Why being denied tenure is a big deal

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Caissa

Is it permissible on Babble to advocate for the rollback of hard fought workers' rights?

j.m.

remind wrote:

Please do name what "tenured professors and professions" are on the side of the "left", besides perhaps sociology?

Sociology is not always alligned with the left. But, if I may try a list:

Anthropology, Women/Gender Studies, (some) History, Labour Studies, (some) Geography and Urban Studies, and a potpourri of individuals in interdisciplinary programs.

Quote:

And I am hardly anti-intellectual, as being against tenured neoptism, where "intellectual" peers tell each other they are wonderful is hardly intellectual pursuits, when was the last time there were earth shattering/changing deliberations and findings that were non-mainstream coming out of the tenured set anyway?

Even those within the left reproduce nepotism, but there are non-MS publications within academia. There are certainly a handful of people willing to challenge the institution, albeit they are few and far between.

Quote:

And get over the shock of finding those on the left being against tenure here, I find lots of other  what I consider to be right wing or neoliberal nonsense being espoused here continually too. Such as rtelling people they are more than other people....that is so egalitarianly progressive! :rolleyes:

besides that, in addressing the thought terminating cliche crowd,  to be anti-intellectual one would be advocating closing down higher education facilities as opposed to advocating for lowered tuitions, or fully fiunded, so more can access  the "hallowed halls".

Not to sound too much like a cliche of the Old Boys' Clubs: "Hear Hear!"

 

 

Snert Snert's picture

I think that a lifetime job at a very high rate of pay is closer to CEO salaries than to a 40 hour week or a minimum wage.  Let's not pretend that the inhabitants of the Ivory tower had to fight their way to dignity and safety in their job, nor that denying them a job for life would strip them of that.

Personally, I agree with tenure insofar as it's all that stands between a controversial professor and the UI line, but it's certainly not a right, it's a privelege.  Privelege being the operative word here.

DaveW

G. Muffin wrote:
These academics need a dose of reality. Who else gets tenure?

well, civil servants do, basically, once they have permanent/career contracts, and so do lawyers (partners), and other professionals in large organizations

 

in any case, an account I did not see above:

http://chronicle.com/article/Professor-Had-Raised-Concerns/64221/

j.m.

Snert wrote:

I think that a lifetime job at a very high rate of pay is closer to CEO salaries than to a 40 hour week or a minimum wage.  Let's not pretend that the inhabitants of the Ivory tower had to fight their way to dignity and safety in their job, nor that denying them a job for life would strip them of that.

Personally, I agree with tenure insofar as it's all that stands between a controversial professor and the UI line, but it's certainly not a right, it's a privelege.  Privelege being the operative word here.

In that case its value is for its protective properties, such as producing different kinds of knowledge and engaging with different pedagogies. How many times do we see professors exercising tenure in this way?

I agree with your point on privilege. What ilk do we tend to see rise to the top in Graduate Schools and Faculties?

Caissa

Let's examine the case of Frank Underhill

During World War II, Underhill moved away from socialism and became a left-wing liberal continentalist.[5] He remained a committed anti-imperialist and was almost dismissed from the University of Toronto in 1941 for suggesting that Canada would drift away from the British Empire and draw closer to the United States. His struggle with the university became a landmark in the history of academic freedom in Canada.[6]

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Underhill

BillBC

j.m. wrote:

remind wrote:

Please do name what "tenured professors and professions" are on the side of the "left", besides perhaps sociology?

Sociology is not always alligned with the left. But, if I may try a list:

Anthropology, Women/Gender Studies, (some) History, Labour Studies, (some) Geography and Urban Studies, and a potpourri of individuals in interdisciplinary programs.

Quote:

Plus First Nations Studies, a great many in Political Science, Literature, Environmental Studies, Biology, a surprising number in Economics...

But few, if any, in Business...

Caissa

Michiel Horn's book on the history of Academic Freedom in Canada

http://books.google.com/books?id=v4Q8dqEyvFcC&printsec=frontcover&dq='Academic+Freedom+in+Canada%22&source=bl&ots=W37A5K5BpA&sig=qOhsWukbjDSElkbH71oLuziQkv8&hl=en&ei=Unl9S8GGPIXblAfqvLCsBQ&sa=X&oi=book_result&ct=result&resnum=1&ved=0CAcQ6AEwAA#v=onepage&q=&f=false

BillBC

Caissa wrote:

Let's examine the case of Frank Underhill

During World War II, Underhill moved away from socialism and became a left-wing liberal continentalist.[5] He remained a committed anti-imperialist and was almost dismissed from the University of Toronto in 1941 for suggesting that Canada would drift away from the British Empire and draw closer to the United States. His struggle with the university became a landmark in the history of academic freedom in Canada.[6]

">http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Frank_Underhill

 

A landmark case, though the speech for which he was almost fired took place nearly 70 years ago, in 1941, and what he said would be considered mainstream today.  I heard him speak once, towards the end of his life.  A fine person, but no radical....