Class War Is Here Forever

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NorthReport
Class War Is Here Forever

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NorthReport

Update on the class war: 1% winning, 99% regrouping

 

http://www.theglobeandmail.com/news/politics/second-reading/gerald-capla...

What’s particularly noteworthy here is that despite the success of the Occupy movement in putting inequality on the international agenda, it can safely be reported that just about everywhere, the 1 per cent are still laughing all the way to the bank. In fact they own the bank. Just a little south of here, the Bank of America was bailed out by American taxpayers to the tune of $45-billion. It claimed a pre-tax loss of $5.4-billion and so paid no taxes for the past two years. In one of those years, it dished out executive bonuses and compensation worth $35-billion. Could I make this stuff up?

The bargain between the 1 per cent and the governments of the 1 per cent is clear: huge tax breaks for the big boys, austerity for the 99 per cent. Can you handle more figures? Since the geniuses on Wall Street gave us the great crash of 2008, American banks received $7.7-trillion in bailout money and British banks $1.3-trillion. Yes, trillion, in both cases. To offset those losses to the public purse, the United States will cut public spending by $2.4-trillion in the next decade and Britain $128-billion. In Britain this will include almost half-a-million lost public sector jobs.

It’s time to resurrect the biting formula given us years ago by John Kenneth Galbraith, an earlier generation’s Paul Krugman: private affluence, public squalor.

Canada merely proves the rule. Despite our ever-receding kinder/gentler reputation, Canada is actually becoming more unequal faster than most other countries. There’s an elephant in the room here (as elsewhere) that’s almost always ignored. As economists Sam Gindin and Paul Kahnert report in the April CCPA Monitor, there’s far more wealth in Canada today than ever before. Per capita GDP is 50 per cent higher (adjusting for inflation) than 30 years ago. Yet most of that wealth has been transferred to the richest Canadians through tax cuts and government subsidies.

Since 1980, the ultra-rich have increased their share of the national income from 8.1 per cent to 13 per cent, a shift of $67-billion. Here’s a strange coincidence. The combined federal and provincial deficits now run at about $65-billion annually. So let’s see now. If taxes on the super-rich had stayed at their 1980 level – when no well-heeled Canadian was exactly suffering from cruel and unusual tax torture – there’d be no federal or provincial deficits today. Interesting.

NorthReport

Sounds like a plan - we'll see.

François Hollande will strike fear into the hearts of the rich

He has admitted that he 'does not like the rich' and declared: 'my real enemy is the world of finance'

http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/nabila-ramdani-franois...

 

NorthReport

This austerity backlash across Europe could transform Britain

The truth is that the real world has paid the high priests of austerity an unwelcome visit

 

http://www.independent.co.uk/opinion/commentators/owen-jones-this-auster...

Unionist

Thanks for finding these, NR!

 

NorthReport

Unionist, one thing I have always appreciated about Europe is the divergent political views expressed in the their msp

Imagine what it would be like to have this kind of msp reporting on a daily basis here in North America?

Although he and his minions try to give off the opposite impression, Rupert Murdoch is no fool, and knows full well the impact of 24/7 right wing msp propoganda. He didn't buy or set up Fox News for nothing! These fuckers are on a mission, and will stop at literally nothing, if we let them, to achieve it.

NorthReport

What baffles me though is how Labourites could have let someone like Blair anywhere near the leadership of their party.

And it is time for some serious quotas such as no one who went to what we consider a private school here in Canada be allowed to hold any position within the UK Labour party. And perhaps no lawyers allowed either. 

Actually it is time for some new political parties, here and abroad, which can represent the current scene and actually make the rich pay which has never seriously been tried.

I'm positive with all the tax loopholes cut out for these tax-free rich, there would be plenty of resources around so that we all could have healthcare, food, clothing, housing, dental, education, retirement, and death looked after   

NorthReport

Although a bit dated now probably a good beginning.

Repair of Taxation by Tom Kent

http://caledoninst.dreamhosters.com/Publications/PDF/553820789.pdf

NorthReport
NorthReport

Chickens usually come home to roost!

A generation hobbled by the soaring cost of education

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/05/13/business/student-loans-weighing-down-a...

