

By the end of this parliament, Britain may have exited the EU and scrapped the Human Rights Act, she says. "Two such momentous issues require a deft government and a valiant opposition. Britain can rely on neither."

But George Eaton at New Statesman thinks the greatest danger is that the death of one union could lead to the death of another. "Were Scotland to vote to remain in the EU and the rest of the UK to vote to leave, the SNP would cite this as grounds for another independence referendum," he warns. "By the end of the parliament, should the Union fracture into two nations, [Cameron's] promise of 'one nation' could look like the bleakest of ironies."

Here's what else was announced in the Queen's Speech:

Employment

Measures on work were at the heart of the Tory's first legislative programme, with the employment bill set to be "fast-tracked" through parliament. This will push for two million more jobs and three million more apprenticeships over the next five years with the aim of achieving the highest employment rate of any major economy.

Security

The government is hoping to fast-track a new counter-terrorism bill that will impose greater restrictions on extremists trying to radicalise young people. Proposals include new powers to close premises, including mosques, where extremists are attempting to build influence. The controversial bill was previously vetoed by the Liberal Democrats but was revived in the Tory manifesto.

Government

Chancellor George Osborne has pledged to devolve greater powers to English cities if they agree to be governed by a directly elected mayor. The cities devolution bill is seen as a balance to the powers that Cameron has promised to the Scottish parliament and is expected to offer elected city mayors the opportunity to control health, transport, housing and planning.

Business

Cameron has named Thatcherite Sajid Javid as Business Secretary, with plans to cut red tape and boost exports. The Financial Times says the appointment is "emblematic of Mr Cameron's plan to lead a government with free market instincts allied to a series of measures to show the Conservatives are on the side of aspiring working families". Ministers have said they will push ahead with plans to make public sector striking illegal unless it is backed by at least 40 per cent of all workers entitled to vote on industrial action.

Welfare

To pay for the three million apprenticeships, the employment bill also plans to reduce the annual benefit cap from £26,000 to £23,000 per household. Returning as Work and Pensions Secretary, Iain Duncan Smith will oversee the implementation of the party's welfare plans.

Childcare

Another bill to be "fast-tracked" through parliament concerns childcare. The Tories want to double the amount of free childcare for working families with three and four year olds to 30 hours a week.

Europe

Cameron has promised that "early legislation" will be introduced to provide for an in/out referendum on the UK's European Union membership before the end of 2017. He has also pledged to "bring forward proposals" for a British Bill of Rights. More solid plans to scrap the Human Rights Act appear to have been put on hold following opposition from senior Tory MPs.

Tax

Cameron wants to introduce legislation to freeze income tax, rates, value-added tax and national insurance for the next five years. He will also try to raise the earnings threshold for income tax from £10,600 to £12,500 during this parliament and legislate for a permanent tax-free minimum wage for people working at least 30 hours a week.

Housing

The government looks likely to press ahead with plans to extend Margaret Thatcher's controversial right-to-buy scheme, which would allow housing association tenants to buy their homes with similar discounts offered to council tenants.

Health

Government will increase the health budget, integrate health and social care and ensure the "NHS works on a seven-day basis". Measures will also be introduced to improve access to GPs and to mental healthcare.

http://www.theweek.co.uk/election-2015/63629/queens-speech-whats-on-davi...

 

jerrym

One citizen's response to one aspect the Conservative agenda:

Quote:

I was appalled by David Cameron’s proposal to waive inheritance tax on properties worth up to £1m (Report, 13 April), and also by the way he portrayed paying tax as akin to being robbed (“the taxman will not get his hands on it”). Tax receipts are what pay for vital public services such as education, healthcare, policing and transport infrastructure, to name but a few. Apart from the proposal not making any sense in relation to the recent narrative of public-sector deficit, austerity and “we’re all in it together”, it is also nothing other than a cynical bribe to the affluent. ... This proposal will entrench privilege and inequality.

The idea of society surely means that you care a bit about what happens to other people, not just your own children. Children from affluent families usually get “the best education money can buy”, benefit from influence and contacts when it comes to getting internships, ... and are able to afford to work unpaid while living for free in their parents’ homes. Now they are to inherit more money tax-free as well, if the Tories are elected. It is very clear that Conservatives want to load the dice well and truly in favour of those who already have.
Dr Crystal Romilly
London

http://www.theguardian.com/politics/2015/apr/14/inheritance-tax-relief-e...

montrealer58 montrealer58's picture

How much is inheritance tax in Canada?

