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Meatless Mondays, a good idea worth looking at

NorthReport
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Joined: Jul 6 2008

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NorthReport
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Joined: Jul 6 2008

Who will be the first Canadian municipality to follow suit?

LA City Council has just vote 12-0 in favour of Meatless Mondays for health and environmental reasons

City Council asks L.A. residents to go 'meatless' on Mondays

http://latimesblogs.latimes.com/lanow/2012/11/city-council-asks-la-resid...

 


Boom Boom
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Joined: Dec 29 2004

Going meatless on Friday or Saturday - when more people dine out - would have a greater impact. Some fast food joints offer stuff like veggie burgers or fish burgers (although I wonder - are fish included in the "meatless" idea?).


MegB
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Joined: Nov 28 2001
I cook a meat-free meal at least once a week. Not vegan, mind you, but without meat, poultry or fish. My eldest was vegetarian from about age 5 until she hit her teens. I had plenty of practice cooking without any meat/fish/poultry.

Michelle
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Joined: May 10 2001

Unless you make it a "vegan Monday" then I doubt it will have any impact at all.  All farmed animal products including dairy require animals to be kept, fed calories, slaughtered (they don't get to go retire at HappyFarm Pastures when they stop producing, and the males who can't produce dairy products have to go somewhere), and housed on land.  Serving a dish with no meat, but which still has dairy in it isn't going to help anything.

And vegan won't do much for the environment for us here if you're getting your organic veggies from California during the winter, either.  (Although in LA it might be easier to get vegetables locally sourced all year-round, if the food system was set up that way.  Unfortunately, with the famous food deserts in that city, it's not quite that easy either.)


Timebandit
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Joined: Sep 25 2001

I don't buy the idea that all animal products = environmental devastation.  Eggs and dairy, within reason, are not that harmful.  And while the animals have to be housed, bear in mind that there is no organic farming without manure.  The most sustainable system is mixed farming.

There are also large quantities of land, or at least there are out here on the prairie, that are unsuitable for cultivation but support grazing very well.  And real prairie ecosystems *need* bovines on it - in the abscence of buffalo, cattle are actually preserving the last bits of it. 

Add to this that a purely vegan diet is difficult, if not impossible to balance.  Humans are, after all, omnivores.  Vegetarian is just fine.  We eat vegetarian dishes (some of which are actually vegan, but not all) a couple of times a week, so I don't have any real antipathy to the idea of not eating meat, just that the absolutes that are often used in this argument aren't as clean-cut as they look.


Michelle
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Joined: May 10 2001

I am coming around to your point of view on this as well, Timebandit.  I'm just saying that even if we accepted the original premise, that lower on the food chain is better for the environment, using dairy and not meat really isn't any lower on the food chain.


Slumberjack
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Joined: Aug 8 2005

Meatless activism is designed with mostly urban dwellers in mind to try their hand at.  In the face of the totality of corporate animal cruelty, it's like acquiring an indulgence through the withholding of money in this instance.


6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010

The health reasons for having a more balanced diet (and not just WRT meat) are documented. And while meat consumption isn't solely responsible for habitat destruction or animal cruelty, there certainly is a case to be made that the overconsumption of meat, and the effect of industry lobbys promoting it, are generally negative.

But there's no need to accept or reject it based on a doctrinaire approach. It can also just be a good exercise in trying a new approach to your food - for one thing, the fact that small portions of meat or no meat at all - can often be just as satisfying as a portion which takes up two thirds of your plate. In some cases even more satisfying.

 

 


MegB
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Joined: Nov 28 2001

Some of my favourite dishes contain a small amount of meat and a whole bunch of veggies.  In fact, in a few minutes I'll be stripping a small chicken carcass to make chicken soup.  It's mostly veggies with whatever bits of chicken are left.  And if you know how to make a decent chicken broth, you can throw just about anything into it and it'll taste good.

It's probably one of the healthiest things I cook. Of course the health benefits are mitigated by the butter-slathered biscuits I bake to go with it.

Hey, I might die with clogged arteries, but I'll die happy.


Timebandit
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Joined: Sep 25 2001

I did the same thing a couple of weeks ago - chicken soup is so nice when it's cold!  I also made a batch of drop cheese biscuits a la Edna Staebler. 


Unionist
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Joined: Dec 11 2005
Timebandit wrote:

... chicken soup is so nice when it's cold!

Never tried it that way.

Timebandit
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Joined: Sep 25 2001

Cold OUT.  My bad.  Moving too fast to finish sentences today.


6079_Smith_W
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Joined: Jun 10 2010

I'm not familiar with all the science, but I have heard that clogged arteries has more to do with processed oils and fats than with lard, butter, goose and chicken fat, which are actually supposed to be very good for you in moderation.

I can chicken and turkey leftovers. For some reason that process makes the flavour way more rich and intense, certainly better than freezing it. And like most canned stuff, it is very convenient to just pop it out of the can.

And again, I don't know all the science, but a doctor friend of mine swears by bone broth - pork usually - as something that is very good for the body.

And a couple of my favourite chicken recipes are cold - Vietnamese salad, and a great cantonese dish of cold boiled chicken (split through the bone) on hot rice, with raw garlic/ginger/scallion sauce.

 


MegB
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Joined: Nov 28 2001

6079_Smith_W wrote:

I'm not familiar with all the science, but I have heard that clogged arteries has more to do with processed oils and fats than with lard, butter, goose and chicken fat, which are actually supposed to be very good for you in moderation.

That was not meant to be taken literally, but thank you for the learning moment.

Unless something catastrophic happens, I'll likely die of a combination of old age, genetic predisposition, and environmental toxins.  Like most of us.

Though I may take up extreme skiing in avalanche prone areas.

 


Otavano
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Joined: Oct 7 2012

I would barely even notice "meatless Mondays" seeing that I'm vegan as a lifestyle choice anyway.


Otavano
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Joined: Oct 7 2012

Slumberjack wrote:

Meatless activism is designed with mostly urban dwellers in mind to try their hand at.  In the face of the totality of corporate animal cruelty, it's like acquiring an indulgence through the withholding of money in this instance.

Strange that you call it activism. I'm vegan, but not a member of PETA and I quite frankly don't see my veganism in any political light. To me it's just a lifestyle choice out of compassion for animals.

Besides, for such a lifestyle choice that affects your daily choices a few times a day every day, I doubt that political activism alone would provide the necessary motivation to keep that up. It's not like "meatless Mondays" or some other day reserved for the purpose.


lagatta
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Joined: Apr 17 2002

Being vegan isn't necessarily activism, but attempting to convince other people to eat less meat is definitely activism; taking collective action to make changes in the state of affairs. Here, to modify people's eating habits in what you see as a more sustainable choice, and also to change what is available in restaurants, takeaways etc. 


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