Caissa

The federal government has won its appeal of a 2009 court decision ordering it to allow RCMP officers to unionize.

The Ontario Court of Appeal rejected the lower court's finding that RCMP officers' rights under the Charter are violated by regulations forbidding a union.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/politics/story/2012/06/01/pol-rcmp-union-court-ap...

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Quote:

It was revealed Tuesday that Sgt. Don Ray was demoted from the rank of staff sergeant and docked 10 days' pay following a disciplinary hearing last winter.

RCMP officer Don Ray posed for this photo while training civilian police in Sierra Leone in 2003-2004.

RCMP officer Don Ray posed for this photo while training civilian police in Sierra Leone in 2003-2004. (Our Canada Magazine)

Ray admitted that over a three-year period, he had sex with subordinates, drank with them at work and sexually harassed them. He also was found to have used his position to favour female potential employees.

In B.C., Ray will be working in a federal policing capacity and will not be part of any provincial or municipal policing contract, Sgt. Rob Vermeulen said in an email to CBC News.

“Senior managers are aware of the behaviour that led to his discipline and will be monitoring him closely to ensure that the disciplinary measures are having the desired effect and the offending behaviour does not recur,” Vermeulen said.

They already enjoy rights that no other worker in Canada gets. My concern is getting proper civilian over site of our police forces not better terms and conditions for the state's pawns in the class war.

Lets not forget that these misogynist pigs are the people training military and police forces for NATO. I think that as a priority group in society to have the wrongs against them righted they are at the bottom of my list.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2012/05/23/bc-disci...

Caissa

I support all workers right to organize.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

When does a worker become an overseer? In the Antebellum Era the rights of the blacks overseers, who I am sure also had it bad compared to any white person, would still have been on the bottom of my priority list. Its not that they didn't deserve to be free but seeking their rights in isolation is hardly a progressive idea.

Besides the ruling elite would not allow that because if the police went on strike who would they have left to give the orders to beat them up to?

Caissa may I ask why you chose to post this piece in a thread about Class Warfare?  It seems incongruous to me.

Caissa

We'll see how the Supreme Court rules on it Kropotkin. I posted it here because there is not a large enough critical mass at Babble these days to sustain thred proliferation.

josh

kropotkin1951 wrote:

They already enjoy rights that no other worker in Canada gets. My concern is getting proper civilian over site of our police forces not better terms and conditions for the state's pawns in the class war.

Lets not forget that these misogynist pigs are the people training military and police forces for NATO. I think that as a priority group in society to have the wrongs against them righted they are at the bottom of my list.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2012/05/23/bc-disci...

Glad to see you side with a decision taking away the right to organize.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

josh wrote:

kropotkin1951 wrote:

I think that as a priority group in society to have the wrongs against them righted they are at the bottom of my list.

Glad to see you side with a decision taking away the right to organize.

if you want to get personal at least try to be accurate. I didn't say any such thing. Please quote my words were I "sided" with the decision. Please don't interpret my posts because you seem to have trouble reading carefully for content.

in a thread on CLASS WARFARE you'll have to excuse me if I have little time for worrying about the terms and conditions of employment for the people tasked with shooting rubber bullets at me and other citizens.  And I really don't give a flying fuck if they are getting screwed out of overtime for the long hours they must put in infiltrating peaceful groups trying to organize demonstrations. 

If you want to make unionizing the RCMP your focus for progressive change well that is your choice.  As I said above they are my lowest priority.

NorthReport
NDPP

Idle Pleasures: Rousing the Age-Old Dream of the Heavy Laden  -  by Chris Floyd

http://chris-floyd.com/component/content/article/1-latest-news/2260-idle...

"When I was growing up, the 'four day work-week' was considered a viable political and social goal: the next logical step after the long and bloody struggle to win a five-day week for most working people. Like 'full employment' this idea was sometimes actually built into the public platform of serious, broad-based parties and political movements..

All this is long gone now, of course. As Owen Hatheby notes in the Guardian, both Right and Left have combined, for many decades, to advance the idea that pointless labour is our lot, and that we should be happy with it..."

alan smithee alan smithee's picture

kropotkin1951 wrote:

Quote:

It was revealed Tuesday that Sgt. Don Ray was demoted from the rank of staff sergeant and docked 10 days' pay following a disciplinary hearing last winter.

