You are doing one hell of a job Brad Wall!

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NorthReport
You are doing one hell of a job Brad Wall!

Frown

NorthReport

Mistakenly my ass!

This is right out of the right-wing dirty tricks playbook.

What kind of shit headline is this?

Sealed record mistakenly released

It is unclear who is responsible for Saskatchewan court documents that should have been sealed being released to media pundit Ezra Levant.

The Court of Queen's Bench in Regina released the records to Levant and Rebel Media last month.

The documents detailed the 1994 assault conviction of Brent Dancey - who now serves as a chief of staff in Alberta's NDP government - and were published on Rebel Media's website. Dancey, 18 and living in Regina at the time, was sentenced to nine months in jail.

However, Dancey was pardoned in 2005 and according to the court's guidelines, the pardon meant the records should have been kept out of the public eye.

A pardon - formally called a record suspension - allows people convicted of a criminal offence, who have completed their sentence and demonstrated they are law-abiding citizens for a number of years, to have their criminal records kept separate and apart from other criminal records.

 

 

http://www.thestarphoenix.com/Sealed+record+mistakenly+released/11218108...

 

robbie_dee

The apparent leak of a sealed court document for crassly partisan purposes is disgusting.

However it would probably also facilitate discussion if this thread had a slightly less crassly partisan title, or at least a title more appropriately focused on the topic. Did Brad Wall personally leak the document?

NorthReport

The buck stops here. 

Unionist

robbie_dee wrote:

Did Brad Wall personally leak the document?

No, of course not. It was the Saskatchewan courts. And who names judges to Saskatchewan courts? Stephen Harper.

I demand that this thread title be modified to replace "Brad Wall" with "Stephen Harper".

The buck stops there.

 

Todrick of Chat...

Unionist wrote:

robbie_dee wrote:

Did Brad Wall personally leak the document?

No, of course not. It was the Saskatchewan courts. And who names judges to Saskatchewan courts? Stephen Harper.

I demand that this thread title be modified to replace "Brad Wall" with "Stephen Harper".

The buck stops there.

Wrong, I blame the judge's parents. They raised their kids so poorly, with no morals or ethics.

What type of parent let their kid become a lawyer anyways? 

NorthReport

Who is the Premier?

The provinces administer justice in their jurisdictions. This includes organizing and maintaining the civil and criminal provincial courts and civil procedure in those courts.

http://www.justice.gc.ca/eng/csj-sjc/just/07.html

Unionist wrote:

robbie_dee wrote:

Did Brad Wall personally leak the document?

No, of course not. It was the Saskatchewan courts. And who names judges to Saskatchewan courts? Stephen Harper.

I demand that this thread title be modified to replace "Brad Wall" with "Stephen Harper".

The buck stops there.

 

NorthReport
epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Building the “Saskatchewan Advantage”

Saskatchewan’s 2017 Austerity Budget

Saskatchewan's 2017 budget landed with an unenthusiastic thud last week. Riddled with cuts, job losses, public sector wage reductions, and tax increases, the Saskatchewan Party's austerity budget has garnered few friends, with critics ranging from organized labour movement to small businesses.[1] The government's budget has several fiscal goals: aggressively tackle its $1.3-billion deficit in three short years, overhaul the tax structure away from progressive forms of taxation to consumption taxes, and dismantle key aspects of the social welfare state.

In our view, Budget 2017 should be viewed in two ways. First, it is clearly a reactionary document drafted by an openly conservative government responding to the dramatic fall in natural resource prices that began in 2014. Second, and perhaps equally important, the budget is also a calculated political decision to exploit the fiscal crisis to further transform the provincial state to facilitate long-term private capital accumulation in the natural resource sector, keeping those sectors free from a burdensome tax regime or regulatory pressure. In other words, the government is using the fiscal crisis to push through the so-called “Saskatchewan Advantage,” which it defines as the province having “the lowest corporate tax rate and the lowest tax rate on manufacturing and processing in the country.”

quote:

Challenging the “Saskatchewan Advantage”

To date, opposition to the Saskatchewan Party has been largely waged by organized labour in response to wage reductions, job losses, and changes imposed upon the province's labour relations system. Notwithstanding a large labour organized demonstration outside the legislative assembly on 8 March, throughout the Saskatchewan Party's tenure, many of these struggles have been largely legal in nature and have not mustered serious community mobilization and rank-and-file activism. But now, with austerity and tax measures that will undoubtedly impact small towns and rural areas, the terrain of struggle might be shifting. With the amalgamation of health regions on the horizon, the winding down of the STC, cuts to education and libraries, and potential threats to municipal service levels, the space for broader opposition to austerity has widened.

