Is the term "Nurse" too sexist for a job description?

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Ward
Is the term "Nurse" too sexist for a job description?

Just putting that out there.maybe already been discussed...

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

While men have recently started to enter Nursing in greater numbers than in the past, I think that Nursing is still regarded as -- and is -- a mostly female profession.

So we could call them "Associate Medical Professionals" if we wanted to, but as soon as everyone realized that "Associate Medical Professionals" were roughly 90% female, it would be the same thing.

To put it another way, I don't think the issue is that the word "Nurse" is somehow sexist, it's that the profession remains gendered.

Ward

Agree..I also think that term scares the heck out of testosterone laden males  that may otherwise consider entering into the practice. (Milking is not part of the job anymore is it?)

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Well, again, I don't think it's the term, but rather the reality: they'd be entering a mostly female world.

As a consolation prize, men who enter Nursing are more likely (statistically) to be given administrative roles, and more likely (statistically) to be given academic leadership roles.  No huge surprise there, I guess.

Just as an aside, when I was a McMaster student back in 1986, one of my residence-mates was a dude, in the Nursing program.  But he didn't actually want to work as a Nurse; he just saw it as a backdoor to medical (i.e. "Doctor") school.  I've no idea whether it helped him with that.

Ward

I hear ya. But there is something blatantly out of balance  (not very 2016) about the optics of the term(word).

quizzical

well when people think Dr they think male....should we change it too because of gender imbalance in the field and if we changed it more women would go into the field?

Slumberjack

I know plenty of male RNs and LPNs.  None of them seem to mind the title Nurse,  None of the male RNs and LPNs I know have been given administrative or leadership positions.

Malcontent

You so called aggressive feminists/feminazi's are never ever going to be happy and you guys if you want to be men so bad get a sex change.

quizzical

Malcontent wrote:
You so called aggressive feminists/feminazi's are never ever going to be happy and you guys if you want to be men so bad get a sex change.

what a pos post this is.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
You so called aggressive feminists/feminazi's are never ever going to be happy and you guys if you want to be men so bad get a sex change.

[IMG]http://i64.tinypic.com/35k8i9s.jpg[/IMG]

ygtbk

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Quote:
You so called aggressive feminists/feminazi's are never ever going to be happy and you guys if you want to be men so bad get a sex change.

[IMG]http://i64.tinypic.com/35k8i9s.jpg[/IMG]

I love it. I think there should be a mushroom cloud visible out the window, but otherwise perfect.

Paladin1

Malcontent wrote:

You so called aggressive feminists/feminazi's are never ever going to be happy and you guys if you want to be men so bad get a sex change.

 

Aren't guys already men?

Misfit

Well, Ward was a troll in the Jian Ghomeshi thread as well as in other threads. Just the usual, I guess. I think his sole purpose on rabble is to disrupt.

Paladin1

What a shitlord.

Pondering

Paladin1 wrote:

Malcontent wrote:

You so called aggressive feminists/feminazi's are never ever going to be happy and you guys if you want to be men so bad get a sex change.

Aren't guys already men?

I don't think real men use the word feminazi. It's weirdly wimpy and hostile at the same time. It reminds me of the conspiracies are for losers thread.

MegB

Malcontent wrote:

You so called aggressive feminists/feminazi's are never ever going to be happy and you guys if you want to be men so bad get a sex change.

Oh boy. You are so gone.

Ward

I don't really know what a troll is..but I know it's not good...sorry for having a thought.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Have you Googled it yet?  You should really Google it.

Ward

Ok..checked it out..I feel nothing wrong with raising a potentially challenging  question, issue, thought

Personally I don't  highly value  emotional responses to something as benign as a question, about the general  political correctness of a term.

Perhaps this is no longer the forum for such debate. It once was.

Sineed

I work with dozens of nurses, and though women are still the majority, there are plenty of men.

Ward

I work alongside of crafty tradesman that probably regard the medical industry, in a professional sense, as being "above" them. And yet would be horrified to learn that their son would cinsider a career as a "nurse" but not so much a "medical assistant " 

Pondering

Ward wrote:

I work alongside of crafty tradesman that probably regard the medical industry, in a professional sense, as being "above" them. And yet would be horrified to learn that their son would cinsider a career as a "nurse" but not so much a "medical assistant " 

I see no reason to humour sexist homophobes by changing the name of a profession to suit them. If men are intimitated by the title "nurse" or their parents opinion of it they wouldn't make good nurses anyway.