RCMP officer Don Ray posed for this photo while training civilian police in Sierra Leone in 2003-2004.

RCMP officer Don Ray posed for this photo while training civilian police in Sierra Leone in 2003-2004. (Our Canada Magazine)

Ray admitted that over a three-year period, he had sex with subordinates, drank with them at work and sexually harassed them. He also was found to have used his position to favour female potential employees.

In B.C., Ray will be working in a federal policing capacity and will not be part of any provincial or municipal policing contract, Sgt. Rob Vermeulen said in an email to CBC News.

“Senior managers are aware of the behaviour that led to his discipline and will be monitoring him closely to ensure that the disciplinary measures are having the desired effect and the offending behaviour does not recur,” Vermeulen said.

They already enjoy rights that no other worker in Canada gets. My concern is getting proper civilian over site of our police forces not better terms and conditions for the state's pawns in the class war.

Lets not forget that these misogynist pigs are the people training military and police forces for NATO. I think that as a priority group in society to have the wrongs against them righted they are at the bottom of my list.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/british-columbia/story/2012/05/23/bc-disci...

 

The RCMP are at it again ;

http://news.sympatico.ca/oped/coffee-talk/rcmp_officers_caught_having_on...

I don't know what to add to this....What an embarrassing 'Canadian Institution' Frown And they have the nerve to enforce 'morality'?

NDPP

The Western Welfare State: Its Rise and Demise and the Soviet Bloc  -  by James Petras

http://www.globalresearch.ca/index.php?context=va&aid=31753

"...The 'anti-Stalinist' Left intellectuals have never engaged in any serious reflection regarding their own role in bringing down the collective welfare state nor have they assumed any responsibility for the devastating socio-economic consequences in both the East and West. Furthermore the same intellectuals have had no reservations in this 'Post Soviet era' in supporting ('critically' of course) the British Labor Party, the French Socialist Party, the Clinton-Obama Democratic Party and other 'lesser evils' which practice neo-liberalism.

They supported the utter destruction of Yugoslavia and US-led colonial wars in the Middle East, North Africa and South Asia. Not a few 'anti-Stalinist' intellectuals in England and France will have clinked champagne glasses with the generals, bankers and oil elites after NATO's bloody invasion and devastation of Libya - Africa's only welfare state..."

Aristotleded24

[url=http://www.commondreams.org/view/2012/07/07-2]Does union-busting literally lead to less power for working people?[/url]

Quote:
Griffin says that starting 15 years ago, Pepco stopped hiring workers to replace retiring electrical workers and offered incentive-laden buyout deals to get electricians to retire. In order to address understaffing problems, Pepco has at times hired non-union temporary contractors, instead of hiring new workers. Griffin estimates that Pepco currently employs 1,150 union workers and approximately 400 non-union contractors. The understaffing has led to problems that the IBEW warned about years ago.

"Everything is keyed on dollars and cents profit," warned IBEW Utility Director Jim Hunter back in 2005. "Storm outages are longer, and utilities are asking for more and more help from other utilities. The problem is that other companies are in the same boat. And they are still not hiring."

Despite having a negative -57% tax rate from 2008 to 2010 and making nearly $822 million in profits during that period, Pepco has not hired a sufficient number of electricians to properly maintain the system. Griffin claims the insufficient number of linemen causes Pepco's system to go out more often not just during storms, but on hot summer days when electrical grids are maxed out from air conditioners and fans. When big storms do hit and knock down the system, PEPCO hires outside contractors from far-away states to help in repairs.

Fidel

James Petras wrote:
In other words, while Western intellectuals still boast of their triumphs over Stalinism, the real existing workers in the East are engaged in day-to-day militant struggles to retain and regain the positive welfare features of those maligned states. Nowhere is this more evident than in China and Russia , where privatizations have meant a loss of employment and, in the case of China , the brutal loss of public health benefits. Today workers' families with serious illnesses are ruined by the costs of privatized medical care.

recordnet wrote:
Health care is human right

Several countries, far less affluent than we, are working hard to provide universal health care for all their citizens. China, Mexico, Thailand, and even Rwanda and Ghana - two of the world's poorest nations - are striving for the same goal.