Recent initiatives like SaskForward, which formed in 2017 as a means of constructing an alternative vision of “transformational change,” have brought together a coalition of civil society groups to work on charting a different political path for Saskatchewan. The Saskatchewan Federation of Labour has launched the Own It! campaign, designed to reach out across the labour movement to build a larger fight-back strategy and Unifor, CUPE, SEIU-West and SGEU have been vocal critics of the Saskatchewan Party's austerity agenda. Equally promising is that the Fight for $15 and Fairness movement that has been growing across North America has surfaced in the province. Meanwhile, the Saskatchewan Teachers Federation (STF) has remained virtually silent as their members face layoffs and significant funding cuts. Adding teachers to the chorus of anti-austerity efforts could create conditions for mass demonstrations against the government not unlike Ontario's Days of Action. If the Saskatchewan Union of Nurses (SUN) were to add their significant influence to the struggle by joining forces with healthcare unions already engaged in the fight, we are convinced that the movement would be a formidable obstacle to the government's austerity agenda.

josh

Polling firm Insightrix says an unpopular budget has cost the Saskatchewan Party significant support.

A recent poll showed 44 per cent support for the governing party. 

It's a sharp drop from the 2016 election, where 62 per cent of voters cast their support for the party.

The poll showed 40 per cent support for the provincial NDP

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/poll-lowest-sask-party-support-1.4077126

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Fightback against austerity is essential

Posted by The Stand Community Organizing Centre

There are moments in history where local politics have national, and even international, significance. Saskatchewan is currently living one of those moments.

Have no illusions. The recent provincial budget is about more than reducing government expenditures. It is an act of class warfare, and the beginning of a process of redefining the society you live in – massively reducing the social role of the state, and transferring yet more wealth to the already wealthy. There are three budgets left in the Sask Party’s current mandate and they will be worse than one just announced. They will be about ‘permanent austerity’, not short-term belt-tightening....

Images from protests around Saskatchewan after the release of the Saskatchewan budget in March 2017, which eliminated an essential transport service (STC) and dramatically cut funding to libraries and other services, while reducing corporate taxes and raising consumption taxes.

6079_Smith_W

They are passing legislation to prevent legal challenges by the municipalities:

http://thestarphoenix.com/news/local-news/because-they-were-going-to-gov...

This is about them withdrawing grants in lieu that crown corporation should be paying to municipalities for property tax. Basically maintaining the streets in front of their facilities.

Government Relations Minister says the province prevented cities from challenging controversial legislation "because they were going to."

Aristotleded24

[url=http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/poll-lowest-sask-party-support-1... Party support drops below 50% for the first time ever in its mandate:[/url]

Quote:
Polling firm Insightrix says an unpopular budget has cost the Saskatchewan Party significant support.

A recent poll showed 44 per cent support for the governing party. 

It's a sharp drop from the 2016 election, where 62 per cent of voters cast their support for the party.

Aristotleded24

6079_Smith_W wrote:
This is about them withdrawing grants in lieu that crown corporation should be paying to municipalities for property tax. Basically maintaining the streets in front of their facilities.

Isn't it also about the Saskatchewan government also trying to undermine a leftist civic administration in the province's biggest city by tying their hands financially?

6079_Smith_W

Not only. This affects a number of cities, including those in areas which traditionally support the Sask Party. The hardest hit is going to be Yorkton. The cuts aren't simply an attack on the presumed left. The library cuts and the STC cut is going to hurt people in rural areas far more than in the cities.

It is a combination of them covering their asses after squandering the province's savings, and using that mismanagement to implement ideological cuts. It is the same reason why they are trying to force school boards to ask teachers to come back to the table and renegotiate signed contracts. It really show how ignorant they are about how things work.

