You are doing one hell of a job Brad Wall!

64 posts / 0 new
Last post
Aristotleded24

6079_Smith_W wrote:
For all his folksy charm act the talk today was that he may go down as a lot worse than Grant Devine. At least he left some infrastructure behind. Wall basically wasted a huge surplus and has done nothing but sell off, tear down, and rip off.

Not quite. It's now easier to drive around Regina.

Misfit

Bull Shit it is!!! 

Misfit

They designed a traffic circle 12 miles east of Regina to make it easier for Semis and farmers to cross the TransCanada highway with their farm equipment. it turns out they designed it too small for Semis and farm implements. They put in an overpass in the wrong place and now they have to rip it down and rebuild. It won't be completed until late next year. Right now it's a  traffic fiasco.

Misfit

NDP won by-election of Saskatoon Fairview by a landslide. 

NorthReport

BC, AB, and now possibly SK with NDP governments. How sweet it would be, and then on to Ottawa for the 4th, eh!

Misfit

Saskatoon Fairview Results

NDP 60%

sp 31%

 

Oh, and the MSM was heavily predicting a very tight race!

NorthReport

The NDP are showing signs of life now in a third province, so of course the right-wing represented by the so-called 'mainstream media' will be freakin' out.

The media like to call themselves 'mainstream media' but calling themselves mainstream is like the Vancouver Non-Partisan Association calling themselves non-partisan. as are anything but

Byelection loss raises stakes in Sask. Party leadership race

http://leaderpost.com/news/politics/byelection-loss-raises-stakes-in-sas...

Aristotleded24

Misfit wrote:
Saskatoon Fairview Results

NDP 60%

sp 31%

Oh, and the MSM was heavily predicting a very tight race!

I'm not the least bit surprised that the NDP took this constituency with over half the vote. The real acid test, IMV, will be how well the NDP does in Swift Current when Wall steps aside. They need to be able to win key swing seats in small cities and rural areas, and the results in Swift Current will give a sense of how that is going.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Crude Power: ‘Oil is king in a province where resistance is small’

This week, National Observer published the first chapters of an unprecedented national investigation into the power and influence of the oil and gas industry in Canada.

These stories — the first of several in a series — zeroed in on southeastern Saskatchewan, where rogue hydrogen sulfide gas has been leaking from industry operations scattered throughout the region for years. Both government and industry knew about the problem, but failed to curb it before someone died and a several others were sickened.

This investigation, called The Price of Oil, is the largest journalistic collaboration in Canadian history, conducted over a year in partnership with the Toronto Star, Global News, journalism schools at the universities of Concordia, Regina, British Columbia and Ryerson, The Michener Awards Foundation and the Corporate Mapping Project. It includes hundreds of never-before-seen internal government and industry documents, along with staggering statistics about spills, industry compliance failures, and the steady flow of cash from the patch....

Crude Power - a 47 min video

Crude Power brings viewers on a powerful journey through the bobbing pump jacks, rusting tank batteries and wellheads of Saskatchewan — a province where "oil is king" and "resistance is small," it asserts. It was produced by students at the University of Regina School of Journalism, with support from The Price of Oil partners.

epaulo13 epaulo13's picture

Inside Saskatchewan's failure to stop a silent killer

By Elizabeth McSheffrey, Mike De Souza, Robert Cribb, Patti Sonntag & P.W. Elliott | 

This investigation is the first chapter in an unprecedented series investigating the power and influence of the oil and gas industry, and its impacts on Canadian communities.

There’s something deadly lurking in the rolling hills, pastures and valleys of Saskatchewan.

It can be an insidious killer. Invisible to the human eye, at high concentrations it can bring death within seconds as its victims suffer from respiratory paralysis.

To date, it has claimed the life of one unsuspecting oilpatch worker, a father of two, while debilitating several others who were fortunate enough to survive an encounter.

Its name? Hydrogen sulfide, H2S, also known as sour gas.

Leaked from the wellheads, pump jacks, pipes, tanks and flare stacks of the oilfields, it’s the colourless, corrosive and highly toxic substance that left Shirley Galloway’s relative sick on contact.

In October 2012, the teenager drove through a toxic plume of sour gas outside the Galloway home in southeastern Saskatchewan. Alerted by screams, Galloway rushed into the yard, where she found the teen vomiting amid the telltale smell of rotten eggs, with an accelerated heart rate....

Mr. Magoo Mr. Magoo's picture

Quote:
The media like to call themselves 'mainstream media'

Is that really how they self-identify??

Seems to me that "mainstream media" (or better yet, just "MSM") is how the left describes any media that appears to favour the status quo.

voice of the damned

Mr. Magoo wrote:

Quote:
The media like to call themselves 'mainstream media'

Is that really how they self-identify??

Seems to me that "mainstream media" (or better yet, just "MSM") is how the left describes any media that appears to favour the status quo.

Well, the right uses it that way as well, ie. to criticize the media for supposedly being too close to powerful elements in society, however those elements are defined. 

And I've occassionally seen it used by the "mainstream media" itself, though usually with the purpose of calling into question the legitimacy of their own sector. From The Guardian... 

http://tinyurl.com/ybru9dmf

Your broad point is correct, though, the term is usually not used in a complimentary or even neutral fashion. There is usually an intended negative connotation attached to it. 

FWIW, one of the most awkward attempts at using a pejorative as a neutral descriptive was in the aftermath of the Charlottetown Accord, which happened to correspond in time with the 1992 presidential election campaign, in which anti-"elite" rhetoric played a large role, thanks mostly to Ross Perot.

Peter Mansbridge was hosting some sort of gabfest to talk about the Accord's demise, and they had a panel consisting of politicians, journalists etc, along with a studio audience. When Mansbridge switched from talking to the pundits to talking to the audience, he segued it with "Well, now that we've spoken to some of the elites, let's hear what average Canadians have to say." 

 

NorthReport

Pages