China committed $126 billion to new hospitals and clinics. Although health care levels vary widely in China, they are striving to improve. It could be that China achieves universal/socialized health care before the USA ever does. China made remarkable strides toward national health and education until 1976, the year of Mao's death.

"Anti-Stalinist" mentioned 21 times. Good essay by Petras. The western world has certainly lost a lot of social democracy and hard fought-for social rights since the end of the cold war.

NorthReport

It is only until situations like this are completely eliminated, will we have some sense of equality in our societies. 

Wealthy hiding $21 trillion in tax havens, report says

'Debtor countries' are actually wealthy when hidden money is accounted for

 

http://www.cbc.ca/news/world/story/2012/07/22/tax-havens.html

Fidel

I think various babblers have written about how today's capitalists pay lip service to "classical liberal economists" and what they actually wrote in the past. Linda McQuaig wrote about how today's capitalism basically does everything Smith, Mill, Ricardo and especially Marx warned us against. 

Michael Hudson wrote:
 "300 years of classical political economy sought to get rid of landlords and bankers."

I believe neoliberalism is basically the opposite of "classical liberalism." They've managed to undo in 30 or 35 years what took three centuries to achieve in setting up modern industrial economies and legal systems that increasingly granted certain rights to debtors over those of creditors. Many of those rights have been lost since the beginning of the "new" liberal capitalism.

This is not the class war spoken of 100 years ago. It is no longer a class war between workers and industrialists - industrial capitalists are overthrown by financial capitalists since the 1980's. Very many of the owners of the means aren't even based in Canada anymore and jobs are "offshored". Labour's power is diminished as a result.

Today it's a war of finance capitalism against entire economies.

Sean in Ottawa

That's a must read article-- thanks for posting it North Report.

It is important that people recognize that the so-called invisible hand is actually attached to a body. That body has interests and wields a lot of power.

NorthReport

Redistributing wealth upward

http://www.washingtonpost.com/opinions/harold-meyerson-the-party-that-tr...

The less widely understood way that Republicans have helped redistribute wealth to the already wealthy is by changing the rules. Markets don’t function without rules, and the rules that Republican policymakers have made since Ronald Reagan became president have consistently depressed the share of the nation’s income that the middle class can claim.

Part of the intellectual sleight-of-hand that Republicans employ in discussions of redistribution is to reserve that term solely for government intervention in the market that redistributes income downward. But markets redistribute wealth continuously. In recent decades, markets have redistributed wealth from manufacturing to finance, from Main Street to Wall Street, from workers to shareholders. Rules made by “pro-market” governments (including those of “pro-market” Democrats) have enabled these epochal shifts. Free trade with China helped hollow out manufacturing; the failure to regulate finance enabled Wall Street to swell; the opposition to labor’s efforts to reestablish an even playing field during organizing campaigns has all but eliminated collective bargaining in the private sector.

 

 

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

And I thought that Invisible Hand was just another term for a pickpocket. 

Cool

Sean in Ottawa

Kropotkin-- pickpockets have bodies as well. But you are quite right: the invisible hand is attached to a thief.

NorthReport

http://www.nytimes.com/2012/11/30/opinion/krugman-class-wars-of-2012.htm...

The important thing to understand now is that while the election is over, the class war isn’t. The same people who bet big on Mr. Romney, and lost, are now trying to win by stealth — in the name of fiscal responsibility — the ground they failed to gain in an open election.

Before I get there, a word about the actual vote. Obviously, narrow economic self-interest doesn’t explain everything about how individuals, or even broad demographic groups, cast their ballots. Asian-Americans are a relatively affluent group, yet they went for President Obama by 3 to 1. Whites in Mississippi, on the other hand, aren’t especially well off, yet Mr. Obama received only 10 perce

 

NDPP

World's 100 Richest Earned Enough in 2012 To End Global Poverty 4 Times Over

http://rt.com/news/oxfam-report-global-inequality-357/

"The world's 100 richest people earned a stunning total of $240 million in 2012 - enough money to end extreme poverty worldwide four times over, Oxfam has revealed, adding that the global economic crisis is further enriching the super-rich. 'The richest 1% has increased its income by 60 percent in the last 20 years,' while the income of the top 0.01 percent has seen even greater growth, a new Oxfam report says..."