 

Aristotleded24

6079_Smith_W wrote:
Not only. This affects a number of cities, including those in areas which traditionally support the Sask Party. The hardest hit is going to be Yorkton. The cuts aren't simply an attack on the presumed left. The library cuts and the STC cut is going to hurt people in rural areas far more than in the cities.

Is there a realistic chance that these cuts will cost the Saskatchewan Party enough support that they will lose the upcoming by-election in Swift Current?

6079_Smith_W

That is Brad Wall's constituency. I wish there was a vacancy there, but there is not.

We just had a byelection here in Saskatoon, which the NDP won from the Sask Party. It happened before the budget, and Wall refused to give an economic report prior to it. No surprise there.

 

Aristotleded24

6079_Smith_W wrote:
That is Brad Wall's constituency. I wish there was a vacancy there, but there is not.

Wall was consistently one of the most popular Premiers in the country for about a decade. Do you think he really wants to stick around long enough for the impact of the cuts to undermine that?

Aristotleded24

6079_Smith_W wrote:
We just had a byelection here in Saskatoon, which the NDP won from the Sask Party. It happened before the budget, and Wall refused to give an economic report prior to it. No surprise there.

It's a seat with longstanding NDP support. Having said that, the last time the NDP did that well there was the height of their public popularity in the early 1990s, and having more seats is always better than not.

6079_Smith_W

He has already said he doesn't plan to run again. I expect his agenda is to do as much damage as he can in the next three years.

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

 

All Out to Stop the Cuts! Protest the Premier's Dinner!
Thursday, April 27 at 5:00 PM - 7:00 PM
Prairieland Park
503 Ruth St. Saskatoon

Aristotleded24

My my my:

Quote:
n the 2009 agreement, CP agreed to cover the cost of building a new facility west of Regina in what is now the GTH. It also agreed to upgrade the rail infrastructure. 

The government said it would pay for the land, the cost of servicing the land, internal roadways and parking lots, and the moving of power lines.

In addition, the government agreed to improve the surrounding roadway. That was to be funded by a contribution arrangement between the province, the federal government, the City of Regina and CP.

Todd MacKay with the Canadian Taxpayers Federation wonders how this deal was beneficial to taxpayers.

He pointed out that SaskPower bought 145 acres at the GTH in 2013, the same year CP opened its new facility. The Crown corporation paid $25 million for its land, or $172,000 an acre.

I'm betting that retirment, consultancy, and a few appointments to Boards of Directors are going to start looking very good to Wall very soon. Why let some scandals and (since rescinded) cuts to libraries detract from the "nice guy" image Wall has worked so hard to cultivate?

6079_Smith_W

For anyone not familiar with the whole GTH scandal, this is worth watching:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Oq7Bn3gRREE

And Boyd is not the only one with a potential conflict of interest:

http://thestarphoenix.com/storyline/it-might-be-possible-that-even-premi...

And just last week we had that court ruling that will stop provincial funding for non-catholic students in catholic schools. So all those schools Wall just built - catholic and public schools joined at the hip - are kind of up in the air.

http://leaderpost.com/news/local-news/long-running-theodore-court-case-d...

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/brad-wall-catholic-school-studen...

 

 

Timebandit Timebandit's picture

6079_Smith_W wrote:

He has already said he doesn't plan to run again. I expect his agenda is to do as much damage as he can in the next three years.

And to set things up so that he can feather his nest afterward. Lots of corporate favours will lead to a highly productive "retirement,", I'm sure.

6079_Smith_W

Now this:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/sask-party-passes-bill-to-sel...

Thing is, regardless of what Brad Wall claims once they sell more than 10 percent they are no longer publicly owned, and will have to pay corporate taxes.

Aristotleded24

6079_Smith_W wrote:
Now this:

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatchewan/sask-party-passes-bill-to-sel...

Thing is, regardless of what Brad Wall claims once they sell more than 10 percent they are no longer publicly owned, and will have to pay corporate taxes.

But I thought Wall was a Nice Guy and all that stuff about the Saskatchewan Party wanting to privatize the Crowns was just NDP fearmongering!

