Bye Bye Greg!

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Aristotleded24
Bye Bye Greg!

I was looking for an existing thread to post this, but I think it warrants its own:

Greg Selinger stepping down as MLA:

Quote:
The announcement comes a week after NDP Leader Wab Kinew asked Selinger to resign in the wake of inappropriate touching allegations by seven women against former MLA Stan Struthers, while Selinger was leader of the party.

A defiant Selinger, 67, offered an apology to those women last week but said he was not ready to step down.

On Tuesday, he read a prepared statement saying he's concerned not stepping down at the time took away from the important message about sexual harassment.

Selinger then told reporters he wasn't ready when Kinew made the call because he first wanted to consult the St. Boniface community he has represented as MLA since 1999, as well as his constituency and his family.

This is good news, but it is far too late. Selinger came to prominence as Finance Minister under Gary Doer. Under his watch, the Manitoba government continued the trend of reducing taxes that had started under the previous Gary Filmon government, a trend that was well documented by the CCPA Manitoba. That is the under-rated story as to why the province's finances eventually ran into deficit, not overspending as is commonly believed, and not flooding as Selinger would have us believe. And when the chickens came home to roost and the province needed more money, did Greg decide to raise it in a progressive way? No. He raised the PST which not only is a consumption tax that hurts those with lower incomes, but it also broke a promise and angered people so much that they couldn't see the more positive aspects of the NDP record or what it really meant to elect Pallister.

For me, what I will remember most about him is his sutbborn defiance. First of all, any iditot with lhalf a brain would have told you that raising the PST was political suicide, but he pushed ahead anyways. And the actions of Oswald et al were reprehensible, but they were triggered in large part by Greg's intransigence when it was clear that he was losing support within the party. He still ran. During the election, he made the campaign all about himself even when polling said that he was nearly the singular cause of the NDP's drop in popularity. I'm actually surprised that he didn't try to hang onto leadership after the election. Most former leaders in Selinger's position would have stepped down. Even Harper knew after October 2015 that he had worn out his welcome and moved out of the spotlight lest he continue to be a drag on his party's fortunes.

So why is Selinger leaving now? Remember those accusations of harassment at the hand of Stan Struthers? Part of that happened under his watch as leader. Last week, he had a press conference where he said he was sorry but was refusing to step down. I suspect that there was talk about the NDP removing him from Caucus all together, which would explain why he's stepping down at this moment. The real legacy of the Manitoba NDP, I believe is a stubbornly high poverty rate that only started to go down slightly during his term, but not nearly enough. If there is one thing that has hurt the NDP most, it's that whenever the NDP tries to say, "we're for the working men and women," people look at what happened under Greg's watch as Finance Minister and Premier and say, "we've seen how you actually treat poor working people, no thank you."

Don't let the door hit you on the way out, Greg!

Ken Burch Ken Burch's picture

Glad he finally left.  In addition to making an aggressive effort to address sexual harassment and eradicate any semblance oof "rape culture" in the party, Kinew should finally pledge the party to passing anti-scab legislation and to switching from the PST to a progressive income and corporate tax policy as the means to raise revenue.

MAKE THE MNDP THE MNDP AGAIN!

Hunky_Monkey

Interesting considering many social democratic countries like Sweden have much higher levels of consumption taxes than Canada.  They must not be as progressive.

Aristotleded24

Hunky_Monkey wrote:
Interesting considering many social democratic countries like Sweden have much higher levels of consumption taxes than Canada.  They must not be as progressive.

Consumption taxes are inherently regressive because people of lower incomes have to spend more money on basic essentials. They are also part of the austerity packages that the EU demands member countries implement that are unpopular for that reason. I know that Norway charges oil royalties that are much higher than here in Canada, but other than that I don't know what kind of measures the Scandinavian countries use to offset the regressive nature.

Besides, he said he wouldn't raise the PST, and he then went back on his word and raised it anyways. What conclusion is the average voter going to reach other than he is just another piece of @#%@&$%$$ politician who lies and breaks is promises?

Let's never mention the name of the former Premier and soon-to-be former Saint Boniface MLA again, shall we?

Aristotleded24

If you need another reason to hate the impact that Doer's modernization had on the NDP and Manitoba, the fiasco surrounding the Tina Fontaine reason is a very good one. There were long standing problems with the child welfare system in Manitoba that the government ignored. There were also cases of children dying in care long before Fontaine was murdered (think Phoenix Sinclair). Whatever baby steps that the government took to reform the system, like pledging not to house children in hotels, happened long after people lost trust in the system and by then the system was too broken for those reforms to have any meaningful impact. It's noteworty that in his closing ad in the last campaign, Pallister mentioned the issue of children in care, effectively telling NDP supporters that the NDP government had not lived up to its purported values. Even I looked at that ad and thought, "I can't stand Pallister, but he's got me on that one."

Aristotleded24

So out with the old and in with the new. A woman by the name of Blandine Thomas is running for the NDP nomination in St. Boniface. She's a human rights activist, and a name that I've not heard before which suggest she has no ties to the old NDP guard. In other words, upon first glance, her candidacy sounds exaclty like the kind of renewal that the Manitoba NDP needs.

NorthReport
Badriya

Aristotleded24 wrote:

So out with the old and in with the new. A woman by the name of Blandine Thomas is running for the NDP nomination in St. Boniface. She's a human rights activist, and a name that I've not heard before which suggest she has no ties to the old NDP guard. In other words, upon first glance, her candidacy sounds exaclty like the kind of renewal that the Manitoba NDP needs.

Thanks for the good news.  She sounds like a breath of fresh air who will rejuvenate the Party.  A small point:  her last name is Tona.