NorthReport

Chart of the Day: America's 30-Year Project to Make the Rich Even Richer

http://www.motherjones.com/kevin-drum/2013/06/chart-day-americas-30-year...

NorthReport

They publish this stuff like it is some kind of positive achievement.

Ever wonder why prescription drugs cost so much?

U.S. CEO sets a record with $159 million pension

http://www.thestar.com/business/personal_finance/2013/06/25/us_ceo_sets_...

NDPP

Millionaires Become The Majority in US Congress

http://www.wsws.org/en/articles/2014/01/11/mill-j11.html

"More than half the members of the US Congress are millionaires, an analysis released by the Center for Responsive Politics revealed this week. The obscene wealth of US legislators is an expression of the domination of American society by a plutocracy.

About 1 percent of all Americans are millionaires..."

HYPERTlGER HYPERTlGER's picture

In all the first world countries...20% of the income earning workers are net producers....meaning they produce more than they consume.

The other 80% of the income earning workers are net consumers...meaning they consume more than they produce.

 

In Canada it works out to...

 

3,520,000 employees that are net producers or productive members of society...The power plant...Or supply of power

14,080,000 employees that are net consumers or consumptive members of society...The light bulbs...Or demand for power

 

When the demand of the net consumers becomes greater than the supply by the net producers...The economic systsem becomes yield starved and all in the the system begin eating themselves attempting to satisfy their hunger.

This process became visible in 2008 when the 1944 bretton woods global trade agreemnet which made the USA the supply of inflation and the rest of the world the demand for inflation...Reached maximum potential after 6 decades and begain visibly collapsing to oblivion...and has been getting worse and worse since then till now.

 

The exponential growth of the past 6 decades or doubling time reached maximum potential in 2008 and the exponential decay or half life is taking over...or becoming visible since inflation is sustained by causing deflation.

 

Like chopping down (deflating) trees faster than they regrow to power inflation.

 

When the trees begin to run out...Inflation or life that is powered by deflation or death of the forrest turns into deflation of inflation or life powered by the deflation or death of the forrest.

The fire of life grows more and more until the supply of firewood begins to run out and then the fire of life grows less and less...and when the trees run out completely.

 

That is absolute zero...the fire of inflation or life goes out...and the darkenss of deflation or death is all that remains.

 

 

 

Caissa

A group of United Church ministers in Ontario has joined Canada's largest private-sector union.

Clergy have launched Unifaith, a community chapter of Unifor, which has more than 300,000 members.

"A large number of colleagues are aware of issues of workplace bullying, isolation and desolation for those serving in their vocation. This has been an ongoing concern for us for many years now," said Rev. Jim Evans, Unifaith's interim president. "We’ve looked at various ways to address what could happen in terms of advocacy and professional development for those who are indeed in desperate circumstances."

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/windsor/united-church-ministers-unionize-under-unifor-banner-1.2500560

Unionist

Great news... thanks for this Caissa! I remember the CAW had an organizing campaign for United Church ministers back in the 1990s and always wondered where that ended up.

I had to chuckle about this, though:

Quote:

Rev. Janet Walker doesn't think a union is necessary, though.

"If our focus is only on ourselves, we're missing what our ministry is," she said. "I guess that's why, for me, I haven't had an interest in looking at what this union is about. I'm more focused on what we can do for others."

I don't want to count the number of variations on that theme I've heard from workers who haven't yet figured out that without a collective voice, they're toast.

Let me remind Rev. Walker of what one of our sages, Rabbi Hillel, said a couple thousand years ago:

Quote:
“If I am not for myself, who will be for me? But if I am only for myself, what am I? And if not now, when?”

Still good questions for our time.

 

Caissa

I though organizing ministers added a whole new twist to "Class Warfare is Here Forever." Wink

Unionist

Ahaha, I missed that twist. Mind you, I hope they realize that the minute they start suggesting that we "turn the other cheek", or "love thy enemy", they're out!!!