I have to give Wall credit for how he was able to put a charming face on a right-wing party that at its core wants to privatize everything that isn't nailed down (although they would probably then rip out the nails and privatize those items as well). Makes me wonder how they are going to do without him.

6079_Smith_W

They are going to ram through as much as they can, just like Devine did when he saw the writing on the wall, and wait for the next cycle when the NDP fixes what they can, and people forget.

At this point he is fucking over his own department of education. Fighting the lawsuit started by his own school boards, and trying to strongarm them into the impossible and unethical task of bringing teachers back to the table to renegotiate a signed contract.

 

6079_Smith_W

And it is hardly the first time. He was playing these kinds of games back when he tried to get an excemption for justices of the peace who didn't want to support marriage equality. The human rights commission called him out openly on that one.

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

..with video

Protesters swarm cars outside dinner event hosted by Sask. Premier Brad Wall

Hundreds of people from more than a dozen organizations rallied outside the Premier's Dinner venue in Saskatoon Thursday night, where Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall gave a keynote address. 

Protesters outside the event showed their opposition to cuts outlined in the 2017-2018 provincial budget. They began converging on Ruth Street, around Prairieland Park, before 5 p.m. CST.

The Premier's Dinner — an event hosted by the ruling Saskatchewan Party — was taking place at the park's Hall A.

Drivers on nearby Ruth Street found their cars blanketed by sign-waving protesters and organizers speaking through megaphones.

Some protesters even climbed atop some of the cars, causing tensions to rise....

6079_Smith_W

In fact, the most violent thing which happened (and the only personal attack) was a protester punched in the face by someone in a car.  But some in the media and government are using a few people leaning on cars to call the demonstration "violent".

Aristotleded24

And the police are saying that they were caught off guard and not properly prepared. Is that plausible? Will they look at the public opinion polls more closely and take that into account when dealing with public safety around protests targeting this government?

6079_Smith_W

I think it is a change in policy. There were two cops there who actually did their jobs fine. No one got in their face, and they didn't get in anyone's face. They just made sure that the cars eventually got through. That is, that people could make them wait, and move on within a few minutes.

There was nothing to be caught offguard about because nothing was out of control.

Thing is, there was a much smaller demo a few weeks ago where there were nine cops, several plainclothed. So it's not like they didn't know what was happening.

I think this has more to do with wealthy people being inconvenienced and making a lot of noise, and some in the media spinning this as a violent protest when it was not. That is why the police are going to be debriefing on it this week.

One of the specific things Weighill said was that they are going to be reviewing security around VIPs. Although no one at any of these protests has threatened anyone, other than a protester being punched in the face by someone going to have supper with the premier.

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Panel discussion features unions talking about effects of provincial cuts

“People were getting mad at the CEO and VPs and human resources and I’m like, ‘They didn’t wake up in the morning and say, ‘How are we going to screw over our employees?’ They get their direction from the government so that’s who you’ve got to be upset with,” said Michelle Lang, president of PSAC local 4005.

Lang was a member of a panel who discussed how provincial cuts are affecting workers at the Regina and District Labour Council’s annual AGM on Saturday.

The panel was meant to inform other unions in both the public and private sector of what is currently happening in the province.

quote:

“(People are) waking up, they’re understanding. We actually have people contacting us through Facebook and through the local saying that, ‘I was at your rally. I want you guys to come out and speak again. We want your help on this,” she said.

However the sentiment throughout the panel and within the rest of the meeting was that there needs to be something more done. The unions feel the rallies that have been held lately have helped however they feel there should be a general strike held.

“Well it’s going to have to be planned and it has to be 100 per cent participation or else its not going to work,” Lang said.

A general strike would see all public sector employees who are members of unions not working for one day in order to show how important the work they do is for the province.

There hasn’t been any official plans made yet but the idea of a general strike has been talked about amongst union members and is possible to happen in the future.

“We’re not going to going to want to shut the province down totally we want to make sure that we do have hospitals and that running. I don’t know what it would (all) entail (currently),” Wilson said.

josh

New polling numbers released in Saskatchewan suggest the Saskatchewan Party would mostly likely be defeated if an election was held today, says the executive vice-president of the polling firm.