Doug Woodard

The conservative case for the left:

http://gu.com/p/49pb7/sbl

I get the impression that Cameron wants to continue the right-wing revolution from where Thatcher left off - another Harper type with maybe more cunning and dissumulation.

Doug Woodard

montrealer58 wrote:

How much is inheritance tax in Canada?

See for example:

http://turbotax.intuit.ca/tax-resources/inheritance-tax.jsp

Lots more will come up on a search on "inheritance tax canada".

josh
Slumberjack

Being a smelly asshole must be a pre-requisite for the job of UK Prime Minister, considering how many apply and get awarded the position.

josh

Anti-austerity demos in the UK. Representing some of the over 60% that didn't vote Tory.

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-33210014?ocid=socialflow_twitter

Doug Woodard

Chagos islanders go to supreme court in battle to be allowed home:

http://gu.com/p/4a2v4/sbl

But Britain would have to throw the U.S. out, probably in contravention of a secret agreement. So another turndown or a very nasty scuffle.

Doug Woodard

UK business gets 93 billion pounds of subsidies per year:

http://gu.com/p/4aezd/sbl

 

josh

Jeremy Corbyn has a real shot to win Labour leadership.

http://www.mirror.co.uk/news/uk-news/jeremy-corbyn-beat-andy-burnham-611...

josh

Yeah, that'll go over really big. Goodbye Labour, hello Greens, a lot of folks will say. And Poodle Boy isn't happy:

http://www.bbc.com/news/uk-politics-33619645

DaveW
DaveW
josh

Problem is the while the people support it, the opinion makers in the media, political, consultant and business classes don't. And they hold a lot of sway over the politicians. In Britain, with the prevalence of the Murdoch press, this can be especially potent (remember Nightmare on Kinnock Street?). Nonetheless, a courageous leader who is able to communicate over the heads the neo-liberal iron triangle can win.

DaveW

.... causing a lot of strife within Labour:

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/uk/jeremy-corbyn-labour-mps-are-plotting-a-coup-against-the-potential-leader-if-he-is-elected-10399272.html

including a somewhat confusing Left-Right graphic of Labour contenders

Doug Woodard

Jeremy Corbyn's popularity understandable says economist Joseph Stiglitz:

http://gu.com/p/4b22m/sbl

 

josh

Senior Labour MPs are plotting to oust Jeremy Corbyn if he is elected party leader, amid growing fears that the leadership contest has been hijacked by far-Left infiltrators.

Shadow cabinet sources have told The Telegraph that Mr Corbyn would never be allowed to remain in the job long enough to fight the 2020 general election, if he is elected on September 12.

A coup could be launched within days of the result, which would plunge the party into even deeper crisis and division, but would be necessary to prevent an electoral “disaster” under Mr Corbyn’s leadership, senior figures said.

http://www.telegraph.co.uk/news/politics/labour/11764159/Jeremy-Corbyn-f...

JKR
quizzical

how come no one is talking about the House of Lords scandal where the morality Lord was filmed being unmoral?

Doug Woodard

What Jeremy Corbyn offers his supporters is clarity:

http://gu.com/p/4b5v2/sbl

 

Doug Woodard

The bilious rage of the British media (re refugees/migrants):

http://www.aljazeera.com/blogs/editors-blog/2015/08/bilious-rage-british...

 

Doug Woodard

Rush for dual-nationality passports as EU migrants fear Brexit:

http://gu.com/p/49zx4/sbl

 

NDPP

Holocaust Denial, Anti-Semitism Claims 'Ludicrous' - Corbyn

http://www.rt.com/uk/312728-Corbyn-anti-semitism-denies-Labour/

"Labour leadership frontrunner Jeremy Corbyn dismissed allegations on Monday he knowingly associated with Holocaust deniers, calling such claims 'ludicrous'. The anti-war advocate insisted any attempt to deny the Holocaust 'is vile and wrong.'

The allegations which surfaced in The Jewish Chronicle on Thursday, suggested Corbyn has links to 'Holocaust deniers, terrorists and some outright anti-Semites.'

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