NorthReport

If you don’t understand how people fall into poverty, you’re probably a sociopathLucy ManganLucy Mangan

Why don’t abused women just leave their partners? Why don’t poor people just spend less? Why do people in positions of power ask so many stupid questions?

‘Inequality has become a challenge to us as moral beings’

 

http://www.theguardian.com/commentisfree/2015/jan/24/if-you-dont-underst...

NorthReport

Of course he does.

Rich people try and make it complicated so that no one understands what they are talking about.

Either there is growing inequality or there isn't.

There obviously is, and we need to fix it, but people like Buffett are the last people that should be approached to fix it or even offer their opinions how to fix it.

Warren Buffett thinks the poor should stop blaming inequality on the rich

http://www.independent.co.uk/news/people/warren-buffett-thinks-that-the-...

iyraste1313

no doubt this is a crucially important discussion!

But the roots of the growing inequality across the globe lies in the fundamental nature of our private financial system and its stock market based accumulation of increaingly leveraged increasingly risky finance capital, swishing around the planet that dwarfs the gross of the production system and their government managers(?)

Any serious debate on remedies must sweep away with the platitudes of our so called and puppet poliitcal parties, which never will deal with the problem. The markets and their fabulously rich managers must be challenged, the means of production decentralized and deprivatized from their control. There is no getting away from this with palliatives!

If people here are serious about dealing with the problem of exploding inequality, then there must be discussions on building alternatives to the system itself and its toolkit including the farse of our so called democratic system! Otherwise it´s just all hypocrisy... 

Sean in Ottawa

I am not one of those who think all parties are the same so please do not read that into what I will say here.

No matter what party, most of those who are elected are privileged in almost every respect-- you can see this in gender (nowhere near parity in Canada). You can see that most are white unless they are from communities where the majority in the community is non-white. And seldom are they promoted in the caucus of their party. How often does a person of colour get elected to the House from a riding that is majority white? Does a person from a part of the country where the majority are  people of colour really know what it is like coming from another part of the country? Perhaps. But certainly white people (like me) can only imagine what we have not experienced no matter how well-meaning we may be.

The people elected to the NDP are most often well-meaning but also relatively well-off. They may mean well but it does not mean that they truly understand through experience what social justice is. This distortion is so severe that people who are in the middle often think they are at the bottom and struggling -- even if they aspire to be in the middle. People who are low income rarely come in contact with middle income people never mind higher income people. Our social circles usually approximate our circumstances. We even choose to a great degree our news and opinion. We live in parallel but different universes.

In the latest polls we are seeing a class divide. I always thought this was there to some degree but that lower income people were being conned into supporting other parties. Perhaps it is just that the BS is not working as well this time.

But at the end of the day can you really trust the NDP to completely understand?

They will get labour because labour is well-represented. At times they may still take labour for granted and propose bad policy because they are trying to be popular rather than right. But they at least understand.

But can you really expect any party to understand what it is like to work on minimum wage and try to live in a major city on this income? Can any party understand what it is like to try to get by on social assistance or even how a person comes to depend on it? The NDP may be more inclined to listen to what people are saying who are in this position but let us not pretend that they are representative. The class war will remain in part because the ignorance that it is founded on and the lack of representation will be there.

Doug Woodard

The Revolt of the Rich:

http://www.theamericanconservative.com/articles/revolt-of-the-rich/

A golden oldie I would say (2012).

NorthReport

Sick! Frown

A grim bargain

Once a weakness, low-skilled workers who get paid little have become the Deep South’s strength

http://www.washingtonpost.com/sf/business/2015/12/01/a-grim-bargain/?hpi...

NorthReport

Former Massey Energy C.E.O. Guilty in Deadly Coal Mine Blast

http://www.nytimes.com/2015/12/04/us/donald-blankenship-massey-energy-up...

Doug Woodard

[ARTICLE] The Ruling Class Does Not Rule: Notes on the Marxist Theory of the State, by Fred Block:

https://www.ssc.wisc.edu/~wright/SOC621/RulingClass.pdf