The End of Canada's Open Internet?

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Fidel

6079_Smith_W wrote:
In reality the system we have right now has physical limits, and putting that infrastructure in place is a bigger job in our country than it is in smaller and more densely-populated areas.

That sounds like Canada versus Japan. And quite a few cities in Japan were levelled by 1945. What's our excuse?

But there are developed countries with lower population densities than Canada, have similar challenging topographical features to the landscape, and are more wired by comparison. So there goes that excuse.

The telephone grid is in place and servicing most Canadians. Very many Canadians have electrical power.

6079_Smith_W wrote:
Of course it shouldn't be this way, but until they either decide to or are compelled to build more capacity our existing system is going to get squeezed more and more, so we aren't in a position to talk about limitless anything,

Instead of being rubberstamps of approval for telcos, Canada's federal telecom regulators could do as NTT DoCoMo in Japan was ordered to do. NTT was simply told by the feds in Japan to make it happen. And they did. No fuss no waling or foot dragging. No long and dragged out deregulation needed. They simply made it happen. Median access speeds in Japan were quite a lot more than in the US or Canada a few years ago.. And all it took was a bit of compelling by the feds.

In 2008, Richard Priestman wrote about municpalities facing a $130 billion dollar infrastructure deficit. Instead of buying [url=http://www.comer.org/2008/2008a/bailcrcrunch.htm]$75 billion[/url] in bank-held mortgages two weeks after the election, the Harpers should have invested that money in much needed infrastructure. The City of Vancouver needs its aging sewers and water works replacing, and they didn't have the money then. I don't think internet capacity was included in deficit figures. But we can be sure that babblers thanks and DonOld could tell us how it could all be be financed.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

I apparently just don't understand the technology.  I did not think that we needed to have a conduit between cities I thought that satellite technology was used.  Because while Canada is a very large country we are also one of the more urbanized countries on the planet.   So if it is coming out of a satellite in an urban area then the cost for lines into homes is no greater in Canada. 

6079_Smith_W

@ kropotkin1951

Nope. If that were the case there probably wouldn't be people still using dialup in some rural areas.

And there's this:

http://www.pcmag-mideast.com/2010/04/15/internet-service-in-the-uae-affe...

Parts are DLS or coaxial, some is fibreoptic, and of course a growing amount of last mile traffic is through cell transmission. I'm not an expert in this either. But believe it or not, it doesn't come out of a magic hat.

 

sanizadeh

kropotkin1951 wrote:

I apparently just don't understand the technology.  I did not think that we needed to have a conduit between cities I thought that satellite technology was used.  Because while Canada is a very large country we are also one of the more urbanized countries on the planet.   So if it is coming out of a satellite in an urban area then the cost for lines into homes is no greater in Canada. 

Satellite channel cannot be used for the backbone of the internet anymore. Its bandwidth is very limited and its roundtrip delay is way too high, so it can only be used for last mile (access). Optical fiber is the current backbone of every network (telephony, Internet and Cable TV).

Fidel

And if anyone has ever had a satellite internet/TV connection with Bell or whatever, they will have noticed the picture goes wonky once in a while or even cuts out in the middle of a movie or favorite TV show. Rain and snow and other atmospheric conditions can interfere with satellite signals. Satellite is expensive. And telecommunications in countries like Cuba, for instance, will improve greatly with  connecting to the rest of the world by way of under sea fiber optic cables with friendly nations like Venezuela.

sanizadeh

Actually setting up a satellite data network across a country is probably cheaper and faster than an optical fiber network, but the speed you get with Satellite is not comparable with Fiber. Each backbone link must have the capacity to support traffic from thousands of users. A Satellite link has a capacity in the 1-10 Megabit/s range max, which is equal to one DSL line only. While a single fiber with today's technology can carry up to 160 wavelengths, each at 40 Gigabit/s, for a total capacity almost equal to one million DSL lines. There is simply no comparison.

Fidel

sanizadeh wrote:
Actually setting up a satellite data network across a country is probably cheaper and faster than an optical fiber network,

Backhaul microwave is often a preferred method for satellite downlinks with DSL or something over local loop on the uplink. Yes, pretty cheap compared to laying new fiber across vast expanses for sure.

Satellite connections in Cuba, for example, are about four times the cost of what could be provided with fiber optic. Overall cost of telecom operations for the Cubans will be reduced by about 25% with two fiber optic links to Venezuela. In 2006 they only had a 65 Mbps connection for the whole island.

 Satellite will still be necessary for telecom to the world in Cuba, though, as it is an island nation and still dealing with an embargo-genocidal sanctions waged against them from nearby continental USA. But fiber for downlinks will speed up connections many times over and allow millions of connections in Cuba. And, it should provide for information independence for Latin America to a larger extent.

And Poor African countries should benefit from undersea fiber optic cables as well, and I think there are projects in the works in that regard.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Thx i learnt something here today

6079_Smith_W

CRTC chides rogers on neutrality

http://www.michaelgeist.ca/content/view/5574/125/

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