The poll from Mainstreet/Postmedia suggests decided and leaning support for the NDP is at 49 per cent — an increase of seven points — compared to the Saskatchewan Party's 40 per cent, a drop of seven points.

http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/saskatoon/sask-party-ndp-poll-voter-support-1.4130347

quizzical

why does CBC do such a good job of investigating corruption in SK but not BC?

6079_Smith_W

Some would argue they don't. But those are decisions that are generally made at the local level.

quizzical

smith i was reading all about the huge "international" malls allegedly being built. 1 in Dundurn and another now in Regina. we'd never get reporting like this in BC 

6079_Smith_W

I'm not disagreeing with you. I'm saying those are usually priorities that get set at the local level - in Regina and Victoria. So it is different people making the decisions.

And there are some here who don't think the CBC is always sympathetic or fair. on these issues. I know they have underreported protest numbers, not been too critical regarding the false claims about violence at rallies, and one of the "experts" they had on a few weeks ago was very pro-privatization when it came to the budget cuts. Again, that can vary from reporter to reporter.

The I Team's work on the GTH (which has been going on for several years now) has been really good. Same for the coverage of the Lean program in health care, which was a similar waste of money.

Misfit

I also don't think that the CBC does a good job of representing positions in favour of our crowns and reasons not to privatize. 

quizzical

i don't know anything about those other things. just followed a link off of the one above and then started reading through it all.

this shit different pile is going on all over BC even here in our small town.

i don't really follow CBC i just know no media in BC would even think of doing an expose piece like they did on the GTH.

6079_Smith_W

It is a good thing to remember. Alternative media is important, but it really does not have the same resources that mainstream media does to put reporters on a story for months, and to finance access to information requests and lawyers. That is part of the reason why, as spotty as its record is, institutions like the CBC are important.

 

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Civil war in the oilpatch

One of Canada's largest oil companies says it quit a major industry lobby group for refusing to join the Saskatchewan premier's war against a carbon tax.

The decision by the firm, Crescent Point Energy, to quit the oil industry group, the Canadian Association of Petroleum Producers (CAPP), has stunned industry watchers and sparked a war of words between the premier and a federal Liberal member of Parliament over the decision.

Crescent Point, described as “North America's busiest oil dealmaker,” has long supported Saskatchewan Premier Brad Wall's provincial political party, making hundreds of thousands of dollars in corporate donations, election returns show.

The company's president has also registered to lobby Wall on government climate change policy, according to provincial records. Both the company and Wall deny that the firm's political donations had any influence over the province's climate policy.

quote:

Wall has traded barbs with Notley over her tax, inviting companies to flee her province for his, and has also rejected a new federal government plan to price carbon pollution nationwide, threatening to take the government to court. He can now count on Crescent Point, a large oil company to publicly back him.

The premier told National Observer through his office that he had heard the company was considering pulling out of CAPP, and confirmed he had discussed the province's position on a federal carbon tax with Crescent Point "as well as many other resource companies."

 

Aristotleded24

Misfit wrote:
I also don't think that the CBC does a good job of representing positions in favour of our crowns and reasons not to privatize.

Chanelling Alanis Morisette:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Jne9t8sHpUc

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Protesters arrested after 5 hour takeover of last STC bus

Saskatoon police arrested several protesters who took over a Saskatchewan Transportation Company (STC) bus for nearly five hours Wednesday evening.

Six arrived on the last bus from Regina around 8:30 p.m., refusing to get off at the Saskatoon bus station. A seventh protester from inside the station ran past security and joined them.

Nearly 100 demonstrators stood inside the bus terminal, cheering them on and singing songs about saving the 71-year-old bus company, which ended its operations Wednesday night.

"We're going to make sure we're a pain in (the government's) ass, because they're a pain in ours," Damion Graham, one of the protesters on the bus, said.

"We don't want the Sask. government to just sit on their hands and ignore us."....

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Sask. school workers say 'it's an absolute no' to 3.5% pay cut

Saskatchewan school caretakers, educational assistants and library workers say they will not accept wage cuts being demanded by the provincial government. 

"This is horrible," said Jackie Christianson, who represents 7,000 school support workers through the Canadian Union of Public Employees. "I have members who are using the food bank."....