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Fat phobia

martin dufresne
Offline
Joined: Dec 24 2005

please forward :)

Two feminist activists are putting together a fat phobia zine for the Edmonton Anarchist Bookfair (Oct 3-4 2009).

We are looking for photos, art, poems and other writings from individuals talking about experiences of fat phobia, which may also include internalized fat phobia, disordered eating and the impact of fat phobia on our perceptions of our bodies, etc. Articles, art and blogs already published are welcomed, provided the writer/artist consents to including their work in the zine.

We are particularly interested in how the patriarchy, transmisogyny and transphobia, ableism, racism, classism, ageism, and oppression against persons who are LGBTTIQQ intersect with fat phobia.

We would also like to include photos of tummies and other areas of our body which we may be told to feel ashamed of, or feel disconnected from through fat phobia. We would like to showcase how our bodies are beautiful, no matter what society says. Anonymous photos are welcome.

This zine will be distributed for free or by donation at the Bookfair (to help with shipping costs to contributors). Individuals who contribute will receive free copies by mail if they are not attending the Bookfair. (Just be sure to send us your mailing address!)

Please email fatisfabulous@gmail.com should you have any questions or to submit photos/art/writing.

We need all contributions by September 30, 2009. We apologise for the short notice.

 


Comments

Catchfire
Online
Joined: Apr 16 2003

The Politics of Fat: We Have to Keep Struggling to Liberate Ourselves from Self-Hatred

Quote:
Several prominent feminist bloggers focus extensively on body acceptance, but their work often goes beyond the singular relationship of gender and fat. Writer and activist Tasha Fierce is a frequent contributor to Bitch and Jezebel and creator of the blog Sex and the Fat Girl, where Fierce documents her experiences as a self-described “fat, queer woman of color.” She is particularly passionate when addressing the intersectionality of fat bodies.  

“Our approach to building fat community needs to be a comprehensive and all-inclusive one,” says Fierce. “White cisgender feminists who are fat need to recognize that there are different levels of oppression — not everyone who is fat is only facing discrimination because of their weight.” She pointed to a recentcall-to-action by the organization NOLOSE which argues that people of color are too often portrayed as the impoverished, tragic face of a heavily politicized and trending obesity epidemic. Social justice organizers in both the fat-acceptance and feminist communities are responsible for facilitating inclusiveness within their ranks, she says. Fierce shared her insights for creating that environment. “When there are fat activist gatherings, the organizers need to make sure the venues and materials are accessible to those who use differing methods of communication — these are just basics to start with.”

Fierce is hardly the only feminist-minded writer who insists on an intersectional approach to feminism and fat positivity. Late last fall, Hanne Blank released an expanded edition of Big Big Love, Revised: A Sex and Relationships Guide for People of Size (and Those Who Love Them). Blank read Fat Is a Feminist Issueas a college undergraduate. Her vision for mitigating privilege is deceptively simple and profound. “Shutting up and listening with humility and openness to what other people have to say about their experiences and their needs would be a great start,” says Blank. “Then work on creating coalition politics.” There’s also the work of renowned womanists Renee MartinMonica Roberts and Tami Winfrey Harris, who recently posted on the harsh criticism hurled at the overweight, middle-aged Downton Abbey star Brendan Coyle’s appearance in a love scene.  


MegB
Offline
Joined: Nov 28 2001

Catchfire wrote:

The Politics of Fat: We Have to Keep Struggling to Liberate Ourselves from Self-Hatred

“Shutting up and listening with humility and openness to what other people have to say about their experiences and their needs would be a great start,” says Blank. 

Yes!


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