You seem to think men not wanting to be nurses is a problem. It isn't. No one is preventing them or trying to discourage them from being nurses. There is no evidence that male nurses have more trouble getting work than female nurses.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Ward, you really might want to have a chat with some actual nurses -- male and female -- before you go off and create a new job title for them.  One of the (many) stereotypes they contend with on a daily basis is that of being an "assistant" rather than a profession in their own right.

Quote:
And yet would be horrified to learn that their son would cinsider a career as a "nurse" but not so much a "medical assistant "

Do you think they'd be similarly horrified if their daughter wished to apprentice as a welder?

If not, what do you suppose might be the difference?  See Pondering's post above for a free hint.

quizzical

there's even the title out here of Nurse Practitioner. they can do anything a GP can do but make 200,000.00 less. 

i think Ward is the one with the problem over the job title.

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
there's even the title out here of Nurse Practitioner. they can do anything a GP can do but make 200,000.00 less.

I could be wrong about this, but I wonder if maybe the earnings discrepancy is because a NP doesn't bill directly, while a GP does?

It's my understanding that OHIP (or your provincial equivalent) pays a set amount by procedure (e.g. administering an allergy shot) and not by job title.  But you keep all of that amount if billing directly as a practitioner, and not if you're paid by an employer (e.g. a walk-in clinic) who bills.

kropotkin1951 kropotkin1951's picture

Apparently in the US at least men are entering nursing at larger rates all the time. The unreal part of that equation is they make more than women although at 91 cents on the dollar that is way better than most occupations.

Quote:

Women working as nurses full‐time, year‐round earned 91 cents for every dollar male nurses earned.

https://www.census.gov/people/io/files/Men_in_Nursing_Occupations.pdf

ouroboros

Sexist? Probably not. Gendered? Yeah. Stewardess is a good example of a gendered title which the profession has been trying to change. I haven't heard of a call for nurse to be changed but I can see where you are coming from. 

ouroboros

Sexist? Probably not. Gendered? Yeah. Stewardess is a good example of a gendered title which the profession has been trying to change. I haven't heard of a call for nurse to be changed but I can see where you are coming from. 

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Stewardess (like waitress, or actress) is a gendered term because there exists a separate term for a male doing the same thing (steward, waiter, actor), and I know that the preferred terms now are flight attendant, server and actor.

But there's no word for a male nurse.  Except, for those who really wish to make the distinction, "male nurse".

ouroboros

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Stewardess (like waitress, or actress) is a gendered term because there exists a separate term for a male doing the same thing (steward, waiter, actor), and I know that the preferred terms now are flight attendant, server and actor.

But there's no word for a male nurse.  Except, for those who really wish to make the distinction, "male nurse".

I had never heard the term "airline stward" before. I didn't know it was used that way.

I still think nurse is gendered. The word itself came from "nurice, derived from the fifth-century post-Classical Latinnutrice, a wet-nurse" and has through it's history been a word associated a great deal with women.

Here is a source https://nursemanifest.com/2012/04/24/some-history-on-the-origin-of-the-w...

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Just for the record, I'm certainly not suggesting that the term isn't still strongly associated with women.

So is the word "tampon".  But that's not the same as either of them being "gendered".

Anyway, if actual nurses start agitating for a different title for their profession, I'll listen quite attentively.  But to just go ahead and change it to something else so that men won't feel emasculated if they choose it for a profession?

quizzical

the word doctor is gendered then as it comes from the word used for church fathers and doctors have always been men. let's change it.

ffs. 

 

Timebandit

I'd just like to note that language, like organisms, can evolve. A word may have begun its life with a gendered meaning and it's possible for that word's meaning to evolve past that.

oldgoat

I've worked pretty closely with nurses of all genders for most of my career.  Never heard this raised as an issue until now.  Used to be that male nurses tended to be hired in the mental health field where I have always toiled, but for a variety of reasons not so much now.